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Punitive Damages

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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer C. Fraser Smith contributed to this article | March 11, 1996
The administrative judge of Baltimore Circuit Court says the firm of attorney Peter G. Angelos sought his support for legislation that could affect punitive damages awarded in thousands of asbestos cases pending in the city court. FFTC Last week, Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan said that he once considered taking a position on the bill. After the initial contact, he asked an Angelos attorney to have other lawyers for asbestos victims send him letters about whether they had ever collected on a judgment for punitive damages on behalf of their clients.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | February 11, 2014
Under Armour and Nike Inc. have agreed to settle a trademark infringement lawsuit in which the Baltimore-based sports apparel brand accused its rival of illegally using versions of the "I Will" slogan. "The litigation has been resolved on a confidential and mutually agreeable basis," Under Armour said in a statement Tuesday. UPDATE: Nike spokeswoman Mary Remuzzi issued the same statement and said the company had no further comment. An order approved Monday by Judge Ellen L. Hollander in U.S. District Court in Baltimore dismisses the Feb. 21 complaint.
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NEWS
March 20, 1992
One of the most hotly contested issues at the General Assembly this session has been a proposal to impose on victims harsh burdens of proof and evidence in order to collect punitive damages from corporate wrongdoers.It would require that plaintiffs not only prove that a company engaged in heinous conduct, but that a manager or principal of the company involved committed, knew about or sanctioned that wrongdoing. Awards would have to be commensurate with the harm caused.Proponents claim this bill would add a measure of predictability to punitive damage awards, which on occasion are outrageous.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Nearly a year after Maryland's highest court tossed out most of a $1.65 billion jury verdict against ExxonMobil Corp. in connection with a 2006 underground gasoline leak in northern Baltimore County, 43 families have settled their cases rather than return for new trials. Theodore M. Flerlage Jr., a lawyer for the plaintiffs, said Monday that two groups that had been scheduled for trial this past Monday and next Monday have settled their cases. They're the latest of four groups that have settled this month, leaving about 50 cases to be resolved.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled 8-1 yesterday that punitive damages -- a sometimes costly addition to actual damages verdicts -- may be awarded under the standard arbitration agreement used by many stockbrokers.Unless a broker and an investor make a specific contractual promise to each other that punitive damages will be excluded if they get into a dispute, their agreement to follow the securities industry's usual arbitration rules leaves that option open, the court said.A punitive damages award is intended to punish a wrongdoer and to deter others from causing the same kind of harm.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | February 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A bill to give Maryland businesses more protection against lawsuits seeking punitive damages cleared its first major hurdle yesterday by surviving a vote in a House committee.The House Judiciary Committee voted 12-10 in favor of House Bill 329, considered one of the most important pieces of business-related legislation this session.The committee's approval sets the stage for what both sides expect to be a bitter and protracted battle as it comes up for a vote later this week in the full House of Delegates.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | October 8, 1994
U.S. District Senior Judge Alexander Harvey II yesterday dismissed a claim for punitive damages against Host Marriott Corp., but agreed to continue a bondholders' suit for $18 million in compensatory damages against the Bethesda-based hotel owner.At the end of the second week of testimony in a federal securities fraud case, Judge Harvey said there was not enough evidence to support a common law fraud claim against Host and its predecessor, the Marriott Corp., which has been accused of illegally concealing from bondholders plans to divide the company in two.Common law claims, which provide for punitive damages, are proven only by "clear and convincing" evidence.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
For those who like reruns, the state's business interests have a show for you: It's called the 1993 Maryland General Assembly, and it starts a 90-day run today in Annapolis.The featured player is punitive damages reform, an issue that brought some of the largest companies in Maryland out in force last year -- to no avail. The companies tried to pass a bill to limit the exposure of defendants to punitive awards but lost at the hands of plaintiffs' attorneys and consumer groups."I think business is coming together, both large and small, to basically pick up where we left off last year on punitive damages," said Paul Tiburzi, a lobbyist who led a business coalition that fought for the reforms.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's business community came out in '' force yesterday to fight for legislation that it says would make punitive damages more predictable and solve one of the most serious threats to the state's economic competitiveness."
