Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPutin
IN THE NEWS

Putin

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 6, 2014
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. recently asked "what do you think it will take to get [President Obama] to see that Mr. Putin and his fellow bullies might be playing him for a fool?" Since it takes one to know one, Mr. Ehrlich should know - about being a bully, that is. After all, this is the same power-besotted individual who, as governor in 2004, autocratically promulgated a ban against Sun journalists, issuing a memo ordering his staff not to speak with two Sun writers. He even sicced his wife on the Sun and the Washington Post in 2005, having her declare that those two publications should be "punished.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 6, 2014
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. recently asked "what do you think it will take to get [President Obama] to see that Mr. Putin and his fellow bullies might be playing him for a fool?" Since it takes one to know one, Mr. Ehrlich should know - about being a bully, that is. After all, this is the same power-besotted individual who, as governor in 2004, autocratically promulgated a ban against Sun journalists, issuing a memo ordering his staff not to speak with two Sun writers. He even sicced his wife on the Sun and the Washington Post in 2005, having her declare that those two publications should be "punished.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 4, 2008
To say the fix was in would be to state the obvious. But there's no other way to characterize the election of Dmitry Medvedev as Russia's new president, a win as predictable as the victory party that accompanied it. And that includes the must-attend Sunday night concert in Red Square where a chorus of supporters shouted the name of the grand master and architect of Mr. Medvedev's win, Vladimir V. Putin. The current president has made it clear that he intends to remain very active as Mr. Medvedev's prime minister.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
With Russian troops amassed along its border and Kremlin-backed separatists in control of major cities in eastern Ukraine, the government in Kiev is facing the gravest threat to its survival since the breakup of the former Soviet Union a generation ago. Unless the U.S. and its allies can convince Russian President Vladimir Putin to step back from using the unrest there as a pretext for military intervention, it looks more likely than ever that eastern...
NEWS
By Mark N. Katz | September 17, 2004
RUSSIAN President Vladimir V. Putin has seized upon the Beslan school tragedy to chip away even further at Russia's democracy. But instead of strengthening his own power, it's possible that his plan will backfire and lead to the sort of peaceful popular protest that led to the downfall of authoritarian rulers in most of Eastern Europe in 1989, in Serbia in 2000 and in Georgia in 2003. During the era of Mr. Putin's predecessor, Boris N. Yeltsin, Russians increasingly came to equate democracy with poverty and insecurity.
NEWS
August 21, 2002
FIGHTING TERRORISM is one thing, but protecting Russia's long-term political and economic interests is quite another. That is the unmistakable message from Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, who has been improving Russia's relations with Iraq, Iran and North Korea even as he has supported President Bush's declared war against the "axis of evil." Is Mr. Putin, a former KGB cloak-and-dagger careerist, being duplicitous? Not really. He is just behaving the way Russian leaders have done through the ages: moving on several fronts at the same time, pursuing the motherland's glory and self-interest.
NEWS
By Anna Johnsson | November 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - Recently arrested Russian oil tycoon Mikhail B. Khodorkovsky broke six rules of doing business in Russia that cost him dearly: Do not become the wealthiest person in Russia. Do not run your company in a relatively transparent and Westernized manner. Do not invest money in the civilian sector. Do not support reform-minded political parties. Do not suggest that presidential power be limited and that parliamentary power be increased. Do not solicit support from the United States, especially not if the Russian president is friendly with the American president.
