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BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | February 27, 2005
The worst day in the stock market in nearly seven months had very little to do with stocks. Tuesday's 174-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial average, according to most accounts, was sparked by an overblown report out of South Korea hinting that Seoul's appetite for U.S. dollars had declined. A hairline crack in the dike of the almighty dollar prompted Wall Street to shoot first and ask questions later. It was a wake-up call to ordinary investors. Most investors only recently have realized the advantage of holding fixed-income securities to diversify a stock portfolio.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., which owns or is in the process of acquiring 140 television stations throughout the U.S., is purchasing a manufacturer of transmission antennas, the Hunt Valley broadcast firm announced Tuesday. Dielectric, a Maine-based subsidiary of a North Carolina company, planned to stop operating at the end of the month. Parent company SPX Corp. decided in April to close the antenna maker because of low profitability, according to news reports. "Dielectric has supplied more than two-thirds of the TV industry's high power antennas and its name is synonymous with expert engineering and quality products," said David Smith, Sinclair's president and CEO, in a statement.
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NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to harness the purchasing power of the nation's 30 million African-Americans, a Baltimore group announced yesterday that it is teaming up with Key Federal Savings Bank and American Express to provide millions of dollars for black colleges.The organization, America's Black Colleges, is promoting a Visa credit card issued by the Havre de Grace bank that will contribute a small percentage of each transaction to a fund providing scholarships and awards to 115 historically black schools, including five in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | February 19, 2007
When her children were young, Jenny Lauck flipped on Today or Good Morning America as she brewed her morning coffee and tended her babies. But several years ago, the 34-year-old mother of three stopped watching the morning shows. After getting TiVo, she had no patience to sit through multiple commercial breaks during a live newscast. On top of that, the segments seemed frivolous. "Watching morning television for me is the equivalent of reading People magazine in the dentist's office," said Lauck, who writes for Web sites from her home in Santa Rosa, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Gail Marksjarvis and Gail Marksjarvis,Chicago Tribune | January 14, 2007
Whether your pockets are oozing with money or not, if you are an investor or homeowner you probably have been feasting on cash during the past few years. The world has been flush with it. Large flows of cash have been fueling a world economic boom, pushing stock markets globally to new heights, boosting the prices of everything from real estate to commodities, prompting record mergers and acquisitions and sending private equity firms on a buyout rampage. But some refer to current conditions as "excessive liquidity" - or an unusual abundance of easy cash.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to harness the purchasing power of the nation's 30 million African-Americans, a Baltimore group announced yesterday that it is teaming up with Key Federal Savings Bank and American Express to provide millions of dollars for black colleges.The organization, America's Black Colleges, is promoting a Visa credit card issued by the Havre de Grace bank that will contribute a small percentage of each transaction to a fund providing scholarships and awards to 115 historically black schools, including five colleges in Maryland.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
The stewed pigs' feet and salsa music were pure spice, but nothing said Latino like the pair of Spanish-speaking mortgage loan officers standing at a card table in Patterson Park. In a sign that corporate America is waking up to Hispanics' population growth and considerable purchasing power, the two-day Latino Fest 2001 opened yesterday with the most corporate backing the festival has had in its 21-year history, organizers said. "The first year, we had, like, $50 to our name," said Jose Ruiz, founder and former director of Education-Based Latino Outreach, which puts on the festival as a fund-raiser for its cultural and educational programs.
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2006
A consortium of government agencies, public schools, libraries and universities in the Baltimore area are forming a power purchasing cooperative to buy electricity in the fast-moving wholesale market in a bid to cut soaring energy costs, Baltimore Metropolitan Council officials said yesterday. The group of 20 local government entities hopes to obtain prices that are usually the domain of industry insiders and bulk buyers of power. They collectively hope to save up to $5 million annually.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service Staff writer James Bock contributed to this article | September 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The number of Americans living in poverty soared last year by 2.1 million to a total of 35.7 million, and the poverty rate rose for the second consecutive year, to 14.2 percent, the government reported yesterday.The new rate is the highest since the peak caused by the recession of the early 1980s. The actual number of poor people is the highest since 1964, when President Lyndon B. Johnson declared his "War on Poverty."In a disclosure that may be even more politically damaging to President Bush and his re-election campaign, the Census Bureau also said that the purchasing power of the typical U.S. household shrank last year by nearly $1,100.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | August 10, 1993
LET me crawl out on a limb and forecast that for all the fanfare and editorial praise, the slaying of the deficit will not ignite a recovery. By raising taxes and cutting taxes, the deficit-reduction deal reduces purchasing power by $80 billion next year alone. This contraction will dwarf the tonic effect of lower interest rates.Earlier this year, the Federal Reserve Board did cut rates. But despite lower interest rates, the economy grew at less than 2 percent in the first half of 1993.Lately, the Fed's Open Market Committee has voted twice in a row-- in May and July -- against any further monetary easing.
