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By Cornette | May 19, 1999
Editor's note: A little boy yearns to know the purple coyote's secret but later wishes he hadn't been so curious.In the middle of a flat and arid desert stood a hill of sand and rock.Near this hill was a small house.Jim played alone in the garden with his old truck, which was missing one wheel.One day, a coyote appeared on the hill.A coyote unlike any other.A purple coyote.Jim watched him.The coyote did a little dance. Then he balanced himself on his right front paw and let out a strange howl:"WULULI WULA WULILA WUWU WA!"
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NEWS
Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate said Larry Hogan indicated Wednesday that his opposition to state financing of the construction of Baltimore's Red Line and another large transit project doesn't necessarily mean forever. Hogan continued to insist, as he has since launching his campaign, that the state cannot afford to begin building the $2.6 billion Red Line and $2.4 billion Purple Line In the Washington suburbs at this time.  “I'm not really opposed to the Red Line or the Purple Line and both of them I think are worth considering and I'm not even opposed to continuing along the planning and engineering phases, but quite frankly, you know, we've robbed a billion dollars out of the Transportation Trust Fund,” Hogan said.
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NEWS
By [LARRY CARSON] | January 7, 2007
That purple glow illuminating two of Howard County's most prominent public buildings at night is nothing to be alarmed about -- unless perhaps you're a Washington Redskins fan. In honor of the Baltimore Ravens' bid to play in a second Super Bowl, County Executive Ken Ulman had the county rent purple spotlights that were installed outside the county-owned Gateway building, which is easily visible from Route 175, near Interstate 95, and the George Howard...
NEWS
September 12, 2014
Like thousands of others across Maryland, our staff just celebrated our first Purple Friday of the season. We have a long-running office football pool, and each week a miniature traveling statue of Edgar Allan Poe - clad in a Ravens jersey - rests on the winner's desk as a trophy. Though we haven't converted every employee into a tried-and-true Ravens fan (yet), we all agree we're pleased the Ravens' coaching staff took swift action to terminate Ray Rice's contract following Monday's release of the video showing him assaulting his then-fiancée in February.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
On the face of it, the state of Maryland is flying in the face of Purple Friday. The Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation sent out a message on Twitter today urging Marylanders to wear red Friday to show their commitment to fighting heart disease in women. The timing may be unfortunate because many Marylanders, including much of the General Assembly, already have plans to wear a certain other color in support of the Baltimore Ravens two days before the Super Bowl. The Go Red for Women is part of a national observation sponsored by the American Heart Association, which apparently picked Feb. 1 without football in mind.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen jill.rosen@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
The stylists say purple is the it winter color. But Baltimore already knows that, doesn't it? As the Ravens inch closer to a spot in the Super Bowl, the city has gone seriously, deliriously plum — and, sorry Milan, this is no fashion statement: It's a pride thing. With the light bulbs, the jerseys, the sweaters and the dog collars, the banners, the flags, the hats and the panty hose, the face paint, the ties and even, Lord help us, the wigs, Purple Friday, a season-long staple for die hards, has gone large.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2004
Football season has started and Ravens fans are putting on their purple hats and pulling out their pennants. This year, you can extend the purple passion to your table as well. We've pulled together a panoply of trendy purple vegetables, suitable for your next tailgating party or simply a family dinner. You can pick up purple broccoli, purple cauliflower, purple Peruvian potatoes, purple carrots, purple (maroon) cabbage and even purple asparagus. Ponder the possibilities. Steak and potatoes can take on a new hue. Carrots and hummus can be coordinated with team colors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
For months, the red-brick restaurant building stood forlornly vacant on the corner of Boston and Montford streets. Then, a few weeks ago, it flushed purple. "The paint is called Midnight Mansion. It's supposed to be a gray-blue," says Michael Strati. But, as he discovered, you paint gray-blue on top of red brick, and it becomes ... purple. So how come Strati named his new restaurant Red Fish? "I liked the name," he says. And, somehow the name Purple Fish doesn't have quite the right ring to it. Whether it was the name or the color, business boomed as soon as the eatery opened its doors July 14. "We got busy right off the bat," says Strati.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2001
Baltimore fashionistas probably aren't going to replace the little black dress with the little purple dress, but purple in all its glory is definitely the color of the moment. Not aubergine. Not plum. Not magenta or lavender. Purple. Jimi Hendrix immortalized the shade in "Purple Haze." Alice Walker raised it to the stature of literature. But it took the Ravens heading for the Super Bowl to make purple a fashion basic. For the past couple of weeks, people have been digging out any piece of clothing they own that has even a touch of purple.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | August 28, 1993
