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By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 11, 2010
A scene from the near future: Augustus Merryweather IV glanced up at the tapping on his office door. Harvey Carbunkle stood there in bowtie and shirtsleeves, smiling eagerly from behind horn-rimmed glasses. Augustus sighed. He hated this part of the job. It was never fun to let people go. He waved the young man to a seat and spoke without preamble. "Harvey, I'm afraid it's not working out." The eager face fell like a refrigerator from a moving truck. "You're firing me?"
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Donald E. McBrien, former director of pupil services for Howard County public schools who earlier held the same position in Baltimore County public schools, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at St. Agnes Hospital. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 79. "Don was a good friend and perfect for that job because he had great empathy for people who needed guidance or help," said Robert Y. Dubel, who headed Baltimore County public schools for 16 years until retiring in 1992.
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NEWS
March 20, 2005
Carole Janesko, principal of West Meade Elementary School, kisses Pam the Ham, a potbellied pig, at a school program. The smooch was bestowed Wednesday to recognize pupils' reading and test-taking efforts.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
The Baltimore school system ranked second among the nation's 100 largest school districts in how much it spent per pupil in fiscal year 2011, according to data released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The city's $15,483 per-pupil expenditure was second to New York City's $19,770. Rounding out the top five were Montgomery County, which spent $15,421; Milwaukee public schools at $14,244; and Prince George's County public schools, which spent $13,775. The Census Bureau also noted the first decrease in per-pupil spending nationally since 1977, the year the figures were first tracked.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 19, 2000
During the lazy, hazy days of mid-July, one wouldn't expect to find much going on at school. Families are vacationing or relaxing poolside, kids are sleeping late and hanging out at the mall. But at Mount View Middle School this week, 20 incoming sixth-graders will attend Camp PreView at the Marriottsville school. Special Education Team Leader Nan Brown started the camp three years ago for kids who need extra support to make the transition from elementary to middle school. According to Brown, some schoolchildren experience quite a bit of anxiety thinking about entering middle school, and she says the camp experience "eliminates a tremendous amount of fear" for pupils and their parents.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 1999
RUBE GOLDBERG was an American cartoonist whose idea of fun was solving simple problems in ridiculously complicated ways.Long ago, Lolly Schorreck, Severn School sixth-grade science teacher, recognized the educational value of these funny solutions.So, she's challenged her pupils this year to "put cereal in a bowl" as Goldberg would have done it.On March 19 in the Great Room of Severn School, the pupils' working inventions will be on display from 1: 15 p.m. to 2: 15 p.m.The work is the culmination of an annual assignment by Schorreck, a 13-year veteran at Severn, who uses the project to explain all sorts of physical and scientific facts in an entertaining way.The pupils must name their inventions, and use at least eight steps and at least three simple machines (lever, wedge, screw, wheel and axle, gears or pulley)
NEWS
November 22, 1998
The Maryland Center for the Book at the Howard County library, the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress and Weekly Reader Corp. are sponsoring a contest, "1999 Letters About Literature," in which pupils write a letter to an author -- living or dead -- explaining how the author's book changed their view of the world.Winners at the national level will receive $1,000 savings bonds. First-place winners in Maryland will receive $100 awards.Entries are divided into Level I, for pupils in grades four through seven, and Level II for grades eight through 12.The deadline for the contest is Dec. 18.An entry form may be obtained by calling the center in Columbia at 410-313-7750, or online at www.howa.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2002
IT LOOKED LIKE a run on the bank during a recent Monday morning at Elmer Wolfe Elementary School. But the pupils were in the school's cafeteria making deposits in their savings accounts at the Big Bad Wolfe Bank. It wasn't play money, either. "It's their money and they are proud of it," said Lisa Monthley, who helps coordinate the program for New Windsor State Bank. "It's different banking with your peers." The program helps pupils understand the meaning of saving money, Monthley said.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 1998
THE GIVING SPIRIT OF Christmas is flourishing at Oklahoma Road Middle School. Pupils at the Eldersburg school have been working to create a town scene dubbed Winter Wonderland.More than a dozen pupils in a group called the Partners Club have spent the past two weeks working on the display, which covers about 50 square feet. Pupils in the club spend time during their skills class working with pupils in teacher Lois Dolan's Learning for Independence class.I visited the Winter Wonderland display last week as the children were putting finishing touches on their work.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 1998
