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By Richard Halloran | October 23, 2002
HONOLULU -- In the three weeks since the North Koreans gummed up the Bush administration's foreign policy machinery, a great mystery has been why they did it, what they expected to gain from it, and, particularly, why now. Truth be told, no one really knows because Pyongyang is not among the world's more transparent capitals and the government-controlled North Korean press has given only a few clues. Even so, U.S. intelligence analysts, South Korean and Japanese political observers and scholars who specialize in Korean affairs, who asked not to be identified, have provided different pieces of the puzzle.
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NEWS
By Bruce S. Lemkin | February 13, 2013
Last April, when a North Korean missile launch appeared to be imminent, this newspaper published my commentary urging the U.S. to "get tough with North Korea. " My determination that U.S. actions to date had produced little or no effect in deterring the Democratic People's Republic of Korea - the DPRK - from engaging in irresponsible, downright hostile behavior, and that an unmistakable stance of intolerance toward further provocations was needed, was based on four years of experience negotiating in and with the DPRK.
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NEWS
July 1, 2008
North Korea's long-awaited declaration detailing its nuclear activities, which it handed over last week in response to six-party disarmament talks with China, Russia, South Korea, Japan and the U.S., was thin gruel compared with what the Bush administration originally wanted. But it was better than nothing, which is what the administration probably would have gotten had it held to its previous policy of not talking. The North had agreed to a full accounting of its nuclear activities in return for food and energy assistance.
NEWS
By Bruce S. Lemkin | April 30, 2012
After four years of negotiating in and with North Korea, I cannot say that I have all of the answers to deal with a regime that defies the expectations of rational thinking, but I do have at least one of them: The Democratic People's Republic of Korea leadership, whoever happens to be the leader of the moment, whether Great, Dear, or Supreme, can only be dissuaded from chronically irresponsible behavior and from crossing a so-called red line (i.e.,...
NEWS
October 15, 2008
Having removed North Korea from its list of terrorist nations in order to coax it back into compliance with a previous agreement to scrap its nuclear weapons in exchange for aid and energy assistance, the U.S. still has no idea whether the reclusive communist state really intends to fulfill its commitment to disarm. The loopholes in the deal U.S. negotiator Christopher Hill managed to salvage in Pyongyang last week are big enough to drive several atom bombs through. But that may be the best the Bush administration could hope for in its waning days.
NEWS
By BARBARA DEMICK and BARBARA DEMICK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2006
MACAU -- For decades, this former Portuguese colony was renowned as a haunt of counterfeiters, drug runners and spies. Banks here handled millions of dollars on behalf of North Korea's government, which long has been accused by the United States of selling illegal drugs to raise hard currency. The nation's founder, Kim Il Sung, and his son, current leader Kim Jong Il, allegedly kept their ill-gotten gains in Macau. But now the welcome mat has been rolled up and the North Koreans, who didn't have many friends to begin with, find themselves distinctly unwelcome in this autonomously governed Chinese territory.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 6, 2003
TOKYO - Former President Jimmy Carter, who was credited with defusing the 1994 North Korean nuclear crisis, warned here yesterday that the current standoff is the world's "greatest threat." "This paranoid nation and the United States now are facing what I believe to be the greatest threat in the world to regional and global peace," Carter said. The Bush administration had no immediate comment on Carter's visit or message. Carter, who received the Nobel Peace Prize last year, met here yesterday with Japan's prime minister, Junichiro Koizumi.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
BEIJING - A United Nations envoy just back from North Korea said yesterday that the Pyongyang regime is concerned it could be the next military target of the United States and might take another provocative step to show it is prepared. But diplomat Maurice Strong said he detected "a very strong commitment" from North Korea to negotiate an end to the nuclear standoff with the United States, and he urged Washington and Pyongyang to come to the table to avoid the possibility of tensions spiraling out of control.
