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By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | October 12, 1997
American football, which evolved from soccer and rugby, was developed on college campuses in the Northeast beginning in 1880. The first intercollegiate "football" game, between Rutgers and Princeton in 1869, actually was a soccer match.The early games were violent, filled with pushing and shoving.James Bowen, a mechanical-bank designer for J&E Stevens of Cromwell, Conn., created a cast-iron football bank named "A Calamity," which featured three players. The ball carrier moved forward when a coin was placed in the slot.
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BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 22, 2009
Thomas Streett patiently waited in a cubicle at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium on a recent Saturday as a sales associate examined two gold rings and a gold pocket watch he brought in for sale. The verdict: The high school ring he bought in 1955 for $17 fetched $186. The wedding band from a marriage that ended more than 40 years ago was worth about $65. His grandfather's watch was merely gold-filled, and Smyth wasn't interested. But Streett was pleased. "Obviously, if I had known in 1955 how much gold was going to be worth, I would have bought a half-dozen class rings and stashed them away," says the 73-year-old retiree, who plans to use the cash on a trip to Las Vegas next month.
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BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 22, 2009
Thomas Streett patiently waited in a cubicle at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium on a recent Saturday as a sales associate examined two gold rings and a gold pocket watch he brought in for sale. The verdict: The high school ring he bought in 1955 for $17 fetched $186. The wedding band from a marriage that ended more than 40 years ago was worth about $65. His grandfather's watch was merely gold-filled, and Smyth wasn't interested. But Streett was pleased. "Obviously, if I had known in 1955 how much gold was going to be worth, I would have bought a half-dozen class rings and stashed them away," says the 73-year-old retiree, who plans to use the cash on a trip to Las Vegas next month.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2001
Senior attackman David Ulrich did not know a thing about Notre Dame lacrosse until six years ago, after the Irish had won their first NCAA tournament game in school history. Ulrich, a Boys' Latin sophomore at the time, later would pay Notre Dame a recruiting visit. Before he met academic advisers and spent time with other students and got a taste of the rich sports tradition in South Bend, Ind., Ulrich sensed a natural fit with an up-and-coming coach who was building something special.
BUSINESS
By Gene Meyer and Gene Meyer,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 1997
THE GOLD RUSH is back.But this time around, low prices are driving the demand for the precious metal, industry sources say.That's a significant change from the late 1970s, when fears surrounding double-digit inflation drove prices to a record $875 an ounce.This summer's recent drop to a 12-year low of $318.10 an ounce has pushed sales of U.S. American Eagle gold coins more than three times higher than normal for June and July, reports Jack Szcerban of the U.S. Mint in Washington."Bargain hunters are buying," Szcerban said.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 27, 1997
I am the second wife of a successful businessman. He is a patron of the opera in our city, and we are going to the annual opera gala, the social event of the year. It is always covered by the newspapers and last year my husband's first wife had her picture prominently displayed on the society pages. This year, she is the chairwoman of the event. She is competitive and extremely sophisticated, but I plan to meet her toe-to-toe.What is your advice on a knockout dress that will get me on the front page this time?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 3, 1994
How do you take $40,000 worth of gilded picture frames, in sections up to 25 1/2 feet long, from Baltimore to Philadelphia? Very carefully.And in a school bus.That's how they went yesterday from the gold leaf studio of R. Wayne Reynolds on Falls Road to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where the frames will be joined with two huge paintings by early American artist Benjamin West.For many years the paintings -- "Christ Rejected" (1814) and "Death on the Pale Horse" (1817) -- have had only simple black strip frames.
NEWS
March 4, 1996
CAL RIPKEN JR.'S stirring consecutive games record last year? Makes us salivate for Opening Day. Magic Johnson's comeback from his HIV-related retirement? Inspirational. But it was another local sports story this winter that for us exemplified the meaning of sports heroism.Hamisi Amani-Dove, a 22-year-old soccer player from Columbia, played in the U.S. Olympic Festival in Denver last summer. As reported in a story by Laura Barnhardt in The Sun for Howard recently, Mr. Amani-Dove was coming off the field, fresh from receiving a bronze medal for his team's effort.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 4, 1994
The Philadelphia Orchestra returned to Baltimore Tuesday night to receive a thunderous standing ovation and three uproarious curtain calls for conductor Christoph Eschenbach after the triumphant conclusion of the finale of the Mahler Fifth Symphony.The last appearance here by this fabulous orchestra was on March 14, 1978, and one hopes that it won't take another 16 years to hear this world-class ensemble in the Meyerhoff again.This orchestra is one of the best in the list of great virtuoso ensembles.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
Nobody praises Virginia attackman Tucker Radebaugh for his speed or quickness. Yet he zips through a 2.1-mile course in 10 minutes, 15 seconds -- nearly two minutes faster than most of the Cavaliers.And few think of Radebaugh as one of Virginia's premier shooters. But he has racked up 90 career goals and could finish among the school's top five all-time scorers.So why is Radebaugh, a player without a true position and armed with average natural talent, among the best attackmen in the nation this season?
