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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
An electrical failure Thursday morning at a pumping station on South North Point Road in eastern Baltimore County was repaired by 3:30 p.m., restoring water to about 8,000 city and county residents. The area that was affected extends north to East Baltimore Street in the city, east to Merritt Boulevard, south to Delvale Avenue and west to Interstate 95 in the county. mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Eight hundred thousand gallons of raw sewage poured into Gunpowder Falls Sunday night after a pumping station in the Perry Hall area unexpectedly lost power, Baltimore County reported Monday. A Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. crew doing planned maintenance work inadvertently cut power to the sewage pumping station at the end of Dundawan Road about 11:40 p.m., according to David Fidler, spokesman for the county's Department of Public Works. Sewage overflowed from the station into the river nearby for a little more than two hours until BGE crews restored power, Fidler said in an email.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Power was restored to a city pumping station Saturday afternoon, after a morning outage had public works officials calling for water conservation throughout much of Baltimore County's central corridor. Repairs were completed with no disruption to service, officials said. The outage was discovered at the station in the 400 block of Hillen Road at about 6 a.m. and could have affected the water supply for as many as 150,000 customers from Towson north to Sparks. BGE crews reported that the pumping station was again operational as of 12:36 p.m. Any drop in water pressure would have started in the far northern service area before working its way toward Towson, Baltimore Public Works spokesman Kurt Kocher said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan
The Baltimore Sun
| June 9, 2013
It's mostly weeds that grow in the old industrial lots in East Baltimore, but developers have a plan to turn a collection of tumbling-down buildings at a former water pumping station into a place to produce something a bit more nutritious. Gregory Heller, a senior adviser with Econsult Solutions and the project's manager, described the vision for a "Baltimore food hub" Saturday to a small tour group clustered on the pavement in front of the former Eastern Pumping Station at Gay and Wolfe streets.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Eight hundred thousand gallons of raw sewage poured into Gunpowder Falls Sunday night after a pumping station in the Perry Hall area unexpectedly lost power, Baltimore County reported Monday. A Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. crew doing planned maintenance work inadvertently cut power to the sewage pumping station at the end of Dundawan Road about 11:40 p.m., according to David Fidler, spokesman for the county's Department of Public Works. Sewage overflowed from the station into the river nearby for a little more than two hours until BGE crews restored power, Fidler said in an email.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2001
Few things leave a person more unsatisfied in the morning than a showerhead that emits a mere trickle of water. These frustrating mechanisms have become the center of a controversy at New Windsor's Blue Ridge Manor development. Residents of about a dozen homes built on high ground say they have insufficient water pressure, a problem town officials say they foresaw years ago. The homes aren't far enough below the town water tower for gravity to create the requisite pressure. The developer, William Schneider, acknowledges the problem but says the town won't accept his proposed solutions.
NEWS
By Scott Waldman and Scott Waldman,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
Reacting to community protests, city officials are considering extending the deadline for selecting a site for a proposed wastewater pumping station in Wyman Park. During a sometimes heated meeting at City Hall that lasted more than two hours yesterday, community groups asked for an extension of the Aug. 31 site selection deadline. City officials said they would consider the request. The city wants to build the pumping station on one of seven sites under consideration along Stony Run. The 10,000- square-foot pumping station would help cut the amount of wastewater that flows into the Jones Falls during storms, city officials say. In planning for the pumping station, the city has tried to accommodate the wishes of residents affected by the change as much as possible, said Robert H. Murrow, a Department of Public Works spokesman.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
A warning against water contact in the lower Patapsco River issued nearly two months ago has been lifted, the Anne Arundel County health department announced Monday. Health officials had ordered an emergency closure of the river downstream from Annapolis Road in Brooklyn and warned against swimming or other water contact after sewage spilled March 25 from a Baltimore County pumping station. Workers halted the spill soon afterward, according to a spokesman for the county public works department.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2001
Residents in the Severna Park neighborhood of Ben Oaks have succeeded in pressuring the county to change plans for a project that would pump millions of gallons of raw sewage through a tiny sewer pumping station just a stone's throw from the Severn River. But residents remain wary as they wait for the county Department of Public Works to provide details of the alternative plan that would bypass the Ben Oaks station altogether. Engineers said they intend to meet with the community to discuss the plan by the end of the month.