NEWS
June 16, 2000
THE SUMMIT of the two Koreas exceeded expectations in atmospherics if not specifics. Peace is not at hand but is suddenly imaginable. No problem has been solved but all may become soluble. Live television from the forbidden North during the visit of President Kim Dae Jung to Pyongyang mesmerized South Koreans. Obsolete film cameras captured the same scenes for careful editing before viewing in North Korea. The South's and West's perception of Chairman Kim Jong Il changed in three days from unpredictable mad recluse to a relatively normal human being who is a Communist dictator.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2003
NIIGATA, Japan - Citing safety violations, Japan detained in the port here yesterday the lone ship that ferries passengers between Japan and North Korea, two countries at loggerheads over Pyongyang's nuclear program. As a sailor on the top deck triumphantly waved North Korea's red star banner and waitresses led rousing choruses of the "Song of Comrade Gen. Kim Il Sung," the white-hulled vessel docked here for the first time since January, when it was met by angry protesters. Protesters were out in force, demanding an end to North Korea's nuclear weapons program and a full accounting for up to 100 Japanese believed to have been abducted to North Korea in the 1970s and 1980s.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Geraldine Baum and Paul Richter and Geraldine Baum,Tribune Newspapers | May 26, 2009
The United States and allied powers threatened Monday to impose new penalties on North Korea after the defiant regime announced a second nuclear bomb test, but their leverage in derailing the weapons program appeared limited. The five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, meeting in emergency session in New York, denounced the test as a "clear violation" of a 2006 resolution banning such actions. China and Russia, usually North Korea's defenders, joined with France, Britain and the United States in the statement.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Washington Bureau | March 27, 2009
WASHINGTON -North Korea's planned missile launch is designed to demonstrate its ability to carry out an intercontinental military strike, a top U.S. official said Thursday, brushing aside Pyongyang's assertions that it is merely sending a satellite into space. "Most of the world understands the game they are playing," said Director of National Intelligence Dennis C. Blair. "I think they're risking international opprobrium and hopefully worse if they successfully launch it." Blair's comments represented the most pointed U.S. challenge so far to Pyongyang's repeated assertions that its planned rocket launch is for peaceful purposes.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,Tribune Newspapers | February 20, 2009
SEOUL, South Korea - Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said yesterday that U.S. officials and their allies are scrambling to prepare for North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's possible departure from power, a development she said threatened new turbulence in one of the world's most heavily armed regions. Arriving in Seoul for security talks, Clinton said persistent signs within the secretive Pyongyang government suggest that a change of leadership might be at hand. She said the South Korean government has been especially concerned about possible developments inside its impoverished northern neighbor.
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,Los Angeles Times | February 9, 2009
SEOUL, South Korea - The South Korean intelligence reports are ominous: North Korea appears to be preparing to test-launch a ballistic missile with sufficient range to strike Alaska and possibly the U.S. West Coast. A train transporting a large cylindrical object was recently spotted by a U.S. surveillance satellite chugging toward a new launch site west of Pyongyang, a South Korean government source said recently. Allegedly onboard was North Korea's most advanced missile, a Taepo-Dong 2, being readied for a potential liftoff within two months.
NEWS
October 15, 2008
Having removed North Korea from its list of terrorist nations in order to coax it back into compliance with a previous agreement to scrap its nuclear weapons in exchange for aid and energy assistance, the U.S. still has no idea whether the reclusive communist state really intends to fulfill its commitment to disarm. The loopholes in the deal U.S. negotiator Christopher Hill managed to salvage in Pyongyang last week are big enough to drive several atom bombs through. But that may be the best the Bush administration could hope for in its waning days.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Julia Damianova and Barbara Demick and Julia Damianova,Los Angeles Times | September 25, 2008
VIENNA, Austria - North Korea kicked U.N. weapons inspectors out of a plant that previously produced weapons-grade plutonium and notified the International Atomic Energy Agency that it would restart operations as early as next week, the nuclear watchdog said yesterday. The moves mean the North could be reprocessing plutonium in a matter of months. This latest provocation by North Korea kills what little hope remained that the U.S. could complete a denuclearization deal in President Bush's remaining months in office.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- North Korea said yesterday that it is not bound by its own moratorium on long-range missile tests, as tension over Pyongyang's intentions continued to mount. In Washington, a senior State Department official challenged North Korea's interpretation, saying that the United States expects the Pyongyang government to abide by its commitments. A North Korean Foreign Ministry official had told Japanese reporters that a missile test would not be "bound by any statement such as the Pyongyang Declaration," the Kyodo news agency reported.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration yesterday described meetings scheduled for next week with North Korean officials in Beijing as a step that it hopes will lead to Pyongyang's abandonment of its nuclear weapons program. The administration said it did not expect a quick breakthrough in getting North Korea to halt its nuclear program. Officials fear such weapons could either be used to threaten the North's neighbors or be sold to terrorists or other rogue nations. But the announcement of the planned meeting involving North Korea, the United States and China serves to lessen tensions on the Korean peninsula at a time when the United States is preoccupied with stabilizing postwar Iraq.
NEWS
July 1, 2008
North Korea's long-awaited declaration detailing its nuclear activities, which it handed over last week in response to six-party disarmament talks with China, Russia, South Korea, Japan and the U.S., was thin gruel compared with what the Bush administration originally wanted. But it was better than nothing, which is what the administration probably would have gotten had it held to its previous policy of not talking. The North had agreed to a full accounting of its nuclear activities in return for food and energy assistance.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 23, 2007
SEOUL, South Korea -- The chief U.S. nuclear envoy, returning from the first visit to North Korea by a ranking U.S. official in five years, said yesterday that Pyongyang had assured him it was ready to shut down its main nuclear reactor and would ultimately disable it. In the course of a two-day trip, Christopher R. Hill, the assistant secretary of state for East Asian affairs, met with his counterpart, Kim Key Gwan, and Foreign Minister Pak Ui Chun....
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