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By Catherine Sudue | April 6, 2008
Poet and essayist Lia Purpura is about to publish her latest book of poetry, King Baby, which she describes as "a conversation with some knowing kind of force." Due out later this month, the collection has won the Beatrice Hawley Award from Alice James Books. Purpura, a writer-in-residence at Loyola College, says many authors have influenced her writing and her life, but three stand out. "These are three books that shocked me awake, made me want to write better, to live more intensely in a daily way," she says.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 23, 2012
Congratulations to Baltimore author Lia Purpura , winner of a prestigious Guggenheim fellowship. Purpura is writer-in-residence and affiliate associate professor of writing at Loyola University Maryland . Among her recent books of poems and essays are: "Rough Likeness," "King Baby" and "On Looking," which was a finalist for ther National Book Critics Circle Award. Purpura's award, in the general non-fiction category, will help her write a book of essays exploring "the ways people relate to and form relationships with the natural world," according to a news release from the university.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
William B. Purpura Sr., a former ship's cook who survived four torpedo attacks during World War II and later became a chef at the famed Meadowbrook in Cedar Grove, N.J., died of cancer Friday at the Veterans Medical Center in downtown Baltimore. He was 89 and lived at Elkridge Estates in North Baltimore. Born in Rochester, N.Y., to immigrant parents from Sicily, Mr. Purpura was reared in Passaic, N.J. He dropped out of school when he was 16, lied about his age and joined the Navy in 1928.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
With Carl Lackl's family quietly sobbing 20 feet away, 17-year-old Johnathan Cornish sat in the witness box and vacantly described how he killed the Rosedale man as part of a Baltimore Bloods gang mission. He had never met Lackl. He couldn't even remember his victim's hair color. But he shot Lackl three times at point-blank range in 2007 because he was asked to "kill somebody who was telling on [a] homeboy." The testimony, which Cornish exchanged for a plea deal, came Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore in a case against Patrick Albert Byers Jr. and Frank Keith Goodman.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Staff Writer | November 16, 1992
Winning the county and Class 4A, Region IV girls cross country titles was expected at Severna Park this fall, but not the boys Region IV championship.After a second-place finish in the county meet to Old Mill by 39-53, the Falcons of veteran coach Ed Purpura edged the Patriots, 63-68, to repeat as Region IV champion.Purpura is The Baltimore Sun Anne Arundel County cross country Coach of the Year for coaching the Falcons girls to their 10th straight county title and seventh consecutive regional and for leading the boys to their third Region IV title in five years.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
Severna Park cross country coach Ed Purpura is appealing a ruling by the Anne Arundel County board of arbitration that suspended the 15-year coach for the rest of the fall season for using an ineligible runner. Purpura, The Sun's Anne Arundel County Boys Coach of the Year in cross country last season, said yesterday that he filed an appeal Thursday with the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association, asking the state organization to reduce the terms of the suspension. Purpura, who admitted allowing the ineligible runner to compete in two races last month and reported himself to school officials, said the county board's decision Monday to suspend him for the rest of the fall season was too harsh.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
Severna Park cross country and track coach Ed Purpura has filed a complaint concerning coaches' salaries with the Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County and cited John Brady, the Annapolis boys and girls basketball coach, as the reason. Purpura believes that if Brady earns separate salaries to coach the boys and girls teams at Annapolis that he should earn separate salaries to coach the boys and girls cross country teams in the fall and the boys and girls indoor and outdoor track teams in the winter and spring, as first reported in The Washington Post on yesterday.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE | December 17, 2004
Runner of the Year Tait Woodward, Broadneck The Bruins had a hole to fill at the No. 1 runner's spot. In stepped Woodward, who placed in the top 20 in eight major invitationals and championships this fall. The sophomore took home her first Anne Arundel County championship, winning in 19 minutes, 39.5 seconds. Although Woodward lost to Arundel junior Marissa McPhail at the Class 4A East region meet by one second, Woodward turned the table at the state championships by finishing second to McPhail's sixth.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
A longtime prisoner was convicted yesterday of manslaughter in the 2002 stabbing death of another inmate at the Maryland House of Correction Annex, a killing that might have been precipitated by long-simmering ill will and a poker loss. An Anne Arundel County jury refused to find Michael Darryl Henry, 42, guilty of first-degree murder, eliminating the possibility of a death sentence, said one of his lawyers, William Purpura. If Circuit Judge Joseph P. Manck gives Henry the maximum sentence today for manslaughter, 10 years will be added to his prison term, which Purpura said is life plus 60 years.
