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NEWS
By Mary Gale Hare and Mary Gale Hare,Sun reporter | March 11, 2007
James N. Purman, a World War II veteran and former Episcopal priest who became an addictions counselor, a house painter and curator for a municipal museum, died Monday of heart and circulatory disease at the home of his daughter in Wichita, Kan. The former Sykesville resident was 81. Mr. Purman served at parishes in Baltimore and as the rector of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church until he left the ministry in 1973 to work in counseling. He also maintained a painting business that ultimately led him to the Gatehouse Museum in Sykesville.
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NEWS
By Mary Gale Hare and Mary Gale Hare,Sun reporter | March 11, 2007
James N. Purman, a World War II veteran and former Episcopal priest who became an addictions counselor, a house painter and curator for a municipal museum, died Monday of heart and circulatory disease at the home of his daughter in Wichita, Kan. The former Sykesville resident was 81. Mr. Purman served at parishes in Baltimore and as the rector of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church until he left the ministry in 1973 to work in counseling. He also maintained a painting business that ultimately led him to the Gatehouse Museum in Sykesville.
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NEWS
By Debra Taylor-Young and Debra Taylor-Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2000
JIM PURMAN SAYS his job is a natural for him and he takes great pride in it. He is the archivist and curator of Sykesville Gatehouse Museum. The museum is a historic building that once was the "gate" or entrance to Springfield State Hospital. After being abandoned by the state, the town of Sykesville purchased the building for $1, with the intention of converting it into a museum. According to Purman, the original gatehouse collection was housed in two rooms in Sykesville Town House called Rooms of History.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2003
After spending half of his life behind prison walls for the 1987 murder of a fellow Carroll County high school student, Brian M. Tracy was found hanged early yesterday in his cell at a Jessup prison in an apparent suicide. Tracy, 32, was pronounced dead about 1 a.m. at North Laurel Hospital, about 40 minutes after a correctional officer found him hanged in his single-bunk cell at the Maryland House of Correction, according to Mark Vernarelli, spokesman for the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | April 21, 1991
Tiny stars still twinkle on the ceiling of Richard Purman's bedroom.A UFO sticker, as if frozen in flight, still glows when the lights are extinguished.But most nights, no one is there to see them.Sometimes Jim Purman sleeps there because it's warmer in that part of the house on South Klee Mill Road. Sometimes he goes there to think about his 17-year-old son, Richard, murdered by classmates for his car in 1987.Marilyn Monroe peers seductively from one wall. An old copy of Andy Warhol's Interview magazine lies askew on the floor.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
The Gatehouse Museum in Sykesville begins its third year with a freshly painted exterior, restored rooms and laden with gifts and volunteers. But, the century-old building needs assistance from town coffers to rid it of unwelcome guests.James N. Purman, archivist and curator, reported all the good news to the Town Council recently. The museum, once the gateway to the state-owned Springfield Hospital Center and now on long-term lease to Sykesville, has welcomed more than 1,200 visitors since September 1998.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | December 8, 1991
A confident, emotionless Brian R. Jordan turned to the family of the Sykesville youth he was convicted of killing and told them he knew he could not expect their mercy.The father of the murdered Richard Purman took the stand later last week and wondered what mercy he and his family might be shown by the court.Now the families of murderer and victim wait to see whether a judge will show Jordan mercy and reduce his sentence, handed down in March 1989, of two life terms plus 20 years at the Maryland State Penitentiary.
NEWS
May 30, 2003
On May 22, 2003 WILLIAM WHITEHEAD MICHAUX, clinical psychologist, devoted husband of the late Mary Helen Michaux; father of the late William M. Michaux. Graveside services will be held Saturday, May 31 11:30 a.m. at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, Forsythe Road, Sykesville. Those desiring more information may contact Jim Purman 410-795-4184.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | November 6, 1991
The dust of the old ones' bonesdrifts on the wind,whispers through the trees,their songs no longer heardamid the deafening desecration.S. V. AshmanELDERSBURG -- The cold wind blew gently Sunday as James Purman and other friends of the old Trinity Episcopal cemetery visited the site where the church's founding fathers and other relatives are buried.Nearly 25 people who have contributed either time or money to the restoration of the old cemetery closed their eyes and listened to Ashman's poem, as Purman set the scene for their trip through time.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
Jim Purman has been through the routine before, watching his son's killers plead for shorter sentences and new trials in courtrooms from Westminster to Annapolis for six years.Brian Richard Jordan and Brian Matthew Tracy have sought adjustments before in their double-life sentences for the 1987 murder of 17-year-old Richard Purman. But the recent move by a trio of Anne Arundel Circuit judges to halve Jordan's term has left Mr. Purman almost numb."I'm really speechless," he said last week of the May 20 decision to allow Jordan to serve his two life sentences concurrently rather than consecutively.
