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Pumpkin Soup

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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Mary Mossman of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making Polish pumpkin soup with dumplings. She said her grandmother came from Poland and taught her mother Polish cooking, and this soup was a favorite of hers. She was hoping someone would be able to share a recipe for the traditional Polish version of the soup. Jean Suda of Timonium had two grandmothers who came to the U.S. from Poland in the early 1900s, and she has a collection of her mother's and grandmother's recipes, as well as several good Polish cookbooks that she uses regularly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Mary Mossman of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making Polish pumpkin soup with dumplings. She said her grandmother came from Poland and taught her mother Polish cooking, and this soup was a favorite of hers. She was hoping someone would be able to share a recipe for the traditional Polish version of the soup. Jean Suda of Timonium had two grandmothers who came to the U.S. from Poland in the early 1900s, and she has a collection of her mother's and grandmother's recipes, as well as several good Polish cookbooks that she uses regularly.
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NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2005
Marie Auer from Catonsville was hoping to find the recipe for the delicious pumpkin soup that is served at the Au Bon Pan restaurant chain. While we were unable to locate the recipe for the soup served at the restaurant, the recipe sent in by Leo Forsberg from Bordentown, N.J., that I tested made a very tasty soup. Unlike many pumpkin soup recipes, his contains no cream, yet when pureed is beautifully thick and smooth. The addition of the lemon juice and the spices, the coriander in particular, gives the soup a savory, instead of sweet, flavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
The pumpkin has so much more to offer than languishing on a doorstep as a jack-o'-lantern or being dumped unceremoniously into a pie for a cheap thrill at the end of Thanksgiving dinner. The culinary uses for pumpkin are as limitless as your imagination. Fried, braised, steamed, roasted or even shaved ribbon-thin into salads, pumpkin can hold its own with any vegetable, working incredibly well in savory dishes. Even after Halloween, the local farmers' markets will be overrun with these gorgeous gourds.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
The search is over for John Powers of Ellicott City who requested a "recipe for a very distinctive pumpkin soup." He writes that he and his wife enjoyed the soup at the Jekyll Island Club Hotel in Georgia and the "soup tasted almost like pumpkin pie mix with hints of cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and ginger. It didn't have onion or garlic or other strong garden spices like others we have had. We have prepared perhaps a half dozen pumpkin soup recipes, but none of them came close."Chef Gilles Syglowski chose the soup recipe from Judy Miller of Columbia, who calls her soup Venezuelan pumpkin soup and says "it is our favorite."
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1999
It's not exactly politically correct to say so, but Thanksgiving dinner can be a real drag.OK, the food is almost always great: tables filled to overflowing with heaping platters of comfort food, desserts galore and the obligatory pass-out on the couch afterward.But preparing such an enormous feast can be a daunting, back-breaking task for the family's designated holiday chef, who will surely wonder: "Wouldn't it be great if we could just eat out this Thanksgiving?"This year, choices abound for Thanksgiving dinner at local restaurants.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2005
Scott Lane from Des Moines, Iowa, was looking for a recipe for Indian pudding, a dessert he remembers fondly from his college days in New England. There are many variations to Indian pudding, but it always is made using cornmeal and milk and sometimes eggs. Barbara Ruffner from Greensburg, Pa., had a recipe for the classic comfort food that Lane is sure to enjoy. It does not contain eggs but does use maple syrup and raisins, both of which gave the pudding a wonderful flavor and aroma. It's best to serve it warm with vanilla ice cream.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | December 11, 1994
Stone Manor, 5820 Carroll Boyer Road, Middletown; (301) 473-5454. Major credit cards. Open for dinner Tuesdays to Saturdays 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday brunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Prix-fixe menus, $45 and $55. ***As we approached the fieldstone house, the door opened and a woman stood there beckoning us in. Behind her in the foyer two musicians were playing the last strains of "The Tennessee Waltz." It was unexpected, to say the least.We had arrived at Stone Manor that Sunday for the last dinner seating at 6 p.m. The musicians, it turned out, were from that afternoon's "Harvest Tea" and dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
The pumpkin has so much more to offer than languishing on a doorstep as a jack-o'-lantern or being dumped unceremoniously into a pie for a cheap thrill at the end of Thanksgiving dinner. The culinary uses for pumpkin are as limitless as your imagination. Fried, braised, steamed, roasted or even shaved ribbon-thin into salads, pumpkin can hold its own with any vegetable, working incredibly well in savory dishes. Even after Halloween, the local farmers' markets will be overrun with these gorgeous gourds.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | December 19, 1999
This week's menusEach day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/ExpressEveryone...
