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Puppy Mills

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NEWS
December 20, 2011
Thousands of puppies are bought and sold every year during the holiday season, which means thousands of consumers end up unknowingly supporting puppy mills. Puppy mills are inhumane, commercial breeding facilities that place an emphasis on profits over the health of the dogs they sell. The breeding dogs at puppy mills live their entire lives in cages, typically in deplorable conditions. As a result, their puppies are often unhealthy and can carry infectious diseases. Two recent investigations by The Humane Society of the United States demonstrate the wide-spread consumer fraud and abuse that characterize the industry.
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EXPLORE
March 20, 2012
So you want to get a puppy. Great! Now where should you go and what should you do? I would imagine that the owners of the new store in Columbia called "Charm City Puppies" would want you to immediately walk through their doors. Or the folks who manage "Today's Pet" would want you in their store. But are there other, better options? If you were to ask me the question of where you should get your puppy, my answer would be to head to Columbia's animal shelter — the Howard County Animal Control and Adoption Facility (HCAC)
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NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM and SARA ENGRAM,Sara Engram is editorial page director of The Evening Sun. Her column appears here each week | February 2, 1992
Good intentions don't guarantee good laws. A good example comes from Rep. Ben Cardin, not usually known for proposing bad legislation.Mr. Cardin is principal sponsor of a bill designed, he says, to protect consumers from the questionable practices of the notorious puppy mills that supply many pet shops. Plenty of families have taken home an adorable puppy only to find themselves saddled later with some big problems.Puppy mills -- and the "lemon" puppies they inevitably produce -- are indeed a problem.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
Thousands of puppies are bought and sold every year during the holiday season, which means thousands of consumers end up unknowingly supporting puppy mills. Puppy mills are inhumane, commercial breeding facilities that place an emphasis on profits over the health of the dogs they sell. The breeding dogs at puppy mills live their entire lives in cages, typically in deplorable conditions. As a result, their puppies are often unhealthy and can carry infectious diseases. Two recent investigations by The Humane Society of the United States demonstrate the wide-spread consumer fraud and abuse that characterize the industry.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Max-a-million had a deprived puppyhood.Raised in squalor and neglect at a Nebraska "puppy mill," the 4-year-old cocker spaniel wound up in Baltimore. But his sorry Midwestern life haunted him -- and his owner -- through health problems that required three bladder operations.Max-a-million is his name "because that's what he's costing me," said Theresa Pulice-Wingate yesterday. The 28-year-old Baltimore woman's "nightmare" began 2 1/2 years ago and included a $2,500 veterinarian's bill.
NEWS
By Nicole Weisensee and Nicole Weisensee,States News Service | November 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Donna Wynkoop bought her Shi-tzu, Petie, in July from a pet store in Annapolis. Two weeks later, the dog began having seizures.Wynkoop, of Crofton, took Petie to a veterinarian who told her the dog had water on the brain.Medical services already have cost her $700.Wynkoop's story is similar to those told by many people who purchase pets bred in "puppy mills" and sold by pet stores.She was at Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin's side yesterday when he announced that he has introduced a bill to crack down on pet stores that sell unhealthy dogs bred in puppy mills.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
The name of the proposed pet shop on York Road in Towson is Just Puppies. Beyond that, things get a little complicated. Residents, including representatives of private shelters, want to block the store, part of a family-operated chain that includes a Laurel outlet, because it plans to stock up to 60 puppies at a time. The opponents say the store cannot provide such a high volume of dogs without resorting to "puppy mills" -- large commercial breeders that produce dogs more prone to disease and temperament problems.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | December 20, 1992
About 20 animal-rights activists demonstrated outside The Mall in Columbia yesterday as part of a nationwide protest of the Docktor Pet Center and Petland because they believe the chains get puppies from filthy breeding farms.A Docktor Pet official denied the charge.Carrying signs reading "Canine Hell," and "Puppy Mills Kill," members of the Maryland Forum for Animals picketed at the mall because Docktor Pet Center, one of the nation's largest pet store chains, has a store there.The Petland chain has at least one Maryland store.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 11, 2000
Mounting legal costs have caused the owner of Just Puppies, a Laurel-based pet shop, to abandon a plan to open a store in Towson. Mitchell Thomson said he could not afford to continue pursuing the necessary zoning for the store against legal appeals backed by private animal shelters and others who contend Just Puppies gets its stock from "puppy mills" - large commercial breeders whose dogs are considered by some to be prone to disease and temperament problems....
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE INSIDE THE CIA: REVEALING THE SECRETS OF THE WORLD'S MOST POWERFUL SPY AGENCY. and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE INSIDE THE CIA: REVEALING THE SECRETS OF THE WORLD'S MOST POWERFUL SPY AGENCY.,LOS ANGELES TIMES FOR LOVE ALONE | January 17, 1993
TC : BLOODLINES.Susan Conant.Doubleday Perfect Crime.271 pages. $17.Everyone knows that mysteries and cats go together, right? The popularity of Susan Conant's Dog Lovers' Mystery series proves there's also an audience for tales combining canines and crime. In her sixth novel, people may get murdered, but dogs are guaranteed a happy ending -- she says so in the first chapter. If a dog died, "I wouldn't want to hear about it," she declares, and "I wouldn't ask you to listen. Honest to God spelled backward."