NEWS
By David Horsey | March 11, 2014
It is rather curious, given the American conservative movement's long and dramatic history of anti-Communism and anti-Russian saber rattling, that many leading voices on the right are speaking about Russian President Vladimir Putin with varying degrees of admiration. For some, it is just a matter of comparing Mr. Putin's toughness to President Barack Obama's alleged weakness. Without suggesting any love for Mr. Putin, Republicans in Congress have asserted that Russia's incursion into Ukraine would not have happened had Mr. Obama not been such a wimp in his dealings with Moscow.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 1, 2014
Vladimir Putin has been kicked out of an exclusive club, but he may not even care. Last month, meeting in The Hague, leaders from seven of the world's biggest economic powers agreed to blackball Mr. Putin's Russia, reducing the G8 to the G7. They ratified the decision to move the group's upcoming annual world economic summit to Brussels, taking away from Mr. Putin the chance to host the event in Sochi, site of his recent successful Winter Olympic...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 24, 2006
COMPIEGNE, France --President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia dismissed concerns over his country's growing interest in the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Co. at a meeting here yesterday with his French and German counterparts. "As far as the acquisition of a 5 percent stake is concerned, it is not at all evidence of aggressive behavior on the part of the Russian side," Putin told reporters. "We will not use this stake to change in any way the institutional situation of EADS." Discussions with President Jacques Chirac of France and Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany at Compiegne, north of Paris, included Russia's handling of its energy resources and such diplomatic issues as Lebanon and Iran.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
We all should give a big, hearty thanks to Chief Justice John Roberts and his crew of conservatives for putting a big "C" back in government corruption. By turning complete control of our government over to our own lovable and eminently trustable oligarchs, Mr. Roberts has virtually annexed the Constitution for the wealthy. He's sort of like Vladimir Putin, sans the charm and good looks. William Smith, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Nilay Saiya | April 7, 2014
The White House has responded to Russian actions in Crimea by taking a number of steps against Moscow: It has ramped up sanctions, verbally denounced the Kremlin's flouting of international law, effectively kicked Russia out of the G8 and given rhetorical support to Ukraine's new government. Such measures, however, are likely to deepen and prolong the crisis, not resolve it. The conventional view in Washington is that Russian President Vladimir Putin is a belligerent authoritarian intent upon expanding Russia's borders and confronting the West.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 1, 2014
Vladimir Putin has been kicked out of an exclusive club, but he may not even care. Last month, meeting in The Hague, leaders from seven of the world's biggest economic powers agreed to blackball Mr. Putin's Russia, reducing the G8 to the G7. They ratified the decision to move the group's upcoming annual world economic summit to Brussels, taking away from Mr. Putin the chance to host the event in Sochi, site of his recent successful Winter Olympic...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 28, 2014
Russian President Vladimir Putin's land grab of Crimea, with more threatened to come, has Republican neoconservatives eagerly lining up to denounce President Obama as a deplorably weak leader who settled for throwing snowballs at Putin rather than military muscle. Former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, laboring to keep his presidential aspirations flickering after a brief day in the sun in the 2012 Republican primaries, has temporarily doffed his anti-abortion hat to get in front of the parade.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
Western governments and specifically the Obama administration have been laughably naive about Russian President Vladimir Putin's reactions and intentions in Crimea and the Ukraine ( "Obama must take stronger measures to confront Putin," March 20). Mr. Putin's empire-building aspirations have now become transparent to the world. A dictator with an occasional perfunctory nod toward reform, one who grew up and came to power in the KGB during the Cold War, he has been unmoved by sanctions and diplomacy.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 22, 2014
What is it about Western leaders from Neville Chamberlain to George W. Bush who want to find good in men of bad character? Acting as if he were endowed by special insight bestowed upon no one else, President George W. Bush declared in 2001 that he had looked Vladimir Putin in the eye and "was able to get a sense of his soul. " According to the Daily Caller.com, in a 2010 interview with talk radio host Hugh Hewitt, Mr. Bush, who was promoting his book "Decision Points," was asked about his ability to see into the souls of men. The former president explained, "The reason why I said that is because I remembered him talking movingly about his mother and the cross that she gave him that she said she had blessed in Jerusalem.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | September 3, 2007
In most countries, the future is impossible to predict, but the past doesn't change. In Russia, it's just the opposite. President Vladimir V. Putin, when he is not busy restoring autocracy to a country that has known little else, has taken on the task of refreshing Russian history with a novel perspective - his own. He is on record lamenting the collapse of the Soviet Union as "the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the century." It was worse, apparently, than World War I, worse than World War II - worse, even, than the creation of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
In the month that he has been on trial for treason, Oleg D. Kalugin has spent weekends at his Ocean City condo with his daughter and 12-year-old grandson, who are visiting from Moscow. He has gone for his usual long-distance ocean swims. Back in Washington, the former KGB major general has lectured as usual on Russian politics and intelligence, tended to his consulting business and tried out the new Fresh Fields near his Silver Spring home. And occasionally, Kalugin, 67, has checked the Web for the latest word on his closed trial in Moscow, where he is represented by a lawyer with whom he has never spoken and where a three- judge panel is expected to hand down his sentence today.
NEWS
March 21, 2014
Part of the reason that Russia has acted to annex Crimea and will likely grab at least the eastern portion of the Ukraine in the very near future is that every American president since the break-up of the Soviet Union has loudly, and at times obnoxiously, proclaimed that the United States is the only remaining superpower in the world ( "Putin's land grab," March 19). Mr. Putin's actions are his way of saying that Russia also a superpower, and since he has ground troops and nuclear weapons to back up his claim, he makes a pretty convincing albeit heavy handed case.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 21, 2014
The right side of history is bunk.   In domestic politics, people (mostly liberals) tend to say, "You're on the wrong side of history" about social issues that are breaking their way. It's a handy phrase, loosely translated as, "You're going to lose eventually, so why don't you give up now?"   Philosophically, the expression is abhorrent because of its "Marxist twang" (to borrow historian Robert Conquest's phrase). The idea that history moves in a predetermined, inexorable path amounts to a kind of Hallmark-card Hegelianism.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.