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NEWS
By William M. Waters | October 29, 1993
YOU don't need to be a farmer to know this is the pumpkin time of year. And while I've always been dutiful about joining my children in the annual selection of just the right specimens to be hacked into jack-o'-lanterns, this year has been different. For some reason I have pumpkins on the brain.One local school has already sponsored a fall dance called the Pumpkin Polka, while community bulletin boards everywhere announce pumpkin festivals. Still in the fields along the road as I drive to work, those ever-larger, gravity-bound gourds refuse to leave my thoughts.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
My pumpkins turned orange in August! How can I make sure they survive until Halloween? Pumpkins are coloring ahead of schedule by about three weeks this year because of the cool summer. When the rind is hard, cut them from the vine, leaving 3 to 4 inches of stem attached to the pumpkin. Avoid nicks or bruises. When they ripen early, it's helpful to wash them with a weak bleach solution (1 tablespoon bleach to 1 pint water) and rinse before storing them inside on a pallet or platform that allows air to circulate around the fruit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The Helmand's kaddo bowrani (baked pumpkin) Makes: 4-6 servings For pumpkin: 1 small pumpkin (baby or spookies work best) 3/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup vegetable oil Cinnamon For yogurt sauce: 1 cup plain yogurt 1 teaspoon fresh-cut diced garlic Dash salt Slice pumpkin and remove seeds. Peel outer skin. Slice 2-inch pieces lengthwise. Place oil in skillet pan and heat to medium heat. Add pumpkin. Cook on medium heat covered for approximately 10 minutes, turning once.
FEATURES
For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
At Myth and Moonshine, the 'shine isn't confined to Mason jars and shot glasses: It also makes it onto the food menu, which puts a sophisticated spin on country cooking. In this great cold-weather dish, butternut squash and pumpkin add sweetness and spice to hearty chili and a scoop of sour cream infused with sweet apple pie moonshine reduction adds a jolt of countrified fun. Pumpkin Chili with Moonshine Sour Cream Serves 8-10 For the chili: 1 medium butternut squash Olive oil 2 1/2 pounds ground beef 1 large onion, medium dice 1 medium carrot, medium dice 1 ¼ cups diced tomato 1 chipotle pepper in adobo sauce, minced 1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 Tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 packed Tablespoon fresh sage, diced 1 Tablespoon dry oregano 1 1/2 Tablespoons white pepper 2 Tablespoons cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon fresh nutmeg, grated (optional)
FEATURES
By Rosemary Knower | October 28, 1990
Waste not, want not. This time of year, a look at the fields heaped with mountains of pumpkins makes most people itch for a carving knife. What calls back childhood so well as the smell of a jack-o'-lantern pumpkin singed by its resident candle, or the spicy rum-and-ginger smells of pumpkin pie?I was grown up before I discovered other uses for pumpkin, and was ashamed at the pulp I'd thrown away during all those years of carving jack-o'-lanterns. Pumpkin provides a rich, versatile puree that can serve as a base for soup or can be beaten into bread batter to make a moist, chewy breakfast.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | October 25, 1994
THIS IS THE time children get excited about the carving of the pumpkin. Nothing like a jack-o-lantern to bring on the thrills and -- chills of Halloween.But for some of the grandparents of such kids, pumpkins harken to a chilling local incident, not Halloween related.It happened in a Carroll County garden on the night of Dec. 2, 1948. By morning of the next day, a lone orange gourd would be the most famous pumpkin in America. It would put the phrase "Pumpkin Papers" into the language.At about 10 o'clock that night, three men came out of the back door of a white farmhouse on Pipe Creek Farm off Bachman Valley Road near Westminster headed for a small pumpkin patch.
FEATURES
By FRED RASMUSSEN | October 31, 1993
Please send old photos of gospel choirs, within the next week, to Way Back When, Sun Magazine, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278. You must include caption information and your daytime phone number. Also, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope if you'd like your photo returned. If your photo is your only copy, please send a good-quality duplicate, not the original.
FEATURES
October 24, 1990
WHEN YOU THINK of pumpkin, you probably think of pumpkin pies. However, pumpkin can be used in everything from soups to breads to cheesecakes.Pumpkin can be boiled, sauteed or steamed; battered and deep-fried; grilled or baked. In addition, it can be pureed for soup, eaten raw, or used as filling.Canned pumpkin can be stored up to two years, if kept in a cool, dry place.Pumpkin CheesecakeGinger-walnut crust (recipe follows)3 8-ounce packages cream cheese softened1/2 cup sugarOne 16-ounce can pumpkin3 eggs1 teaspoon ground cinnamon1/2 teaspoon ground ginger1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg1 teaspoon grated lemon rindWhipped creamWalnut halvesLemon rind twistsMake ginger-walnut crumb crust; set aside.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 30, 1991
The whimsical cartoon work of Charles M. Schulz has always had a deeply philosophic side, which is perhaps best displayed tonight in the seasonal rerun "It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown" at 8:30 p.m. on Channel 11.The story may involve all the Halloween traditions, but the issue is really the difficult challenge of faith, as practiced by both Charlie and his friend, Linus.Do you remember? The former manages to retain his hope for treats, although consistently getting a rock, while the latter sticks to his belief in a myth that is given no credence by others.
