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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
Dr. Philip H. Pushkin, director of the Baltimore County Department of Aging for four years, has been removed from that post to become the county's new federally paid director of emergency management.County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III announced the change yesterday, which is subject to County Council approval.If approved by the council, Dr. Pushkin, 57, would start his new job Feb. 1.A dentist by training, he also is a general in the Maryland National Guard, which Mr. Ruppersberger said makes him uniquely qualified for the new post.
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NEWS
November 5, 2009
Jane Stofberg Pushkin, Services were held at St. Andrew's School Chapel in Boca Raton, FL
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Monika Greenleaf and Monika Greenleaf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2003
Pushkin: A Biography by T.J. Binyon. Knopf. 732 pages. $35. T.J. Binyon's Pushkin, winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for biography in England, has arrived in America. In this handsome volume of more than 700 pages, the reader is greeted by a typical page from one of the celebrated Russian poet's working notebooks. Caricatured male profiles, stylized female profiles with upswept hairdos, figures in expressive motion, fetishistic legs and feet, historical personages, friends, lovers, enemies and the occasional sword or pistol bloom crazily along the margins and between lines of poetry.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | June 16, 2008
Julian Pushkin, owner of a Baltimore actuarial firm and a passionate pianist who nearly lost his hands to a shotgun blast, died of cancer June 12 at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82. Mr. Pushkin was born in Baltimore and came from a family of musicians. His Russian grandfather played in the czar's royal orchestra, and his father played drums for the Baltimore Municipal Band and timpani in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. As a child, Mr. Pushkin also wanted to take up the drums, but his father encouraged him to study piano.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | June 16, 2008
Julian Pushkin, owner of a Baltimore actuarial firm and a passionate pianist who nearly lost his hands to a shotgun blast, died of cancer June 12 at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82. Mr. Pushkin was born in Baltimore and came from a family of musicians. His Russian grandfather played in the czar's royal orchestra, and his father played drums for the Baltimore Municipal Band and timpani in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. As a child, Mr. Pushkin also wanted to take up the drums, but his father encouraged him to study piano.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 16, 1999
My initial professional training was in literary studies, my first job was teaching Renaissance poetry and drama to university undergraduate and graduate students and now I write primarily about music. It's no surprise, therefore, that I'm often asked which I prefer -- words or music?That's an impossible question to answer -- unless the context is that of a solitary existence on a desert island. In that situation -- one without electricity, presumably -- I figure that I'd be better off with volumes of Milton and Shakespeare than with CDs of Chopin and Mozart.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 17, 1999
It appears to be Pushkin season in Baltimore. Tchaikovsky's "Eugene Onegin," based on Alexander Pushkin's verse novel, is being performed by the Baltimore Opera Company, and a block away, at the Theatre Project, Pushkin-philes can see the great Russian writer's "The Little Tragedies" performed by the Stanislavsky Theatre Studio.Based in Silver Spring, the troupe was founded in 1997 by theater artists who emigrated from the former Soviet Union. The company has a movement-oriented approach, which ties in nicely with the dream-or-nightmare quality of the four short pieces that make up "The Little Tragedies."
NEWS
By KATHY LALLY and KATHY LALLY,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 6, 1999
MIKHAILOVSKOE, Russia -- Zhenya Ryabova, 11 years old and very end-of-20th-century in silvery wraparound sunglasses and red "101 Dalmatians" T-shirt, hops off a lumbering tourist bus here and happily answers a request to recite a 179-year-old poem.With speed, enthusiasm and inflection, Zhenya rattles off her favorite part of "Ruslan and Ludmila," a poem about an evil dwarf thwarted by a romantic hero that was written nearly two centuries ago by Alexander S. Pushkin, who once lived on an estate in this northwestern Russia village.