BUSINESS
By Gail Marksjarvis and Gail Marksjarvis,Chicago Tribune | January 14, 2007
Whether your pockets are oozing with money or not, if you are an investor or homeowner you probably have been feasting on cash during the past few years. The world has been flush with it. Large flows of cash have been fueling a world economic boom, pushing stock markets globally to new heights, boosting the prices of everything from real estate to commodities, prompting record mergers and acquisitions and sending private equity firms on a buyout rampage. But some refer to current conditions as "excessive liquidity" - or an unusual abundance of easy cash.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | March 5, 2006
Agriculture is big business in Maryland. Just how big, well that depends upon whom you ask. Officials at the Maryland Department of Agriculture add up what farmers are paid for their grain, livestock, milk and nursery products and declare that farms sales totaled $1.7 billion last year. But Maryland's top business advocate, Aris Melissaratos, the secretary of the Department of Business and Economic Development, would say they have the decimal point in the wrong place. He uses a broader definition of agriculture, one that includes all aspects of the production of food and fiber, and concludes that agriculture is Maryland's "oldest and largest industry."
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2006
A consortium of government agencies, public schools, libraries and universities in the Baltimore area are forming a power purchasing cooperative to buy electricity in the fast-moving wholesale market in a bid to cut soaring energy costs, Baltimore Metropolitan Council officials said yesterday. The group of 20 local government entities hopes to obtain prices that are usually the domain of industry insiders and bulk buyers of power. They collectively hope to save up to $5 million annually.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | February 27, 2005
The worst day in the stock market in nearly seven months had very little to do with stocks. Tuesday's 174-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial average, according to most accounts, was sparked by an overblown report out of South Korea hinting that Seoul's appetite for U.S. dollars had declined. A hairline crack in the dike of the almighty dollar prompted Wall Street to shoot first and ask questions later. It was a wake-up call to ordinary investors. Most investors only recently have realized the advantage of holding fixed-income securities to diversify a stock portfolio.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
The stewed pigs' feet and salsa music were pure spice, but nothing said Latino like the pair of Spanish-speaking mortgage loan officers standing at a card table in Patterson Park. In a sign that corporate America is waking up to Hispanics' population growth and considerable purchasing power, the two-day Latino Fest 2001 opened yesterday with the most corporate backing the festival has had in its 21-year history, organizers said. "The first year, we had, like, $50 to our name," said Jose Ruiz, founder and former director of Education-Based Latino Outreach, which puts on the festival as a fund-raiser for its cultural and educational programs.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is expected to announce today that it has created a new company with investment house Goldman, Sachs & Co. to buy power plants.The creation of Orion Power Holdings Inc. is intended to take advantage of the changing energy industry. It comes as several other utilities nationwide -- including Florida Power & Light Co. and U.S. Generating Co. -- already are working to acquire generating assets."This is a logical extension of what we set up with Constellation Power Source," said Charles W. Shivery, chief executive of the BGE subsidiary devoted to marketing power.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | January 29, 1992
THE HERD instinct in the press, always troublesome, is particularly hazardous in election years. A candidate is dubbed the presumptive front-runner, and the ensuing media attention helps create a bandwagon effect. Another candidate is pronounced as less than telegenic, and he is written off. The press decides that a third candidate is vulnerable to rumors about womanizing, and that abruptly becomes his issue.The press also plays follow-the-leader in how it frames election-year policy issues and tests of candidate soundness.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | October 30, 1991
DESPITE the Middle East peace conference, the gulf war victory and the Democrats' bungling of the Thomas hearings, polls are showing that George Bush is suddenly no longer a shoo-in for re-election because of the economy. The hard economic facts bear out voter intuition that the economy has gotten into trouble on George Bush's watch.In his 1988 acceptance speech, Bush, confidently assuming a two-term administration, pledged to create 35 million jobs by 1996. Actual net jobs created since 1989 are just over 200,000 -- the lowest rate of any postwar administration.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | August 10, 1993
LET me crawl out on a limb and forecast that for all the fanfare and editorial praise, the slaying of the deficit will not ignite a recovery. By raising taxes and cutting taxes, the deficit-reduction deal reduces purchasing power by $80 billion next year alone. This contraction will dwarf the tonic effect of lower interest rates.Earlier this year, the Federal Reserve Board did cut rates. But despite lower interest rates, the economy grew at less than 2 percent in the first half of 1993.Lately, the Fed's Open Market Committee has voted twice in a row-- in May and July -- against any further monetary easing.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to harness the purchasing power of the nation's 30 million African-Americans, a Baltimore group announced yesterday that it is teaming up with Key Federal Savings Bank and American Express to provide millions of dollars for black colleges.The organization, America's Black Colleges, is promoting a Visa credit card issued by the Havre de Grace bank that will contribute a small percentage of each transaction to a fund providing scholarships and awards to 115 historically black schools, including five colleges in Maryland.
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