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Pumpkin Pie

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By Susan Reimer | November 21, 2009
If you've been dreaming of pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving, wake up and smell the sweet potatoes. Or the pecans. Poor weather during the growing season and twice the normal rain during the harvest has resulted in a shortage of canned pumpkin on grocery store shelves this holiday season, warn the producers of Libby's, one of the best-known names in pumpkin. "Our calculations indicate that we may deplete our inventory of canned Libby's pumpkin as we approach the Thanksgiving holiday," said Paul Bakus, vice president and general manager for Nestle Baking, Libby's parent company.
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NEWS
November 18, 2012
With his recent re-election, President Barack Obama has won the power to pardon more turkeys on Thanksgiving. But so does every one of us by choosing a nonviolent Thanksgiving observance that gives thanks for our good fortune, health, and happiness with a life-affirming, cruelty-free feast of vegetables, fruits, and grains. And here are more terrific reasons: You will stay alert through the entire football game. You are what you eat. Who wants to be a "butterball"? Your vegetarian kid won't have to boycott the family dinner.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | November 14, 2007
Brenda Walker of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for pumpkin pie with orange zest as one of the ingredients. She lost the original recipe from many years ago and has had no luck duplicating it. Gladys Wilt of Lothian sent in a recipe from the Libby's Home-Baked Goodness cookbook for a Sour-Cream-Orange-Pumpkin Pie. While this is probably not the exact recipe that Walker was searching for, it does have orange zest and is definitely worth her...
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | November 23, 2011
I'm not sure why this happened, but here is Jimmy Fallon wearing a Ray Rice jersey while eating pumpkin pie on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.” I suspect a few of you will be doing the exact same thing on Thanksgiving. [ via Ravens.com ]
FEATURES
By Beth Hillson and Beth Hillson,Contributing Writer | November 11, 1992
Bet you didn't know that pumpkin from a can and the pumpkin you carve for Halloween are the same thing. And, did you also know that pumpkin is a vegetable that's part of the squash family? This recipe calls for canned pumpkin, but it could made with fresh. Start with a 2 pound pumpkin and have an adult cut it in half. Scrape out the seeds. Put both halves, cut side down, on a baking sheet. Pierce the shell a few times with a fork and bake at 350 degrees for about an hour or until it's very soft and the shell begins to cave in. Remove from the oven and let the pumpkin cool completely.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
Pumpkin pie is so much a part of Thanksgiving that when a 17th-century town in Connecticut couldn't get the molasses for its pies in time, it postponed the holiday. If you're a traditionalist at all (and when is traditional food more important than Thanksgiving?), you have to end the festive meal with a pumpkin pie.Unfortunately we've all been faced with so many indifferent pumpkin pies, it's hard to work up much enthusiasm for them -- especially after a rich and heavy dinner.Fear of baking has sent many a shopper scurrying to the frozen food section of the supermarket.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1999
Thanksgiving raises some of life's deeper questions.How do you know the bird isn't overcooking? How much should the pie filling be stirred? White or dark meat? Baked or mashed?Don't be stressed. As a group of 5-year-olds is learning, those facing such daunting decisions today are quite lucky. It means they can probably read well enough to cook.Friendship Valley Elementary kindergarten classes in Westminster spent this week preparing a menu for a Thanksgiving feast and cooking. Yesterday, after reading " `Twas the Night Before Thanksgiving," they dressed as pilgrims and Indians and enjoyed their supper at 9 a.m. (They attend morning kindergarten)
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | November 23, 2011
I'm not sure why this happened, but here is Jimmy Fallon wearing a Ray Rice jersey while eating pumpkin pie on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.” I suspect a few of you will be doing the exact same thing on Thanksgiving. [ via Ravens.com ]
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1991
Desserts are a basic part of this holiday season, but who has time to bake? This shortcut makes any store-bought pumpkin pie good enough for company, a church supper or Thanksgiving itself.Shortcut Pie1 store-bought pumpkin pie, prepared according to package direction1 cup pecan pieces1 tablespoon minced crystallized ginger3/4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar4 tablespoons butter meltedPreheat the oven broiler. Mix all the ingredients in a small bowl. Spread evenly over the top of the pie and broil about seven inches from the source of heat for about two minutes, watching carefully until the topping is golden and the sugar is dissolved.