FEATURES
September 16, 2000
Gary Pushkin, a Baltimore area physician and weekend cook, shows the world how to make dessert with a blowtorch on a segment of "Ultimate Kitchens" airing today at 12:30 p.m. on The Food Network. Pushkin removes a cake from a mold with the blowtorch, then coats the cake with chocolate sprayed from a paint gun. Pushkin says he learned many dessert-making techniques from the late Eric Goldschmidt, a well-known Baltimore cake-maker who operated shops on Park Heights Avenue and in the York Plaza shopping center.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
Seventeen metropolitan hospitals have entered into an agreement with the Baltimore County Department of Aging to help subsidize CountyRide, which counts among its duties driving the elderly and disabled to hospitals.CountyRide operates 28 vans, including 13 with wheelchair lifts. Funding for CountyRide, which last year cost $911,000 to operate, comes from federal, state and county sources, and ridership fees."This agreement will help reduce the burden on county taxpayers," said Dr. Philip Pushkin, director of the county agency.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND and WILL ENGLUND,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
The Stolen Prince Hugh Barnes Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 324 pages / $27.95 Russia has never exactly been a magnet for immigrants, but over the centuries foreigners have kept showing up, and their experiences have been unlike those of strangers anywhere else, certainly anywhere else in Europe. Foreigners can never become un-foreign among Russians, but they can become what you might call adjunct members of Russian society, and even gain a fair measure of respect from the chronically insecure people around them.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
On Monday, September 27, 2004, EVELYN PUSHKIN (nee MOSSOVITZ); wife of the late Max Emanuel Pushkin, mother of Beverly Katz and Brigadier General Philip Pushkin (US Army Retired) and the late Boris Stanley Pushkin, mother-in-law of Sandra Pushkin and the late Martin W. Katz, sister Sylvia Hirsch, the late Samuel Moss, Jeanette Cohen, Hilda Ritt, Gertrude Levin, Harry Mossovitz, Morris Mossovitz and Marion Rosenberg; grandmother of Larry Katz, Rachael and Brian Schwartz, Stacey and Raymond Klebanow and Amy and Steve Jarkiewicz; great grandmother of Madisyn and Andrew Schwartz, Gabrielle and Max Klebanow and Carly Jarkiewicz.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monika Greenleaf and Monika Greenleaf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2003
Pushkin: A Biography by T.J. Binyon. Knopf. 732 pages. $35. T.J. Binyon's Pushkin, winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for biography in England, has arrived in America. In this handsome volume of more than 700 pages, the reader is greeted by a typical page from one of the celebrated Russian poet's working notebooks. Caricatured male profiles, stylized female profiles with upswept hairdos, figures in expressive motion, fetishistic legs and feet, historical personages, friends, lovers, enemies and the occasional sword or pistol bloom crazily along the margins and between lines of poetry.
FEATURES
September 16, 2000
Gary Pushkin, a Baltimore area physician and weekend cook, shows the world how to make dessert with a blowtorch on a segment of "Ultimate Kitchens" airing today at 12:30 p.m. on The Food Network. Pushkin removes a cake from a mold with the blowtorch, then coats the cake with chocolate sprayed from a paint gun. Pushkin says he learned many dessert-making techniques from the late Eric Goldschmidt, a well-known Baltimore cake-maker who operated shops on Park Heights Avenue and in the York Plaza shopping center.
NEWS
By KATHY LALLY and KATHY LALLY,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 6, 1999
MIKHAILOVSKOE, Russia -- Zhenya Ryabova, 11 years old and very end-of-20th-century in silvery wraparound sunglasses and red "101 Dalmatians" T-shirt, hops off a lumbering tourist bus here and happily answers a request to recite a 179-year-old poem.With speed, enthusiasm and inflection, Zhenya rattles off her favorite part of "Ruslan and Ludmila," a poem about an evil dwarf thwarted by a romantic hero that was written nearly two centuries ago by Alexander S. Pushkin, who once lived on an estate in this northwestern Russia village.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 17, 1999
It appears to be Pushkin season in Baltimore. Tchaikovsky's "Eugene Onegin," based on Alexander Pushkin's verse novel, is being performed by the Baltimore Opera Company, and a block away, at the Theatre Project, Pushkin-philes can see the great Russian writer's "The Little Tragedies" performed by the Stanislavsky Theatre Studio.Based in Silver Spring, the troupe was founded in 1997 by theater artists who emigrated from the former Soviet Union. The company has a movement-oriented approach, which ties in nicely with the dream-or-nightmare quality of the four short pieces that make up "The Little Tragedies."
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | February 14, 1996
WHEN ERIC Goldschmidt died this summer at the age of 84 and when Rudolf Rauch closed Rudy's Patisserie a few weeks ago, fans of well-made desserts were saddened.Mr. Goldschmidt made spectacular cakes. He not only baked cakes, he dispensed cultural wisdom as well. When, for example, Mr. Goldschmidt made a sacher torte for a visiting reporter, he not only assembled the ingredients, he also gave a history lesson tracing the gateau's lineage back to the Viennese pastry chef, Franz Sacher.Mr. Goldschmidt was born in Berlin and, as a teen-ager in Germany, he served a 4 1/2 -year apprenticeship learning the pastry-making trade.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 16, 1999
It's hard to imagine a performance of Tchaikovsky's "Eugene Onegin" much better than the current production by the Baltimore Opera Company. "Onegin" is better-suited to Italianate lyric voices than that "other" popular Russian opera, Mussorgsky's "Boris Godunov." But "Onegin" presents enough challenges to non-Russian speaking singers; any company that gives us an "Onegin" this fine has reason to be proud.Of course it didn't hurt that there were several fine Russian singers in the cast, including the splendid Maria Gavrilova as Tatyana.
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