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 1, 1999
Forget Normandy. The longest day in war history is certainly the one depicted in "Three Kings," wherein three U.S. soldiers hunt for a cache of gold in the waning days of the Persian Gulf war."We'll leave at dawn and be back by lunch," Special Forces Capt. Archie Gates tells the three soldiers accompanying him on the caper. Well, not exactly. What starts out as a brash act of comeuppance -- the theft of several kilos of gold from Saddam Hussein, who in turn had stolen it from the Kuwaitis -- turns into a harrowing journey to the underside of the Iraqi conflict, where cynical humor, political intrigue, human pathos and good old-fashioned whoop-'em-up action coexist in a jangly balance.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
So you might celebrate Ernest Hemingway's 100th birthday today with suckling pig at Botin's off the Plaza Mayor in Madrid, or musing at the table in the Place St. Michel cafe in Paris where he wrote "Up in Michigan," or drinking daiquiris at La Floridita in Havana, where they were invented.But you might read a pretty good story called "Old Man at the Bridge."In a world inundated by bad Hemingway, much of which he wrote, sometimes published while he was alive ("Across the River and Into the Trees")
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
Nobody praises Virginia attackman Tucker Radebaugh for his speed or quickness. Yet he zips through a 2.1-mile course in 10 minutes, 15 seconds -- nearly two minutes faster than most of the Cavaliers.And few think of Radebaugh as one of Virginia's premier shooters. But he has racked up 90 career goals and could finish among the school's top five all-time scorers.So why is Radebaugh, a player without a true position and armed with average natural talent, among the best attackmen in the nation this season?
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Will Noel knows a treasure when he sees it. Lately he has been like a man just put down in Ali Baba's cave.The treasure Noel is contemplating these days is a thousand-year-old book, containing ideas that go even deeper in time. It is the most important ancient text ever to fall into the care of the Walters Art Gallery, where Noel is curator of manuscripts and rare books.It is a "palimpsest," a twice-used book. The Archimedes Palimpsest.The original texts in the book were inscribed in Greek in the 10th century, probably in Constantinople while it was still a capital of the Christian world, and before it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453 and became a capital of the Islamic world.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | October 12, 1997
American football, which evolved from soccer and rugby, was developed on college campuses in the Northeast beginning in 1880. The first intercollegiate "football" game, between Rutgers and Princeton in 1869, actually was a soccer match.The early games were violent, filled with pushing and shoving.James Bowen, a mechanical-bank designer for J&E Stevens of Cromwell, Conn., created a cast-iron football bank named "A Calamity," which featured three players. The ball carrier moved forward when a coin was placed in the slot.
BUSINESS
By Gene Meyer and Gene Meyer,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 1997
THE GOLD RUSH is back.But this time around, low prices are driving the demand for the precious metal, industry sources say.That's a significant change from the late 1970s, when fears surrounding double-digit inflation drove prices to a record $875 an ounce.This summer's recent drop to a 12-year low of $318.10 an ounce has pushed sales of U.S. American Eagle gold coins more than three times higher than normal for June and July, reports Jack Szcerban of the U.S. Mint in Washington."Bargain hunters are buying," Szcerban said.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Will Noel knows a treasure when he sees it. Lately he has been like a man just put down in Ali Baba's cave.The treasure Noel is contemplating these days is a thousand-year-old book, containing ideas that go even deeper in time. It is the most important ancient text ever to fall into the care of the Walters Art Gallery, where Noel is curator of manuscripts and rare books.It is a "palimpsest," a twice-used book. The Archimedes Palimpsest.The original texts in the book were inscribed in Greek in the 10th century, probably in Constantinople while it was still a capital of the Christian world, and before it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453 and became a capital of the Islamic world.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
Sometimes the most welcome gifts are those from unexpected sources. Peter Fonda, of all people, presents one in Victor Nunez's exquisite "Ulee's Gold." As a solitary Florida beekeeper who saves himself by reconstituting his family, Fonda gives a heartbreaking performance that is at once restrained and deeply felt. Spare of word, Fonda nonetheless conveys a lifetime of regret and yearning and also a hard-earned dignity. He is magnificent.It has been nearly 30 years since Fonda roared into cinematic prominence on a motorcycle in "Easy Rider," 30 years and an endless string of forgettable parts in mostly B-movies.
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