BUSINESS
By David Conn VTC and David Conn VTC,Annapolis Bureau | March 4, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A bill to limit how punitive damages are awarded in Maryland cleared the House of Delegates yesterday but faces a tough battle in the Senate.The House voted 83-43 for House Bill 329, which its supporters say would bring some much-needed element of predictability to the awards.Business groups say the restrictions are needed to help reduce the growing costs of undeserved lawsuits and to make Maryland and U.S. companies competitive with their foreign counterparts.Opponents argued that the bill would remove the incentives for companies to guard against employee wrongdoing.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Maryland's highest court on Tuesday struck down the bulk of a fraud case against ExxonMobil Corp. stemming from an underground gasoline leak in Baltimore County, reversing most of $1.65 billion in judgments and dealing a stunning blow to hundreds of families. In two opinions on cases arising from the 26,000 gallon spill in Jacksonville in 2006, the Court of Appeals tossed out claims of fraud and ruled that plaintiffs could not collect for emotional distress or the cost of medical care to monitor possible symptoms of illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
A third person involved in a car accident at this year's All Good Music Festival has sued the organizers, Maryland-based Walther Productions. The jam band festival, which takes place in July in West Virginia, was accused of negligence in a pair of lawsuits filed earlier this month by two other victims, a young woman who was injured and the father of a young woman who died as a result of the car accident. In an interview last week, an attorney for the organizers defended the festival's safety record.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Baltimore County jurors returned a verdict for punitive damages against ExxonMobil Corp. on Thursday that raises the total award stemming from an underground gasoline leak in 2006 to more than $1.5 billion, a figure that a plaintiffs' lawyer says could make it the largest judgment ever in a case of this type. A review of the final verdict, released in full Friday, shows that it includes more than $1 billion in new awards divided among 160 families and businesses in the small north county community of Jacksonville, plus compensatory damages awarded earlier in the week.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
A Baltimore County jury has ordered Exxon Mobil Corp. to pay more than $495 million to compensate a group of Jacksonville families and businesses for claims of lost property value, emotional distress and medical monitoring resulting from a 2006 underground gasoline leak - and damages could continue to grow. The Circuit Court jury was scheduled to continue working Thursday to decide an amount to award the 160 families and businesses in punitive damages, which could be several times higher.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
ExxonMobil Corp. has lost its bid to avoid paying punitive damages in a case stemming from an underground gasoline leak in northern Baltimore County in 2006, but how much the international company will have to pay remains to be seen as the case continues in Circuit Court on Wednesday. A six-member civil jury retired for the day Tuesday after returning a sealed judgment intended to compensate families and businesses for damages - plaintiffs had claimed lost property values, medical monitoring and emotional stress.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
Lawyers for dozens of Baltimore County families suing Exxon Mobil Corp. closed a six-month trial Friday by arguing for punitive damages in a 2006 underground gasoline leak in Jacksonville, accusing the corporation of playing down the potential harm of the contamination and of committing "fraud. " Lawyer Charles G. Bernstein told the nine-member jury in Baltimore County Circuit Court that "this is fraud, pure and simple. ... Their game was just plain damage control. "James F. Sanders, representing Exxon Mobil, wrapped up his case earlier Friday by arguing that the company acknowledged its responsibility in the spill of about 26,000 gallons of regular unleaded gasoline and continues the work of removing the liquid gasoline and vapor.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | June 2, 1996
IN A CASE involving a BMW damaged in shipping, then repainted and sold as new, the Supreme Court on May 20 gave the political right one of its fondest wishes -- tougher, but still unclear, limits on punitive damages in product-liability cases.Business has complained that the prospect of punitive awards like the $4 million an Alabama court awarded in BMW of North America v. Gore stifled innovation, especially drug research.Consumer activists say punitive awards were never a threat to any but the most flagrant lawbreakers -- notably asbestos companies -- so they insist the case will change little, especially in Maryland, whose law makes it harder to get punitive awards than almost any other state.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
Lawyers for dozens of Baltimore County families suing Exxon Mobil Corp. closed a six-month trial Friday by arguing for punitive damages in a 2006 underground gasoline leak in Jacksonville, accusing the corporation of playing down the potential harm of the contamination and of committing "fraud. " Lawyer Charles G. Bernstein told the nine-member jury in Baltimore County Circuit Court that "this is fraud, pure and simple. … Their game was just plain damage control. " James F. Sanders, representing Exxon Mobil, wrapped up his case earlier Friday by arguing that the company acknowledged its responsibility in the spill of about 26,000 gallons of regular unleaded gasoline and continues the work of removing the liquid gasoline and vapor.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
A Baltimore jury has awarded an aspiring boxer more than $113,000 in damages and medical expenses after a hit-and-run by an unmarked police vehicle in 2009, according to his attorney. Deon Johnson, 19, said he was sitting on a dirt bike at Pennsylvania Avenue and Mosher Street when an unmarked city police car hit him and knocked him to the ground. The civil jury awarded Johnson more than $53,000 for pain and suffering and his medical expenses, as well as $60,000 in punitive damages from Officer Scott Reid, who was driving, and Officers Steven Kolacz and Brandon Barnes, who were passengers.
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