MURRAY HILL Middle School is busy winding down its first year. Apart from the awkwardness of functioning in a new school -- with new staff, pupils and PTA -- the school community has had to deal with the unfinished facility and outdoor area. In spite of the difficulties inherent in new beginnings, pupils, staff and parents created a lively learning environment. For example, Murray Hill was well represented at the exhibition in celebration of Youth Art Month, "Informed by the Combination of Image and Text," at the Howard County Center for the Arts in Ellicott City.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
In the beginning, there was just a man, a ball and a tire on a rope. Really, Alan Mills, now the Aberdeen IronBirds' new pitching coach, probably thought it was the beginning of the end. By the end of the 1989 season, Mills had pitched for four seasons, primarily in the New York Yankees organization, and he hadn't climbed out of Single-A. One coach in the organization spelled it out for Mills: like so many minor-league pitchers, he simply wasn't throwing enough strikes to make anything of himself.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
The Baltimore City school board voted Tuesday to pass the district's proposed $1.31 billion budget, which includes a decrease in the per-pupil funding for charter schools. As the amount spent on students in traditional schools increases, the system's 33 charter schools will see their per-pupil expenditures drop by $257 from 2012, for a total of $9,007. The overall amount for charters, however, has steadily increased as their populations grow. The charters are funded differently than traditional schools.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
Southern Anne Arundel County residents whose children would be affected by the redistricting of three elementary schools offered emotional testimony before the county school board Tuesday night, with most arguing that the redistricting isn't necessary. Dozens turned out for the hearing at South River High School regarding Superintendent Kevin Maxwell's recommendation, which would shift some pupils from Central to Davidsonville and Mayo elementary schools to relieve overcrowding. Most speakers were parents of pupils at Central Elementary.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Nicole Pace told the school nurse that her daughter was deathly allergic to peanuts and had her 5-year-old's allergist provide Hillcrest Elementary School in Frederick with a pre-measured dose of medicine, just in case. But a cafeteria worker - unaware of the danger peanuts posed to the girl, Liana - gave her a peanut butter sandwich. "The child immediately began experiencing an anaphylactic reaction; her airway and eyelids began to swell, and she became lethargic and confused," according to court records.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Go purple, or go to the library. That was the warning some teachers issued to parents at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School regarding student participation at Friday's Ravens-sponsored pep rally in advance of the team's conference championship game Sunday against the New England Patriots. "Students must wear purple or Ravens attire to attend, as there will be many TV cameras there," one teacher wrote to parents in an email obtained by The Baltimore Sun. "Not wearing purple or Ravens attire means making a choice not to attend.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
An Anne Arundel County Schools committee voted Tuesday night to move pupils from several communities in Riva to Mayo and Davidsonville elementary schools to ease crowding at Edgewater's Central Elementary School. Under the proposed plan, Central students from the Waterford, Annapolis Landing and Berkshire communities would be moved to Davidsonville Elementary. Central students living along Muddy Creek Road down to Wolfe's Reserve and south of Central Avenue from Muddy Creek Road to the Mayo boundary would move to Mayo Elementary.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2001
The latest explosion of high school violence occurred in California thousands of miles away, but last month's shootings at a school near San Diego brought fear to students in Howard County, just the same. Harper's Choice Middle School pupils talked last night about the violence and their fears that it could happen here in an extraordinary dialogue with adults, including educators, politicians, parents and other members of the community. "We hope to try to avoid violence in Howard County schools and come up with programs to help schools discuss school violence," seventh-grader Kamille Guinn, one of the forum's student organizers, said this week.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2001
TANEYTOWN ELEMENTARY School's Family Reading Night drew a large crowd of parents and pupils last week and featured the school's three county-level winners of the State of Maryland International Reading Association's Young Authors Contest. The young authors, second-grader Molly Devilbiss and third-graders Rebecca Haines and Jessica Stonesifer, read their work at this family event. The program started with several educators explaining strategies used in reading, then included the young authors reading their work.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 18, 2011
Dr. Joseph Giardina, a retired Baltimore County dentist who was an early advocate for understanding the educational needs of dyslexic students, died of kidney failure Sept. 9 at his Phoenix, Baltimore County, home. He was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Fayette Street, he was a 1948 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he played football. He remained active in the school's alumni association. While in the Army and serving in Germany, he also competed on a military football team.
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