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NEWS
July 7, 2010
I should have been a pundit. Defined, a "pundit" is someone who offers to the mass-media his or her opinion or commentary on a particular subject area on which they are knowledgeable. When I walked out of my last evaluation with an above-average score, I felt secure in my position. Little did I know that "employment at will" means you can be terminated for any reason or no reason. If you are black, Mexican, overweight, underweight, too ugly, too pretty or you blow the whistle, you can be fired on the spot.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Owen Kirby | October 3, 2014
Is America responsible for the chaos engulfing the Middle East? It is a question not far from many a Washington discussion of current events. With the Islamic State's fanatics erasing the region's colonial borders, for some the answer is evident: The U.S. upended the established order when it invaded Iraq in 2003, the repercussions of which are being faced now and likely for years to come. Requiring little perspective, this analysis has been embraced by a number of pundits. As is often the case in the Middle East, the reality is not so simple.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 18, 1996
The tyranny of New Hampshire and Iowa has been exposed as fraudulent. As though any pundit in 2000 will remember.Intimidating Taiwan is such fun the Chinese are going to keep up the fun and war games.For its next president, the Hopkins is examining an MRI wizard who can see through anything.It is announced that the northwest segment of the Beltway will be widened. This means that for two-plus years it will be narrowed.Pub Date: 3/18/96
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
If Republican Larry Hogan wants to be Maryland's next governor, he needs to drive home his message of cutting taxes and creating jobs. And he needs to appear pleasant. For his part, Democrat Anthony G. Brown needs to avoid unforced errors that could squander his advantages. And he can't underestimate his opponent. This is among the advice offered by political pundits and campaign veterans, many of whom expect a lively race for governor when the campaign for the Nov. 4 election moves into higher gear in the coming weeks.
FEATURES
September 22, 2005
American mass media is the topic as this year's annual Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium kicks off at the Johns Hopkins University. The first speaker is political pundit James Carville; his presentation is titled "The State of American Poli tics." The lecture takes place at 8 p.m. in Shriver Hall Auditorium, Homewood campus. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and a reception fol lows. Admission is free. 410-516-7683. FYI Kevin Cowherd is taking time off after surgery. His column will resume when he returns.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 14, 1992
EIGHT YEARS ago this month this column under the above by-line appeared here for the first time. Today it does for the last time.Beginning next week, it will appear on Mondays and Thursdays. This is a return to the column's historic roots.The use of the final section of The Sun's editorials columns for personalized, sometimes idiosyncratic writing began on Monday, April 28, 1958. It was called "Other Comment" briefly, then became "Notes and Comment. (Later "&.")It joined a somewhat similar Thursday column that then appeared on the far side of the cartoon and letters entitled "The Spillway.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | August 3, 1991
The best guide to writing for newspapers comes from the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein:''Was sich ueberhaupt sagen laesst, laesst sich klar sagen; und wovon man nicht reden kann, darueber muss man schweigen.''Which translates:''What can be said at all can be said clearly; and whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.''Tom Lehrer sang: ''Plagiarize, plagiarize, plagiarize.''An eminent dean of journalism recently adopted Tom's advice, figuring that if his speech was dull enough, no one would notice.
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | December 23, 2005
Money talks. It writes, too. If I were just a tad more pretentious, I would call this an article - wait, make that an essay - about the commodification of opinion. It came out last week that a couple of conservative pundits have been on the take from lobbyist extraordinaire Jack Abramoff. He would pay them up to $2,000 for columns and op-ed pieces that advanced the interests of his clients. This is on top of the $3.95 or so these writers collected from the newspapers themselves. How embarrassing: opinions for sale, like cheeseburgers.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | February 26, 1992
The city of Washington is crawling with reporters. After lawyers, bureaucrats and crack dealers, journalism is probably the most common trade in our capital.Many of them are investigative reporters, who know how to dig through musty heaps of governmental records in search of an amazing fact.So I'm surprised that none have bothered to look into one of the most intriguing incidents in the life and times of Pat Buchanan, who has temporarily given up the loud-opinion business to become a presidential candidate.