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2005
Marie Auer from Catonsville was hoping to find the recipe for the delicious pumpkin soup that is served at the Au Bon Pan restaurant chain. While we were unable to locate the recipe for the soup served at the restaurant, the recipe sent in by Leo Forsberg from Bordentown, N.J., that I tested made a very tasty soup. Unlike many pumpkin soup recipes, his contains no cream, yet when pureed is beautifully thick and smooth. The addition of the lemon juice and the spices, the coriander in particular, gives the soup a savory, instead of sweet, flavor.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2005
Scott Lane from Des Moines, Iowa, was looking for a recipe for Indian pudding, a dessert he remembers fondly from his college days in New England. There are many variations to Indian pudding, but it always is made using cornmeal and milk and sometimes eggs. Barbara Ruffner from Greensburg, Pa., had a recipe for the classic comfort food that Lane is sure to enjoy. It does not contain eggs but does use maple syrup and raisins, both of which gave the pudding a wonderful flavor and aroma. It's best to serve it warm with vanilla ice cream.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | December 19, 1999
This week's menusEach day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/ExpressEveryone...
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1999
It's not exactly politically correct to say so, but Thanksgiving dinner can be a real drag.OK, the food is almost always great: tables filled to overflowing with heaping platters of comfort food, desserts galore and the obligatory pass-out on the couch afterward.But preparing such an enormous feast can be a daunting, back-breaking task for the family's designated holiday chef, who will surely wonder: "Wouldn't it be great if we could just eat out this Thanksgiving?"This year, choices abound for Thanksgiving dinner at local restaurants.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
When television lights cast an eerie glow on the darkened campus last month, Goucher College President Judy Jolley Mohraz found herself once again in the midst of controversy.Students were staging a late-night rally to protest anti-gay graffiti that had been scrawled for weeks on doors around the Towson campus. The scene was reminiscent of another heated meeting last year when students denounced a basketball coach's racial comment.As she had in the past, Mohraz moved swiftly, decrying the incidents and urging campus unity.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
The search is over for John Powers of Ellicott City who requested a "recipe for a very distinctive pumpkin soup." He writes that he and his wife enjoyed the soup at the Jekyll Island Club Hotel in Georgia and the "soup tasted almost like pumpkin pie mix with hints of cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and ginger. It didn't have onion or garlic or other strong garden spices like others we have had. We have prepared perhaps a half dozen pumpkin soup recipes, but none of them came close."Chef Gilles Syglowski chose the soup recipe from Judy Miller of Columbia, who calls her soup Venezuelan pumpkin soup and says "it is our favorite."
FEATURES
By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | December 30, 1992
Paolo Lattanzi, Millie Chan, Flower Silliman, Ursula Forem Hidehiko Takada, Mimi Olanoff, Maria Colon Goldman, Jose Prud'homme and Nicole Routhier share something in common.As one might correctly guess from the nature of this column, each is a cook. What is not as easily discernible is the fact that each teaches cooking -- kosher cooking -- at one of the nation's unique cultural institutions, the 92nd Street Young Men's Young Women's Hebrew Association in New York.The aforementioned names are among the Y's instructors in diverse international culinary styles, from Italian, Indian, Moroccan and Japanese to French, Mexican, Cajun and Vietnamese.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
When television lights cast an eerie glow on the darkened campus last month, Goucher College President Judy Jolley Mohraz found herself once again in the midst of controversy.Students were staging a late-night rally to protest anti-gay graffiti that had been scrawled for weeks on doors around the Towson campus. The scene was reminiscent of another heated meeting last year when students denounced a basketball coach's racial comment.As she had in the past, Mohraz moved swiftly, decrying the incidents and urging campus unity.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | December 11, 1994
Stone Manor, 5820 Carroll Boyer Road, Middletown; (301) 473-5454. Major credit cards. Open for dinner Tuesdays to Saturdays 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday brunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Prix-fixe menus, $45 and $55. ***As we approached the fieldstone house, the door opened and a woman stood there beckoning us in. Behind her in the foyer two musicians were playing the last strains of "The Tennessee Waltz." It was unexpected, to say the least.We had arrived at Stone Manor that Sunday for the last dinner seating at 6 p.m. The musicians, it turned out, were from that afternoon's "Harvest Tea" and dance.
FEATURES
By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | December 30, 1992
Paolo Lattanzi, Millie Chan, Flower Silliman, Ursula Forem Hidehiko Takada, Mimi Olanoff, Maria Colon Goldman, Jose Prud'homme and Nicole Routhier share something in common.As one might correctly guess from the nature of this column, each is a cook. What is not as easily discernible is the fact that each teaches cooking -- kosher cooking -- at one of the nation's unique cultural institutions, the 92nd Street Young Men's Young Women's Hebrew Association in New York.The aforementioned names are among the Y's instructors in diverse international culinary styles, from Italian, Indian, Moroccan and Japanese to French, Mexican, Cajun and Vietnamese.
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