Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPure Country
IN THE NEWS

Pure Country

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 28, 1992
It's not the singer or the song: it's both.George Strait, the country-western legend, has just learned the saddest of all lessons when it comes to moving a high-flying, mega-successful singing career onto the silver screen: don't.Strait's first film, "Pure Country," which features the singer as a version of himself tired of all the phony glitz that surrounds his own craft and searching for a more authentic professional and emotional life, has hit the nation's box offices with a resounding thud.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | October 2, 2012
It's the last night of blind auditions, and each coach only has two spots left on their teams. You ready? Because the best moment in NBC's "The Voice" history happened tonight. Nathalie Hernandez, 15, from Florida with Taylor Swift's "White Horse" Christina Aguilera and Blake Shelton pushed their buttons within three notes of Nathalie's song, and Adam Levine soon followed. Adorable moment of the night: A simple smile and "thank you" when her song was finished. Not an iota of arrogance to this one, and I like it. Nathalie was splendid, but T. Swift isn't really my cup of tea -- still, she left quite an impression on the coaches, and she chose Christina.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
The photos of country music stars in their youth flash from the projector onto the screen like snatches of recovered memory. "I was trying in my own little way to stop time, if you will," says Leon Kagarise, his voice a bit wistful. "Stop time," he repeats. He started taking the pictures in the late 1950s when he was young, too. He's 62 now, but still buoyantly youthful when he talks about country music. "I loved the music so much," he says, "and I loved the people so much, the stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | April 17, 2012
"The Voice" is shaking things up a little bit for the audience. Tonight, contestants were subjected to instant eliminations, and two solid shocks ensued … after blind auditions, battle rounds and the first live culling of team members, four artists remain on each of the coaches' teams - but not for long. For the sake of recap, and my own sanity, those remaining at the start of tonight's episode on Teams Blake and Christina were are RaeLynn, Jermaine Paul, Jordis Unga and Erin Willett on Team Blake, and Ashley De La Rosa, Chris Mann, Lindsey Pavao and Jesse Campbell on Team Christina.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 23, 1992
When bitty little George Strait throws back his bitty little head and sings one of those sweet, sad cowboy songs of lost love or enduring friendship, "Pure Country" indeed achieves a kind of purity. Strait is instantly believable and instantly likable: little guy, looks as tough as brass ball bearings, his head almost gobbled up by a hat half the size of Texas, and the other half of him squeezed like toothpaste out of jeans so enameled to his scrawny frame you'd think he'd sing like a Vienna Choir boy. But he has a laid-back country grace and a hard little kernel of self-regard at the center of his presence, and that big old voice is as commanding as a blues saxophone.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 26, 1992
Although country music's appeal to children is about as old as the cord on Roy Acuff's yo-yo, Walt Disney Records has come up with a new way to revive that interest: top-shelf country-western singers crooning tunes specifically for kiddie cowpokes.Country-western music, with its family themes and folk roots, has long been a listening favorite of the under-12 set and their parents. And with its recent resurgence, families are doing their listening -- and concert-going -- together.From Mr. Acuff, who has played fiddle at the Grand Ole Opry for more than 50 years -- at times performing tricks with his yo-yo while singing -- to Riders in the Sky, a country-western trio with a Saturday morning television show, country music has been a family affair.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | October 2, 2012
It's the last night of blind auditions, and each coach only has two spots left on their teams. You ready? Because the best moment in NBC's "The Voice" history happened tonight. Nathalie Hernandez, 15, from Florida with Taylor Swift's "White Horse" Christina Aguilera and Blake Shelton pushed their buttons within three notes of Nathalie's song, and Adam Levine soon followed. Adorable moment of the night: A simple smile and "thank you" when her song was finished. Not an iota of arrogance to this one, and I like it. Nathalie was splendid, but T. Swift isn't really my cup of tea -- still, she left quite an impression on the coaches, and she chose Christina.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | April 17, 2012
"The Voice" is shaking things up a little bit for the audience. Tonight, contestants were subjected to instant eliminations, and two solid shocks ensued … after blind auditions, battle rounds and the first live culling of team members, four artists remain on each of the coaches' teams - but not for long. For the sake of recap, and my own sanity, those remaining at the start of tonight's episode on Teams Blake and Christina were are RaeLynn, Jermaine Paul, Jordis Unga and Erin Willett on Team Blake, and Ashley De La Rosa, Chris Mann, Lindsey Pavao and Jesse Campbell on Team Christina.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1998
MOUNT JOY TOWNSHIP, Pa. -- The golf course under construction just a 5-iron from the Mason-Dixon Line will be one of the most luxurious in the mid-Atlantic. Already emerging is a sweetly rolling, pond-skirted, mountain-ringed, emerald-green patch of pure pleasure, where -- forget the birdies -- even bogies promise to be beautiful.And all 18 holes of it burn Wilbur Waybright's stomach.The course, just off the northwest tip of Maryland's Carroll County, will be the ninth within a half-hour drive of the land that Waybright has farmed for most of his 73 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ELLEN SUNG and ELLEN SUNG,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2006