FEATURES
By Patricia Jamieson and Patricia Jamieson,Eating Well Magazine | December 11, 1991
LOTS OF TRADITIONAL holiday foods are high in fats, calories and sugar. Pumpkin-wheat bread, for example, was essential to one family's Christmas dinner. The family still wanted to include this rich, moist loaf in its celebrations but wanted to keep their healthy eating resolutions as well.Fortunately, the recipe could be updated for the nineties. For example, the recipe was pared down by cutting the number of eggs from four to two. Two egg whites were added to compensate.Slimmed Pumpkin-wheat bread 2 1/2 cups all-purpose white flour2 cups whole wheat flour1 tablespoon baking powder2 teaspoons baking soda2 teaspoons salt2 large eggs plus 2 whites2 cups packed brown sugar3 cups unsweetened pumpkin puree1/2 cup vegetable oilPreheat oven to 350 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Mary Mossman of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making Polish pumpkin soup with dumplings. She said her grandmother came from Poland and taught her mother Polish cooking, and this soup was a favorite of hers. She was hoping someone would be able to share a recipe for the traditional Polish version of the soup. Jean Suda of Timonium had two grandmothers who came to the U.S. from Poland in the early 1900s, and she has a collection of her mother's and grandmother's recipes, as well as several good Polish cookbooks that she uses regularly.
NEWS
October 24, 2013
Aberdeen Sigrid Eike Vigus, 74, of the first block of East Aztec Street, was charged Saturday with driving while under the influence of alcohol, driving while impaired by alcohol and negligent driving. Natrice Jowana Parker, 29, of the first block of Liberty Street, was charged Monday with disorderly conduct. Jimmie Delano Mack Jr., 38, who is homeless, was charged Saturday with failing to register as an offender. Jermaine J. Wilson, 33, of the 600 block of Holly Circle, was charged Sunday with trespassing.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2013
Nothing says Halloween like a pumpkin, and dozens of Maryland farmers are grateful for that. The orange harbingers of fall bring crowds to farm stands and pick-your-own fields. They're the centerpiece around which some farms have built themselves into "agritourism" destinations, with hayrides, corn mazes and other kid-friendly activities. Now the crush is on. And in much of the state - fortunately for farmers - the pumpkin harvest is good this year. "The dry weather we had in August and September were great for the pumpkins," said Brad Milton, a farmer who owns Brad's Produce in Harford County with wife Karin.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The Helmand's kaddo bowrani (baked pumpkin) Makes: 4-6 servings For pumpkin: 1 small pumpkin (baby or spookies work best) 3/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup vegetable oil Cinnamon For yogurt sauce: 1 cup plain yogurt 1 teaspoon fresh-cut diced garlic Dash salt Slice pumpkin and remove seeds. Peel outer skin. Slice 2-inch pieces lengthwise. Place oil in skillet pan and heat to medium heat. Add pumpkin. Cook on medium heat covered for approximately 10 minutes, turning once.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
The pumpkin has so much more to offer than languishing on a doorstep as a jack-o'-lantern or being dumped unceremoniously into a pie for a cheap thrill at the end of Thanksgiving dinner. The culinary uses for pumpkin are as limitless as your imagination. Fried, braised, steamed, roasted or even shaved ribbon-thin into salads, pumpkin can hold its own with any vegetable, working incredibly well in savory dishes. Even after Halloween, the local farmers' markets will be overrun with these gorgeous gourds.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
Who's doing what for fall? We're taking a look at new fall menus around town. First up - Crush in Belvedere Square. Joining fall-ready house favorites like BLTs and the shrimp and grits, new entrees on executive chef and owner Daniel Chaustit's fall menu from Crush include seafood flatbread and salmon with butternut squash risotto.  A revamped dessert menu features a pecan tart, apple bread pudding and a pumpkin cheesecake. Also new for fall, Crush's lounge will open at 11:30 a.m. on Sundays for light fare and bar specials.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | October 27, 1990
The two huge castor bean plants on the front lawn catch your eye first. Then you notice that sprawling along the fence by the alley, hyacinth runner bean vines (Dolichos lablab) dangle purple blossoms and matching lima bean-shaped pods. Since these are plants you don't find every day, you assume the caretaker is no run-of-the-mill gardener.Catching him on the lawn of his Baltimore corner row house one day, you learn that his name is Gene Schwartz. He's a Veterans Administration Hospital social worker in a program aiding servicemen who were prisoners of war. When he shows you the pumpkin in his back yard, you know for certain that his interests are novel plants.
NEWS
By Meg Tully, For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
It was the first time Kai D'Angelo had ever picked a pumpkin, and the 4-year-old knew just what he was looking for. As he ran to hop onto a cow train ride at Clark's Elioak Farm in Ellicott City this week, he said his pumpkin would be a small one, and orange. Kai and his father planned to carve the pumpkin into a jack-o'-lantern for the front porch of their Columbia house. His mother said she was happy they had something fun to do together as they roamed over the farm. "He is fascinated with tractors and farms and farm equipment," said Jennifer D'Angelo.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Wedding days: October 13, 2012 and October 27, 2012 His story: Jahantab Sidiqui, 26, grew up in Pakistan and moved to Howard County when he was 14. He is the owner of J.S. Strategies - which is currently managing the campaign for Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger - and lives in Baltimore. His father, Dr. Akhtar Sidiqui is a retired general practitioner and senior vice president at SSSI Corporation. His mother, Parveen Nayab, is a manager at Bank of America. Her story: LaRee McCuan, 29, grew up in Howard County.
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