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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1998
A Mount Airy man convicted last year of drunken driving while on a horse dropped his appeal yesterday in Carroll County Circuit Court.William B. Bell, 38, was convicted in October in District Court and received a 30-day suspended sentence and three years probation. He had pleaded not guilty, but Judge Marc G. Rasinsky found him guilty.Bell appealed the conviction to Circuit Court.William Purpura, a Baltimore attorney who represented Bell in the appeal, said his client thought he could drink and ride a horse, but doing so was a violation of the motor vehicle law."
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NEWS
By Steven Kivinski and John Harris III and Steven Kivinski and John Harris III,Staff writers | November 14, 1991
Cross country runners Scott Boetig of Old Mill and Fran Mackney of Severna Park have more in common than either probably realize.The two seniors each captured first place in the county and region meets before falling short in last week's state meet at Western Maryland College.Despite their lower finishes at Saturday's running of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association cross country championships, Boetig and Mackney, share a common bond in their selections as this year's Anne Arundel County Sun Male and Female Runners of the Year.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2000
A former $120,000-a-year computer programmer was sentenced to 63 months in federal prison yesterday for soliciting an undercover agent he believed was a child, receiving an unusually high sentence because he intended to film a minor in sexual poses with a digital camera, prosecutors said. Michael Perry, 52, of New York City received roughly five times the sentence he ordinarily would have for traveling across state lines to have sex with a minor. Perry was arrested Sept. 16 at a Columbia bookstore, where he went expecting to meet "Amy," a 14-year-old girl he met in America Online chat rooms.
SPORTS
By STEVEN KIVINSKI | May 29, 1998
Performer of the YearVictor Thillet, Old Mill, sophomore: Thillet, who plays soccer in the fall, proved once again this spring that he is one of the most talented distance runners around. The 5-foot-3, 112-pounder went undefeated at 3,200 meters, both indoors and out. In addition to winning the 3,200 at states, Thillet also was third in the 1,600. At the Knights Invite, he won the 1,500 and 3,000 and broke the meet record in the 3,000. At the Meade Stampede, the sophomore won the 5,000-meter run by 40 seconds.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
A Pennsylvania man was convicted of second-degree murder yesterday and sentenced to 30 years in prison for the 1982 contract murder of his younger brother in Cockeysville.David Crist, 41, had faced the death penalty on first-degree murder charges in the slaying of Scott C. Crist, 22, who was fatally shot in his apartment complex parking lot.Defense attorney William B. Purpura, who tried the case in Bel Air on a change of venue with lawyer Arcangelo M. Tuminelli, said they were "extremely pleased" with the verdict, considering that their client could have faced the death penalty.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
The cousin of a man who is on death row for the October murder of a Maryland state trooper on the Eastern Shore is expected to plead guilty this morning in federal court in Baltimore for his role in the crime in exchange for a 20-year sentence.In an agreement with the U.S. Attorney's Office, William Smith Lynch will plead guilty to conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine and the use of a weapon in a drug conspiracy leading to death, said his attorney, William B. Purpura.Lynch, 21, of Brooklyn, N.Y., was charged along with his cousin, Ivan Lovell of Manteo, N.C., in the Oct. 17 slaying of Tfc. Edward Plank Jr. during a routine traffic stop on U.S. 13 near Princess Anne.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2011
It seems an odd deal — plead guilty to gun possession, agree to be imprisoned in a federal penitentiary for up to 25 years, and then admit to killing a man on East Pratt Street in Upper Fells Point back in 2009. But that's what Antonio "Dollar" Edwards did last week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. As part of his agreement with federal prosecutors, the 28-year-old will have to plead guilty to first-degree murder in state court. Once he does that, he will get to serve his time for both crimes in the federal system.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | October 20, 2006
Two brothers admitted in federal court yesterday that they imported more than 100 kilograms of cocaine and heroin from both coasts, sold the drugs to dealers on the streets of Northwest Baltimore and hid their proceeds by investing in nightclubs, suburban real estate and high-performance cars. The hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore gave federal prosecutors close to a clean sweep in the widespread racketeering case. Twelve of the 13 indicted defendants - several of whom appeared to live the quiet suburban life of minivans, cul-de-sac basketball courts and backyard barbecues - have pleaded guilty to helping operate a decade-old drug organization that trafficked large amounts of drugs in the city's Park Heights neighborhood.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
In one scene, a baby girl toddles along the sidewalk as cocaine dealers hustle and count their cash around her. In another, kids with books and backpacks trundle off a school bus amid the steady exchange of drugs and money outside their homes. Federal prosecutors say this was the front-step drug trade in West Baltimore's Lexington Terrace neighborhood, named for the public housing high-rises that once loomed above it. In court this week, they showed video surveillance tapes to jurors hearing a federal death penalty case that grew from those streets.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
A Baltimore County jury on Tuesday rejected a White Marsh woman's claim that the only way to end years of spousal abuse was to hire a hit man to kill her husband. The jury, composed of nine women and three men, convicted Karla Porter of first-degree murder in a case that tested the scope of self-defense arguments. The 51-year-old defendant stood stoically in a dark pant suit with her long red hair tightly braided as the jury foreman read the verdict, which could send her to prison for the rest of her life without the possibility of parole.
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