NEWS
By Ilene Hollin and Ilene Hollin,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
The city has set an end-of-the-month deadline for selecting the site of a sewage pumping station along Stony Run in North Baltimore - a timetable that could escalate a months-long dispute in the Wyman Park area. Gary Wyatt, chief utility engineer at the Department of Public Works, said the city has to choose among five proposed sites in the next five weeks so the project, part of a network of federally mandated improvements, can be designed and put up for bid by the end of next year. But community leaders, who are opposed to putting a pumping station at any of the five sites, say there is no need to rush to judgment.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Harford County reported three storm-related sewage spills last week during power outages at pumping stations at the height of Sandy, a hurricane turned tropical storm. The largest spill, nearly 2 million gallons, occurred at the Bush Creek station for about two hours starting at 8:15 p.m. on Oct. 29. The station experienced a total lack of power when its back-up generator, which had been operating for several hours after utility power was lost, failed due to a mechanical problem.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
A warning against water contact in the lower Patapsco River issued nearly two months ago has been lifted, the Anne Arundel County health department announced Monday. Health officials had ordered an emergency closure of the river downstream from Annapolis Road in Brooklyn and warned against swimming or other water contact after sewage spilled March 25 from a Baltimore County pumping station. Workers halted the spill soon afterward, according to a spokesman for the county public works department.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
An electrical failure Thursday morning at a pumping station on South North Point Road in eastern Baltimore County was repaired by 3:30 p.m., restoring water to about 8,000 city and county residents. The area that was affected extends north to East Baltimore Street in the city, east to Merritt Boulevard, south to Delvale Avenue and west to Interstate 95 in the county. mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Power was restored to a city pumping station Saturday afternoon, after a morning outage had public works officials calling for water conservation throughout much of Baltimore County's central corridor. Repairs were completed with no disruption to service, officials said. The outage was discovered at the station in the 400 block of Hillen Road at about 6 a.m. and could have affected the water supply for as many as 150,000 customers from Towson north to Sparks. BGE crews reported that the pumping station was again operational as of 12:36 p.m. Any drop in water pressure would have started in the far northern service area before working its way toward Towson, Baltimore Public Works spokesman Kurt Kocher said.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
Baltimore County utility crews dealt with yet another sewage spill at the Patapsco Sewage Pumping Station in Baltimore Highlands. About 525,000 gallons of sewage spilled from a 54-inch concrete pipe Saturday into the lower Patapsco River. The county spent $500,000 to replace aging pipes earlier this month after a main conduit ruptured in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene and poured about 100 million gallons of raw sewage into the river over the course of a week. Crews discovered a joint failure in the new piping last week and the overflow occurred during the ensuing repair for a few hours early Saturday morning.
EXPLORE
By Staff reports | August 30, 2011
Baltimore County officials said on Monday that power outages from Hurricane Irene's winds this past weekend caused 12 sewage pump stations located across the county to overflow at various times, and for varying periods on Sunday. The overflow was estimated at 16.5 million gallons. The county's Department of Public Works said that on the north side of the county, Forge Acres, Buchanan Road and Texas pump stations overflowed. On the west side, the Patapsco, Frederick Road, Valley Village and Carroll Avenue stations overflowed.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2003
New Windsor is set to borrow about $1.5 million from the state to pay for improvements to the municipality's water system. The first phase of the long-planned upgrades included drilling a well on the town-owned Dennings farm, the fourth well for the town of about 1,100. New Windsor, once the smallest of Carroll's eight towns, has seen much development in the past decade, adding about 400 people to its population. The new well and pumping station will be connected to the town system as soon as possible and pumping before summer, officials said.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2002
Rick Harvey was in his Forest Hill home in Harford County packing for vacation when the Baltimore County public works dispatcher called him about 2:15 p.m. April 28. An alarm had gone off at the Gunpowder sewage pumping station at the end of Dundawan Road in Perry Hall, the dispatcher said. "It was like a punch in the gut," Harvey said. "It knocks the wind out of you." When he arrived at the station about 3:30 p.m., Harvey, the county superintendent of utilities, found sewage burying the pumps and controls at the red brick station.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
Tens of thousands of homes and businesses along the Reisterstown Road and Liberty Road corridors could be without water service as a result of wind-related power outages Saturday at pumping stations. Spokesman Kurt Kocher said the city public works department is asking residents of north Baltimore and north and northwest Baltimore County to conserve water use until the Pikesville pumping station is back in operation. He said the areas where conservation is needed include Pikesville, Randallstown, Reisterstown, Owings Mills, Mays Chapel, Glyndon and points in between.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Erica L. Green | April 8, 2010
Utility crews struggled to restore water service to tens of thousands of Baltimore County residents and businesses Wednesday night, even as officials warned that outages were expected to last through the night. Crews will "hopefully get everyone restored overnight," said Kurt L. Kocher, spokesman for the Baltimore Department of Public Works, which owns and maintains the water system for the city and county. The problem, triggered by an electrical fire near a Towson pumping station, worsened during the day, as water tanks such as the one in Mays Chapel were depleted.
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