NEWS
May 30, 2003
On May 22, 2003 WILLIAM WHITEHEAD MICHAUX, clinical psychologist, devoted husband of the late Mary Helen Michaux; father of the late William M. Michaux. Graveside services will be held Saturday, May 31 11:30 a.m. at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, Forsythe Road, Sykesville. Those desiring more information may contact Jim Purman 410-795-4184.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2002
THE SYKESVILLE Gate House Museum of History recently retrieved a piece of Sykesville's past with the arrival of a small package containing a Bible printed in 1843, which, according to written entries, belonged to a former resident of the town. No one knows the journey the Bible might have taken through the years before it became the property of a Florida woman named Erica Barrett. Barrett told assistant curator Jim Purman that she purchased the Bible five or six years ago at a yard sale or flea market.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor-Young and Debra Taylor-Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2000
JIM PURMAN SAYS his job is a natural for him and he takes great pride in it. He is the archivist and curator of Sykesville Gatehouse Museum. The museum is a historic building that once was the "gate" or entrance to Springfield State Hospital. After being abandoned by the state, the town of Sykesville purchased the building for $1, with the intention of converting it into a museum. According to Purman, the original gatehouse collection was housed in two rooms in Sykesville Town House called Rooms of History.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
The Gatehouse Museum in Sykesville begins its third year with a freshly painted exterior, restored rooms and laden with gifts and volunteers. But, the century-old building needs assistance from town coffers to rid it of unwelcome guests.James N. Purman, archivist and curator, reported all the good news to the Town Council recently. The museum, once the gateway to the state-owned Springfield Hospital Center and now on long-term lease to Sykesville, has welcomed more than 1,200 visitors since September 1998.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
The Gatehouse Museum in Sykesville offers visitors glimpses of the town's history through photographs, archives and memorabilia.Even the location of the municipal museum on Cooper Drive has strong ties to the town's past. The two-story building once marked the entry to Springfield Hospital Center, founded in 1896. At its peak, the hospital employed nearly 3,000 people, many of them town residents. Much of the museum furniture, including the conference table and office chairs, came from the hospital.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1997
Sykesville has a new caretaker for its Gatehouse and a new administrator for an abandoned schoolhouse, two aging buildings being restored as town museums.One of the century-old buildings will house the local historical collection. The other will be a reminder of a time when the one-room structure was the only school for black children in southern Carroll and western Howard counties.Volunteer labor and about $37,000 in state grant money have helped both projects.Volunteers under the direction of the Sykesville Historic District Commission have been renovating the Gatehouse, once the main entrance to Springfield Hospital Center, for nearly two years.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Darren Allen and Joe Mathews and Darren Allen,Sun Staff Writers | June 19, 1994
Two Maryland state troopers testified Friday in Carroll Circuit Court that they had acted properly and had made no offers of leniency during the November 1987 arrest of Brian Matthew Tracy, who was later convicted of murder.Tracy, who has served six years of his two life-term sentence, has charged that prosecutors, police and Carroll Circuit Judge Donald J. Gilmore, now retired, deprived him of several constitutional rights.He is seeking to have his convictions overturned, his sentence vacated and his case retried.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
The Gatehouse Museum in Sykesville offers visitors glimpses of the town's history through photographs, archives and memorabilia.Even the location of the municipal museum on Cooper Drive has strong ties to the town's past. The two-story building once marked the entry to Springfield Hospital Center, founded in 1896. At its peak, the hospital employed nearly 3,000 people, many of them town residents. Much of the museum furniture, including the conference table and office chairs, came from the hospital.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun Staff Writer | October 28, 1994
Topper Ellis draws for fun while opposing football coaches draw out of frustration trying to sketch a defense to stop him.Purman Topper Ellis III is North County's senior ace back in the Knights' run-and-shoot, loves art and hopes to get into computer graphics.The 5-foot-7, 155-pound Ellis has rushed for an Anne Arundel County public school-leading 1,059 yards on 116 attempts, an average of 9.2, and has scored 13 touchdowns in leading the No. 10 Knights to a 5-2 record.Ellis' most prolific game came two weeks ago when he rushed for 304 yards and scored five touchdowns as the Knights hammered Severna Park, 46-26.
NEWS
July 1, 1994
Hickman to run for re-electionCarroll State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman announced his bid for a fifth term as the county's top prosecutor yesterday."During this term of office, our staff has continued to make Carroll County a very bad place for criminals," he said during a news conference.Mr. Hickman, 47, said his office has made strides in the prosecution of drug crimes and child sexual abuse. He proposed setting up a breaking-and-entering patrol, and he said that "a surprise" addition to the child abuse and sexual assault unit would be announced in August.
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