SPORTS
June 19, 2005
Here's a nugget from Ballplayer 101: When nearing a milestone, downplay it as "just a round number" and "no big deal" so you don't sound selfish. The Houston Astros' Craig Biggio, considered one of baseball's straight shooters, isn't playing that game. Last week he picked up his 2,700th hit. Biggio's now 57th all time and third among active players, behind only the Orioles' Rafael Palmeiro and the San Francisco Giants' Barry Bonds - assuming Bonds' Web site still says he's active. Biggio, the consummate team player during his 18-season career, makes no apologies for wanting 3,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2009
Baltimore County District Court Judge Nancy Purpura enjoys fashion, but keeps it in perspective. The 53-year-old Lutherville resident knows how to make balanced rulings about her style. "I dress in a classic, stylish way for work. For casual wear, I enjoy some fun things, too, but I never go too trendy." When we spotted Purpura having dinner at the Hamilton Tavern with her husband, she was a standout in white, black and turquoise. An inveterate bargain hunter, everything she wore was a steal - even what she had found in her family's native country of Italy.
NEWS
October 16, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS ON CALL, ON DUTY When Theo the half Doberman, half chocolate lab is off-duty, he excitedly greets visitors. When he's on duty, he wears a red, cape-like harness reading, "Assistance Dog. Do Not Pet." Today baltimoresun.com/reimer Cemetery plots A 73-year-old widow discovers that there are no laws to protect you when a cemetery doesn't deliver on a prepaid burial space. Business baltimoresun.com/business OTHER VOICES Jean Marbella on airport stress -- Maryland Tim Smith on the BCO -- Today Eileen Ambrose on 401(k)
FEATURES
By McClatchy-Tribune | January 25, 2007
Two Baltimoreans -- the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and a poet/essayist -- are among the 30 finalists for this year's National Book Critics Circle Awards. Taylor Branch was nominated in the biography category for At Canaan's Edge, the final volume in his epic trilogy about the slain civil rights leader. The author worked on that project for more than two decades. Edge is the sequel to Pillar of Fire. The first volume, Parting the Waters, was published in 1988 and won a Critics Circle Award for general nonfiction, along with the 1989 Pulitzer Prize.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | May 28, 2006
The Houston Astros find it amusing. The roster of the defending National League champions barely has changed. Despite uncharacteristic struggles by three All-Star pitchers, the Astros are hanging above .500 and alive in the early playoff race. Yet everyone outside of the team is focusing on the guy who isn't there. Such is life in the crosshairs of the Roger Clemens big-game hunt. "I think we have been overshadowed since the end of the World Series," said Houston general manager Tim Purpura.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
A longtime prisoner was convicted yesterday of manslaughter in the 2002 stabbing death of another inmate at the Maryland House of Correction Annex, a killing that might have been precipitated by long-simmering ill will and a poker loss. An Anne Arundel County jury refused to find Michael Darryl Henry, 42, guilty of first-degree murder, eliminating the possibility of a death sentence, said one of his lawyers, William Purpura. If Circuit Judge Joseph P. Manck gives Henry the maximum sentence today for manslaughter, 10 years will be added to his prison term, which Purpura said is life plus 60 years.
SPORTS
October 23, 2005
It must be nice to have Kelsey Hill's ability to go really fast on land and in water. Appropriately enough, her life is going by in a blur as well. Hill, a freshman at Severna Park, is a solid swimmer at the Annapolis Swim Club, placing 11th in a 1,000-meter freestyle race and fourth in a 500-meter freestyle competition during a meet earlier this month. She is good enough to have been named Swimmer of the Month at the club in February 2004. But it has been on the cross country course where Hill has become a breakout runner this year.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
With Carl Lackl's family quietly sobbing 20 feet away, 17-year-old Johnathan Cornish sat in the witness box and vacantly described how he killed the Rosedale man as part of a Baltimore Bloods gang mission. He had never met Lackl. He couldn't even remember his victim's hair color. But he shot Lackl three times at point-blank range in 2007 because he was asked to "kill somebody who was telling on [a] homeboy." The testimony, which Cornish exchanged for a plea deal, came Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore in a case against Patrick Albert Byers Jr. and Frank Keith Goodman.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
Jury deliberations will continue this morning in the trial of Patrick S. Walsh, who is accused of conspiring with a tight-knit group of friends to set one of the largest residential arson fires in state history. In closing arguments yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, prosecutors and Walsh's defense attorney disagreed over how to view the evidence against the 21-year-old race car enthusiast from Fort Washington. Assistant U.S. Attorney Donna Sanger said Walsh long planned to use the arsons in the Hunters Brooke development in Charles County to showcase the power of his group of friends known as The Family.
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