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By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 18, 2003
Push-to-talk could be the biggest upgrade to mobile phones since wireless service became affordable a decade ago. With push-to-talk, also known as PTT, callers organize a group of co-workers or friends. By pushing a button on your phone, everyone in the group can hear you simultaneously and immediately without having to hit the green "answer" button. On Aug. 18, Verizon Wireless became the first mass-market wireless carrier to offer PTT; the only previous PTT provider was Nextel, which aims mostly at business users.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The Maryland Transit Administration police are investigating a recent fight between three people on a Baltimore Metro train, in which a young male appears to try to throw a man he is fighting from the train while it is in motion, a spokesman confirmed. Video of the incident between the man and two younger males was posted on Facebook last week and had been shared more than 5,000 times as of Monday evening. Paul Shepard, a MTA spokesman, said police have the video, but little additional information.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 12, 1995
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Describing the Republican election victory as a "rare window of opportunity," officials representing the nation's manufacturers voted yesterday to lobby hard for two laws and to push the rest of their goals to the back burners. One law would reduce government regulation and the other would limit lawsuits against businesses.Just the existence of a Republican Congress, and particularly one that might enact such cherished goals, lifted spirits among the 150 top executives attending a directors meeting of the National Association of Manufacturers, their first gathering since the election.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Races in the Baltimore Running Festival will begin an hour earlier than originally scheduled because of the Orioles' deep run into the baseball postseason. In a letter to participants posted on the running festival's website , organizer Lee Corrigan wrote that start times were made earlier to "ensure all public safety personnel can be deployed in an organized fashion. " The festival, which includes a marathon, half-marathon, group relay, 5k and kids race, will stagger starting times between 7 a.m. and 8:45 a.m. on Oct. 18, the day the Orioles and Kansas City Royals would potentially play Game 7 of the American League Championship Series at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By Orange County Register | December 30, 1992
Pentagon critics and their allies in Congress are planning t push for sweeping reforms next year to wipe away the "the old boy network" they say has blocked changes in the way the military handles sex-crime allegations within its ranks."
NEWS
April 23, 1991
Since coalition troops cleared Kuwait of Iraqi occupation in February, the government of Kuwait has been a disappointment to its people and its friends. Whatever services operate were restored by U.S. personnel. Kuwaiti authorities have lagged in reconstruction, even in the preliminaries. And there is no excuse: For seven months in exile, Kuwait's rulers had little to do but plan for the return.If Kuwait has heroes, they are the people who stayed put when Iraq's tanks rumbled in, who endured the atrocities and provided the resistance that helped achieve the restoration.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | March 8, 2001
GEORGE W. BUSH is one smooth operator. If he keeps going at his present pace, they could start calling him "Slick Georgie." He's had the smoothest takeoff of any recent president, sliding behind his Oval Office desk as though he's been there before. It helps to follow in your dad's footsteps. It also helps if you have the good sense to hire the best of your dad's employees -- the ones who know their way around Washington and know how to run a business. Looks like George W. got something out of Harvard's MBA program.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2005
There's a guy at my gym who's always doing one-leg push-ups. I've seen people do push-ups on one arm before, but can you explain how to do a single-leg push-up? My arms and legs are strong, and I think it would add a challenge to my routine. Performing a push-up with the support of just one leg can be difficult, but when done correctly it's a great way to kick your push-up routine into a higher gear. To do a one-leg or "leg-lift" push-up, begin in the traditional push-up position. Your feet should be hip-width apart, with your arms straight and your abdominal muscles tight so your body is flat like a board.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
How thick is thick as a brick?The answer, apparently, is 4 inches -- or, as one Baltimore County homebuilder is finding out, it might be the distance between being inside and outside of the law.The issue arose yesterday when Glen Arm Homes asked to be exempted from "setback" requirements for 28 homes planned for Pine Grove, a residential community in Carney.The builder said that adding brick to the front of the houses would increase their depth by 4 inches -- and push them outside the prescribed "building envelopes."