Keith Urban says he doesn't know why some critics target him. He never claimed to be a country music purist. The floppy-haired country megastar, who won his first Grammy earlier this month for the woeful breakup ballad "You'll Think of Me," has drawn fire from critics of crossover country-pop who think his music strays too far from the genre's roots. "You'll Think of Me" was originally penned for Joe Cocker; the only thing country about it is the twang that Urban added. "The influences I've had in country were more contemporary influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ELLEN SUNG and ELLEN SUNG,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 2006
Keith Urban says he doesn't know why some critics target him. He never claimed to be a country music purist. The floppy-haired country megastar, who won his first Grammy earlier this month for the woeful breakup ballad "You'll Think of Me," has drawn fire from critics of crossover country-pop who think his music strays too far from the genre's roots. "You'll Think of Me" was originally penned for Joe Cocker; the only thing country about it is the twang that Urban added. "The influences I've had in country were more contemporary influences.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
The photos of country music stars in their youth flash from the projector onto the screen like snatches of recovered memory. "I was trying in my own little way to stop time, if you will," says Leon Kagarise, his voice a bit wistful. "Stop time," he repeats. He started taking the pictures in the late 1950s when he was young, too. He's 62 now, but still buoyantly youthful when he talks about country music. "I loved the music so much," he says, "and I loved the people so much, the stars.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1998
MOUNT JOY TOWNSHIP, Pa. -- The golf course under construction just a 5-iron from the Mason-Dixon Line will be one of the most luxurious in the mid-Atlantic. Already emerging is a sweetly rolling, pond-skirted, mountain-ringed, emerald-green patch of pure pleasure, where -- forget the birdies -- even bogies promise to be beautiful.And all 18 holes of it burn Wilbur Waybright's stomach.The course, just off the northwest tip of Maryland's Carroll County, will be the ninth within a half-hour drive of the land that Waybright has farmed for most of his 73 years.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 28, 1992
It's not the singer or the song: it's both.George Strait, the country-western legend, has just learned the saddest of all lessons when it comes to moving a high-flying, mega-successful singing career onto the silver screen: don't.Strait's first film, "Pure Country," which features the singer as a version of himself tired of all the phony glitz that surrounds his own craft and searching for a more authentic professional and emotional life, has hit the nation's box offices with a resounding thud.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 23, 1992
When bitty little George Strait throws back his bitty little head and sings one of those sweet, sad cowboy songs of lost love or enduring friendship, "Pure Country" indeed achieves a kind of purity. Strait is instantly believable and instantly likable: little guy, looks as tough as brass ball bearings, his head almost gobbled up by a hat half the size of Texas, and the other half of him squeezed like toothpaste out of jeans so enameled to his scrawny frame you'd think he'd sing like a Vienna Choir boy. But he has a laid-back country grace and a hard little kernel of self-regard at the center of his presence, and that big old voice is as commanding as a blues saxophone.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | June 26, 1992
Although country music's appeal to children is about as old as the cord on Roy Acuff's yo-yo, Walt Disney Records has come up with a new way to revive that interest: top-shelf country-western singers crooning tunes specifically for kiddie cowpokes.Country-western music, with its family themes and folk roots, has long been a listening favorite of the under-12 set and their parents. And with its recent resurgence, families are doing their listening -- and concert-going -- together.From Mr. Acuff, who has played fiddle at the Grand Ole Opry for more than 50 years -- at times performing tricks with his yo-yo while singing -- to Riders in the Sky, a country-western trio with a Saturday morning television show, country music has been a family affair.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | August 13, 1991
If it were possible to do a gene scan for talent, the one that produces good country and western musicians would probably be colored blue, fit like a second skin, and be worn through at the knees.And, judging from her demo tape, someone like Marge Calhoun of Alexandria, Va., probably has an entire wardrobe hidden in her chromosomes, thanks to her father, who raised her on country music, and an ancestor whoonce rode for the Pony Express.Based on that, it was probably inevitable that she would one day have her own band, Marge Calhoun and the New Heartaches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 30, 1992
LIVEAC/DC (Atco 92212)theory, a live album ought to be the easiest kind to make, since the only thing to worry about is making sure the microphones are on. So why aren't more concert recordings as accurate or energetic as AC/DC's latest, the aptly titled "Live"? Some of the credit no doubt belongs with producer Bruce Fairbairn, who keeps the guitars crisp and the drums punchy, and it obviously doesn't hurt that the set list includes all of the band's best-loved material, from "Highway to Hell" to the recent "Thunderstruck."
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | August 13, 1991
If it were possible to do a gene scan for talent, the one that produces good country and western musicians would probably be colored blue, fit like a second skin, and be worn through at the knees.And, judging from her demo tape, someone like Marge Calhoun of Alexandria, Va., probably has an entire wardrobe hidden in her chromosomes, thanks to her father, who raised her on country music, and an ancestor whoonce rode for the Pony Express.Based on that, it was probably inevitable that she would one day have her own band, Marge Calhoun and the New Heartaches.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.