FEATURES
October 9, 2003
Due to technical difficulties, results of the weekly SunSpot.net survey do not appear in the Live! section today. Here are the results: Last week's question: What is your favorite fall food? 8.7 percent: candied apples (4 votes) 21.7 percent: chili (10) 8.7 percent: lasagna (4) 52.2 percent: pumpkin pie (24) 2.2 percent: squash soup (1) 6.5 percent: sweet potatoes (3) 46 total votes See page 5 of Live! to take part in this week's online survey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
We're rounding up some Thanksgiving options that fall in between preparing it yourself and dining out -- you know, like having it catered. Look for that next Tuesday. On Friday night, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. the Whole Foods in Mt. Washington is doing one of those Thanksgiving tasting things where they let you cmoe in and taste free-range turkey, pumpkin pie and a bunch of side dishes. I do love that corn pudding, I want to say, but I own a small bit of stock in the company.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | November 23, 2010
As I write this, Thanksgiving is only hours away, and I still have no idea what I am serving. There will be a turkey, of course. And potatoes and vegetables and stuffing and gravy. But exactly what form these basic elements will take is still under discussion with my daughter, who believes she was cruelly separated at birth from Ina Garten. I call it "Thanksgiving in the time of the Food Network: All bets are off. " These cooking shows — which are to college students what soap operas were to us when we were in school — have produced a generation of confident young cooks who don't think you have to have years of practice under your belt before you prepare your first truffle.
NEWS
By Jennifer Hlad and Jennifer Hlad,Capital News Service | December 21, 2009
On the Monday before Thanksgiving, smiling women dished out generous helpings of turkey, green beans and sweet potatoes inside the East Baltimore Development Inc. Community Resource Center, as little boys circled the crowded room with trays of lemon cake and pumpkin pie. Hundreds of people - some dressed in their Sunday best, others in work clothes - squeezed to fit at the dozens of tables covered with yellow plastic tablecloths. Neighbors greeted each other with hugs. Old friends shouted above the live jazz music to catch up on grandchildren.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Testerman and Emily Testerman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2009
Avoid the stress, the mess, the "I don't know what happened, I followed the recipe!" dilemma and the cleanup, but still get your turkey fix at these Baltimore restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day. Alizee We're curious to find out what the chefs have in store for their buffet, served 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Usual fare is a mix of contemporary Asian and French cuisine, so the possibilities have our heads spinning. If you go: : Alizee is at 4 W. University Parkway. Call 410-235-8200.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Testerman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2009
Avoid the stress, the mess, the "I don't know what happened, I followed the recipe!" dilemma and the cleanup, but still get your turkey fix at these Baltimore restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day. Alizee We're curious to find out what the chefs have in store for their buffet, served 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Usual fare is a mix of contemporary Asian and French cuisine, so the possibilities have our heads spinning. If you go: Alizee is at 4 W. University Parkway. Call 410-235-8200.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | November 21, 2009
If you've been dreaming of pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving, wake up and smell the sweet potatoes. Or the pecans. Poor weather during the growing season and twice the normal rain during the harvest has resulted in a shortage of canned pumpkin on grocery store shelves this holiday season, warn the producers of Libby's, one of the best-known names in pumpkin. "Our calculations indicate that we may deplete our inventory of canned Libby's pumpkin as we approach the Thanksgiving holiday," said Paul Bakus, vice president and general manager for Nestle Baking, Libby's parent company.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | November 21, 2007
Holiday brunch class -- Learn how to make inventive holiday-inspired brunch dishes at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 27 at Donna's of Columbia, 5850 Waterloo Road. $45. There is a 48-hour cancellation policy. Call 410-659-5248, ext. 112. Three courses of carols --The a cappella quartet Joyous Voices will perform holiday carols while a three-course dinner is served from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Nov. 27 at the Elkridge Furnace Inn, 5745 Furnace Ave., Elkridge. $50 (inclusive of service, tax and soft drinks). Reservations are required; call 410-379-9336.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
Jed Weeks follows the rhythms of the beer calendar. The 24-year-old who lives in Mount Vernon knows that as the seasons change, so do the offerings of craft brewers. These days brewers are rolling out their Oktoberfest beers, traditionally Marzen lagers, slightly sweet and nutty. Its annual autumnal release has been the inspiration of Oktoberfest celebrations from Germany, which started reveling in Munich on Saturday, to the Oct. 10 gathering of Maryland brewers at the Timonium Fairgrounds.
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