Pat Jeddock just adores purple. Purple ice trays and purple window shades. A purple picket fence and heart-shaped purple petunias. And, oh yes, a Charles Village house that's as purple (well, it's really more of a dark lavender) as possible."Purple's been my favorite color ever since I can remember," says Ms. Jeddock, 29, while beating the summer heat in her purple flip-flops. "Eventually, inside and out, the house is going to be purple."But neighbors talk, and the talk around the Jeddock house at 32nd Street and Abell Avenue has not been at all complimentary.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The state ethics board is reviewing one of the firms bidding to build and operate the Purple Line after the engineering company was acquired by another MTA contractor. Engineering design firm AECOM, which in 2011 was awarded an 8-year, $60-million contract with the MTA to oversee the Purple Line and the proposed Red Line in Baltimore, among other projects, announced in July that it had reached an agreement to acquire engineering and construction firm URS Corp. URS Corp. is the lead design company for a group known as the Maryland Purple Line Partners, one of four groups that have been short-listed by the state to submit proposals for what will be a public-private partnership with the state to build the transit line linking Montgomery and Prince George's counties.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 27, 2014
A Washington-area trail users' group and a pair of environmental advocates have filed suit to block the Purple Line , contending the $2.4 billion light-rail project in the DC suburbs threatens to harm two species of endangered crustaceans that live in the creek the transit line would cross. The Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail and John M. Fitzgerald and Christine Real de Azua of Chevy Chase asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Tuesday to overturn clearance given the project earlier this year by the Federal Transit Administration and require federal agencies to explore alternate routes for the rail line.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
It's just not safe to get married in Westeros these days. Ever since he ordered the beheading of the heroic Ned Stark in the first season of “Game of Thrones,” viewers have been patiently waiting for the insufferable boy-king Joffrey to die. (Preferably in as painful a manner as possible.)  Sunday night, they got their wish. Episode two of Season 4,“The Lion and the Rose,” written by George R.R. Martin himself (hallowed be his name), ends with the despicable teenage tyrant's poisoned face turning blue as blood drips from his mouth.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
State officials' assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed Purple Line through suburban Washington satisfies federal environmental standards, the Federal Transit Administration announced this week — an important green light for the project to proceed. The federal clearance is required for federal funding to be spent on the project, as planned, and gives state officials more confidence to begin the long task of acquiring land in the proposed transit line's right-of-way, officials said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A bill that would block a U.S. subsidiary of the French national railway from bidding to become a partner in a $2.4 billion project because of its role in the Holocaust would put federal funding of the project at "significant risk," the attorney general's office has concluded. In an opinion letter sent Wednesday, General Assembly counsel Dan Friedman told lawmakers that enacting the measure would run afoul of the Federal Transit Administration's rules ensuring open competition among bidders for projects to which it contributes money.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
The estimated costs for the Red and Purple transit lines in Baltimore and suburban Washington increased in recent years, an analysis released Wednesday by the Federal Transit Administration showed. The Red Line, which would cut west-to-east across and at times under Baltimore, now is estimated to cost $2.644 billion, $70 million more than a November 2012 estimate, primarily due to "increased construction costs for underground stations and for the heavy maintenance facility," according to the report.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 1, 2006
Anybody notice the purple lights on the Washington Monument lately? Too late now if you haven't. They switch back to white tonight, now that it's March. But all last month, the monument glowed purple. Why? Well, it was actually a bit of a mistake, says Jennifer Morgan, director of community outreach for the city's Recreation and Parks Department. Rec and Parks agreed, at the request of the Maryland branch of the American Heart Association, to shine red lights on the monument during February, for national heart month.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | January 17, 2009
The Rev. Frank Reid III has a problem: how to dress for tomorrow's service at Bethel AME Church in Baltimore. Should he deliver the sermon wearing his Ravens sweat shirt or the Ray Lewis jersey? "We've encouraged the congregation to wear purple," Reid said. "And at some point [during the service] I will mention that we want to pray for the team." Purple passion has reached the pulpit. All around town, the clergy are throwing their ecumenical weight behind the Ravens, who play Pittsburgh tomorrow night for a spot in the Super Bowl.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 24, 2014
After the success of last year's fundraiser in memory of her daughter, Josephine "Joey" Gay, who died in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings, Michele Gay wants to continue the momentum with a second fundraiser to fuel a safe schools initiative. So the Columbia native was in the area last week to meet with volunteers to work on Joey's Second Annual Purple Ball and visit the offices of Vice President Joe Biden and Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal on behalf of Safe and Sound: A Sandy Hook Initiative - the pending nonprofit formed by six Sandy Hook mothers that has grown into a national advocate for school safety and security.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 22, 2014
Compared to the way the year started — 16 homicides in the first 12 days of January and 27 for the month — February has been quiet in Baltimore. We went more than a week without a single shooting. But given 2014's bloody start, the year-over-year increase in homicides in 2013 and the general exasperation in a city that keeps trying to get to a better place, a brief break in the action provides little reassurance. The big question lingers: Is there any hope of getting the homicide count down significantly, and in a lasting way?
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