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | August 11, 2009
Jasika Scruggs wasn't in the market for another dog. But while at the shelter for an event, she saw those layers of marshmallow cream fur and the leathery black button for a nose, and she dropped to her knees in front of the cage. It was, as she says, love at first sight. At second sight ... well, Scruggs is seeing the pup quite differently. The Labradoodle she named June didn't eat for the first week. It was days before she relieved herself. She made no eye contact. The dog's separation anxiety is so profound, Scruggs says, she wreaks havoc if left alone, even for just a few minutes.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 11, 2000
Mounting legal costs have caused the owner of Just Puppies, a Laurel-based pet shop, to abandon a plan to open a store in Towson. Mitchell Thomson said he could not afford to continue pursuing the necessary zoning for the store against legal appeals backed by private animal shelters and others who contend Just Puppies gets its stock from "puppy mills" - large commercial breeders whose dogs are considered by some to be prone to disease and temperament problems....
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
The name of the proposed pet shop on York Road in Towson is Just Puppies. Beyond that, things get a little complicated. Residents, including representatives of private shelters, want to block the store, part of a family-operated chain that includes a Laurel outlet, because it plans to stock up to 60 puppies at a time. The opponents say the store cannot provide such a high volume of dogs without resorting to "puppy mills" -- large commercial breeders that produce dogs more prone to disease and temperament problems.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1993
GAP, Pa. -- Amos K. Stoltzfus is one of the bearded, straw-hatted Amish farmers whose 19th-century lifestyle has been romanticized nearly as often as the Amish horse-drawn buggies have been pictured on postcards and photographed by tourists here in Lancaster County.But now animal rights advocates have accused Amish farmers like Mr. Stoltzfus of breeding dogs in a cruel way and flooding the market with puppies that are sometimes maladjusted and sick.Pennsylvania dog officers and humane agents say they have found many Amish breeders who violate health, shelter and sanitary standards for kennels.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE INSIDE THE CIA: REVEALING THE SECRETS OF THE WORLD'S MOST POWERFUL SPY AGENCY. and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE INSIDE THE CIA: REVEALING THE SECRETS OF THE WORLD'S MOST POWERFUL SPY AGENCY.,LOS ANGELES TIMES FOR LOVE ALONE | January 17, 1993
TC : BLOODLINES.Susan Conant.Doubleday Perfect Crime.271 pages. $17.Everyone knows that mysteries and cats go together, right? The popularity of Susan Conant's Dog Lovers' Mystery series proves there's also an audience for tales combining canines and crime. In her sixth novel, people may get murdered, but dogs are guaranteed a happy ending -- she says so in the first chapter. If a dog died, "I wouldn't want to hear about it," she declares, and "I wouldn't ask you to listen. Honest to God spelled backward."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | December 20, 1992
About 20 animal-rights activists demonstrated outside The Mall in Columbia yesterday as part of a nationwide protest of the Docktor Pet Center and Petland because they believe the chains get puppies from filthy breeding farms.A Docktor Pet official denied the charge.Carrying signs reading "Canine Hell," and "Puppy Mills Kill," members of the Maryland Forum for Animals picketed at the mall because Docktor Pet Center, one of the nation's largest pet store chains, has a store there.The Petland chain has at least one Maryland store.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Max-a-million had a deprived puppyhood.Raised in squalor and neglect at a Nebraska "puppy mill," the 4-year-old cocker spaniel wound up in Baltimore. But his sorry Midwestern life haunted him -- and his owner -- through health problems that required three bladder operations.Max-a-million is his name "because that's what he's costing me," said Theresa Pulice-Wingate yesterday. The 28-year-old Baltimore woman's "nightmare" began 2 1/2 years ago and included a $2,500 veterinarian's bill.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Christopher Lynch, legislative aide to Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, assured an audience of 150 dog breeders last week that the Puppy Protection Act which Mr. Cardin introduced to Congress would not go forward as written.That was good news to the dog breeders and members of the Dog Owners Guild of Maryland (D.O.G.), who met recently at Seton-Keough High School to hear Mr. Lynch. While the dog fanciers -- breeders -- have no complaints about the bill's (HR3718) intent to protect buyers of faulty puppies, they object to the way it is written.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Christopher Lynch, legislative aide to Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, assured an audience of 150 dog breeders last week that the Puppy Protection Act which Mr. Cardin introduced to Congress would not go forward as written.That was good news to the dog breeders and members of the Dog Owners Guild of Maryland (D.O.G.), who met recently at Seton-Keough High School to hear Mr. Lynch. While the dog fanciers -- breeders -- have no complaints about the bill's (HR3718) intent to protect buyers of faulty puppies, they object to the way it is written.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM and SARA ENGRAM,Sara Engram is editorial page director of The Evening Sun. Her column appears here each week | February 2, 1992
Good intentions don't guarantee good laws. A good example comes from Rep. Ben Cardin, not usually known for proposing bad legislation.Mr. Cardin is principal sponsor of a bill designed, he says, to protect consumers from the questionable practices of the notorious puppy mills that supply many pet shops. Plenty of families have taken home an adorable puppy only to find themselves saddled later with some big problems.Puppy mills -- and the "lemon" puppies they inevitably produce -- are indeed a problem.
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