NEWS
By BARBARA DEMICK and BARBARA DEMICK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- U.S. and Asian officials are trying to use the atmosphere of crisis generated by North Korea's missile tests as the impetus for a fresh diplomatic push on its weapons, according to participants in meetings here over the weekend. The push came as North Korea adopted an increasingly defiant tone, saying that U.N. sanctions would be tantamount to war. In a rare statement attributed directly to North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, his nation's radio yesterday broadcast an editorial saying that Kim had announced a "heroic position" in which he "promised to answer to an enemy's retaliation with retaliation and to an all-out war with an all-out war."
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
Power reliability was a foreign concept just a few years ago. For years, many of us in Howard County suffered through power outage after power outage. We lost freezers full of food, stayed overnight in hotels and risked running generators to stay warm. Sometimes, as in the case of the derecho in June of 2012, we were without power for days and weeks. Things have been markedly better in the last year when it comes to power outages, and lest we forget, I wanted to remind everyone how this happened and why we owe our thanks to Councilwoman Courtney Watson.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The nation's transportation system is broken, agreed a panel of transportation wonks gathered in downtown Baltimore on Thursday, but they could not agree on how to fix it. "Transportation is broken. There's no way to fund it. America is one big pothole," said Ray LaHood, a former U.S. transportation secretary. "It will be up to the American people to say enough is enough. " Opinions for fixing it at the Greater Baltimore Committee's seventh annual transportation summit ranged from increasing federal investment in local infrastructure projects that would help address broader issues to cutting all federal investment in such projects to focus on national highway needs instead.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young came under fire Wednesday as critics charged that he pushed his favored candidate through a committee appointed to fill a vacant council seat. A committee of community leaders, appointed by Young, listened to more than four hours of testimony Tuesday evening from 14 candidates for the seat - and in less than five minutes agreed to nominate Federal Hill Neighborhood Association President Eric T. Costello, who was supported by Young.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
A diverse coalition of business groups, unions and transit advocates is urging Maryland voters to put a constitutional "lockbox" on state transportation funds, making it harder for governors and lawmakers to divert the money to other purposes. Andrew Feldman, a spokesman for the coalition, said more than a dozen groups will contribute money to back Question 1 on the Nov. 4 ballot, which would for the first time give transportation funding explicit protection in the state Constitution.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
It's hard to imagine what the snarling football coaches of yesteryear — think Bear Bryant or Woody Hayes — would have made of the poetry on the helmet and sleeves of the uniforms the University of Maryland played in Saturday. But the Under Armour designers of Maryland's "Star-Spangled" uniforms, which highlight the Francis Scott Key poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" in cursive, would like to think that the old-school coaches might have approved. The uniforms, which the Terrapins wore in Saturday's home loss to West Virginia, were intended to promote the team and inspire players and fans.
NEWS
By Glenn Whipp and Glenn Whipp,Los Angeles Times | February 6, 2009
The painfully inscrutable paranormal thriller Push introduces us to a host of characters with various gifts - some can see the future, some can heal, some can plant ideas, some can make change for a dollar. By the time the credits roll, your most fervent wish is to run into a "wiper" (one who can erase memories) after stumbling into the lobby. That, or a telepath who could convince you that you just watched Slumdog Millionaire instead. We are told in a windy, opening-credits prologue that psychic experiments started by Nazis are now being continued by the U.S. government to create some kind of super army.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | March 8, 1994
Flanked by a physician, a Roman Catholic bishop and the superintendent of the state police, Gov. William Donald Schaefer today urged legislators to defy the powerful gun lobby and enact his gun control package during this legislative session."
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Noting that student loan debt in the U.S. has ballooned to roughly $1 trillion, Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin spoke with students at Bowie State University on Thursday to draw attention to a proposal Democrats will push next week to allow borrowers to refinance their student loans. "In this country you can refinance a yacht but you can't refinance your student loan," Mikulski said. "We want students to have a fair shot at lowering their debt interest rates. " The bill, which would allow people to refinance federal and private loans issued before 2010 at a rate below 4 percent, is not likely to gain much traction in this Congress.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A car rammed into a Howard County doughnut shop Monday evening, seriously injuring two people. A photo posted by the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services showed a dark-colored sport utility vehicle inside the Dunkin Donuts at 8455 Baltimore National Pike in Ellicott City. According to the department, the car struck two men, ages 36 and 44, shortly after 5:30 p.m. as they were standing outside the doughnut shop, and pushed them into the storefront. They were taken by ambulance to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where they were listed in serious but stable condition.
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