NEWS
October 30, 2007
Rep. Mike Pence, an Indiana Republican, put it best recently in the Congressional Record when he spoke in favor of a bill he has fought hard to pass: "As a conservative who believes in limited government, I believe the only check on government power in real time is a free and independent press," Mr. Pence said. "The Free Flow of Information Act is not about protecting reporters; it's about protecting the public's right to know." The bill, which would give journalists qualified protection from revealing their sources in federal cases, passed the House, 398-21, and has strong, bipartisan support in the Senate, where both the House bill and a Senate version are under consideration.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Hours after winning their party primaries, Democrat Anthony G. Brown and Republican Larry Hogan exchanged the first salvos in November's race for governor. Hogan released an Internet ad calling the lieutenant governor "the most incompetent man in Maryland" and vowed to make the campaign a referendum on Gov. Martin O'Malley's tenure. Brown shot back that he would make the campaign a referendum on the "failed administration" of Maryland's last Republican governor, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., in whose Cabinet Hogan served.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Chris Hayes, an editor at large of The Nation and host of the talk show bearing his name on MSNBC, was raised in a working-class neighborhood but attended some of the most exclusive schools on the planet. "I grew up in the Bronx," says the affable, 33-year-old anchor of "Up With Chris Hayes. " "My mother was the daughter of an Italian deli owner. But I'm also hugely a product of the meritocracy, and for that reason I have my own affection for it. " Both experiences provided fodder for his much-discussed first book, "Twilight of the Elites: America after Meritocracy.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
The commentators are at it - parsing, postulating and portending with a perception of the vice presidential debate that left me stunned ("VP rivals come out swinging," Oct. 12). Did they hear the same debate I heard? Vice President Biden was called rude and described as having "his fist in [Rep. Paul] Ryan's mouth. " Mitt Romney, on the other hand, was hailed for his performance in the presidential debates, notwithstanding his total disregard for the time limits set by poor, beleaguered moderator Jim Lehrer.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Nothing like piling on when a team's down. Now even The Onion, the satirical publication and website that bills itself as “America's Finest News Source,”  is taking shots at the Orioles. The latest edition skewers the team with a “news brief” and the headline: “ Orioles: We Have Enough Talent To Win 5 More Games This Season .” Despite well over a decade of futility before their hot start this season, the Baltimore Orioles . . . told reporters . . . they trust in one another and believe they have enough talent this year to win five more games.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 31, 2010
To clumsily paraphrase America's great lyricist: "What is this thing called Beck? This funny thing called Beck? Just who can solve his mystery? Why should he make a fool of me?" Those clever words, together with Cole Porter's haunting 1930 tune, keep running through my mind as I contemplate the bizarre rally of commentator/celebrity/preacher Glenn Beck at the Lincoln Memorial the other day. Beyond the argument over how many people flocked around the reflecting pool and beyond for the event — from 87,000, as guesstimated from an aerial photo, to half a million or more by Beck enthusiasts — what was the Saturday rally all about?
NEWS
July 7, 2010
I should have been a pundit. Defined, a "pundit" is someone who offers to the mass-media his or her opinion or commentary on a particular subject area on which they are knowledgeable. When I walked out of my last evaluation with an above-average score, I felt secure in my position. Little did I know that "employment at will" means you can be terminated for any reason or no reason. If you are black, Mexican, overweight, underweight, too ugly, too pretty or you blow the whistle, you can be fired on the spot.
NEWS
By LEE TERRY | August 9, 2006
In a recent news conference, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, said that although she claims to watch Comedy Central's satirical pundit show The Colbert Report "all the time," she "wouldn't recommend that anyone go on the show." Her advice to other members of Congress: "Don't subject yourself to a comic's edit unless you want to be made a fool of." Last month, Rep. Robert Wexler, a Florida Democrat, seemed to prove her point when Stephen Colbert convinced him to make outlandish statements on camera.
NEWS
By DAN RADRICKS | January 9, 1995
The Bethesda-based World Future Society marked the new year with its most thought-provoking forecasts for 1995 and beyond, among them: "Virtual reality experiences may lead to personality afflictions that will send people to psychiatrists. People may forgo their 'real' identities for the perfect bodies created in the world of virtual reality." Life as Super Mario. I can't wait.Arnick on emissionsRegarding Maryland's new auto emissions test -- you know, the one that requires state employees to actually touch a guy's car -- Del. John Arnick says: "I've gotten more messages on this thing than any issue since I've been in political office."
SPORTS
December 9, 2009
Total points with first-place votes in parentheses PLAYER POS. TEAM PTS (1ST) 1. Mark Ingram RB Alabama 46 (4) 2. Toby Gerhart RB Stanford 43 (2) 3. Ndamukong Suh DT Nebraska 36 (4) 3. Colt McCoy QB Texas 36 (1) 5. Kellen Moore QB Boise State 11 (1) 6. Tim Tebow QB Florida 7 6. C.J. Spiller RB Clemson 7 8. Golden Tate WR Notre Dame 5 (1)
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec , jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | December 7, 2009
Bronson Arroyo SP, Reds 2009 stats: 15-13, 3.84 ERA Skinny: Contract is prohibitive, but innings-eater would be a good fit on a young staff. Garrett Atkins 3B, Rockies 2009 stats: .226 avg., 9 HRs, 48 RBIs Skinny: He'll likely be nontendered, meaning O's could wait and sign him as a free agent. Miguel Cabrera 1B, Tigers 2009 stats: .324, 34 HRs, 103 RBIs Skinny: Are the Tigers cash-strapped enough to dangle one of the game's best hitters?
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