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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | December 30, 1993
Three of the county's volunteer fire companies have bought new pumpers in recent weeks, spending nearly $800,000 altogether."You have to do a lot of bingo and fund-raising and raffles, the whole routine," said Thomas Nevin, head of the Anne Arundel County Volunteer Firefighters Association and chief of the Glen Burnie company.The companies, Odenton, Earleigh Heights and Arnold, accumulated small sums at weekly game nights, annual community dinners and form donations.On a spectacular night, a bingo game will bring in $600, said Wylie L. Donaldson, vice president of the Odenton volunteer company.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 11, 2010
The bright-red 2010 Rosenbauer Pumper was so new that it didn't even have fire hoses attached. Delivered just last week, the $600,000 fire engine sat in a bay at Station 6 in Dundalk, waiting to be accessorized. It never got a chance to respond to a fire. Instead, the Rosenbauer and other vehicles - including a National Guard Humvee and two ambulances - were damaged, possibly beyond repair, when the firehouse on Sollers Point Road burned and the roof collapsed early Wednesday.
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NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | September 23, 1993
Carroll County has about 160 "dry hydrants" in Carroll County that should be inspected regularly, but the county has no equipment to conduct the inspections, according to the county's fire protection engineer.Scott Campbell told the county commissioners at a meeting this week that the county would need a large pumper fire engine to properly test the hydrants and storage tanks, but does not own one.Equipment to complete flow tests and to back-flush the tanks could not be carried on a pickup truck, he said.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | July 30, 2007
Of all the things he has seen in his young life, Ryan Messoria is certain of his favorite. "Firetrucks!" the 5-year-old proclaimed yesterday as he wandered among the antique fire-fighting apparatus and top-of-the-line engines on display at the Firehouse Expo at the Baltimore Convention Center. It was the Glen Burnie boy's second visit in three days to the annual gathering, which draws about 16,000 firefighters and rescue workers from up and down the East Coast for training, networking and a trade show.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
The Susquehanna Hose Company was formed on Jan. 24, 1902, and incorporated in 1922. The company, consisting of 33 charter members, served Havre de Grace and the surrounding county. Initially, it was equipped with hand-drawn apparatus. Motorized trucks were purchased after 1910, including a 1934 Stutz pumper, a 1939 American-LaFrance truck designed to carry long ladders and a 1951 Mack pumper. In 1953, the company was made up of three divisions, on North Adams Street, Union Avenue, and at Market and Fountain Streets.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF Editorial assistant Holton F. Brown contributed to this article | June 24, 1998
Stephen G. Heaver, a builder and developer whose fascination with fire trucks and apparatus led him to create the Fire Museum of Maryland, died Monday of lung failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 80.Mr. Heaver loved fire trucks all his life. As a boy, he would sit on the curb near his Roland Park home -- around the corner from a fire station -- to watch them rumble past.He bought his first piece of fire equipment in 1962 and founded the Lutherville museum in 1971.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
Customized transportation may be every driver's dream, but Baltimore County can't afford it for firefighters and paramedics anymore.So the county will stick with the standard models of firetrucks and ambulances to save more than $1.3 million as it embarks on the largest single purchase of fire equipment in county history."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
Frank Sullivan has been selling hot dogs from behind his firetruck at Baltimore Washington International airport for only a month, but already he's calling the candy-apple red pumper "a landmark."He may be using the term loosely, but the 1939 Dodge truck, parked in the airport's observation area off Dorsey Road, certainly attracts attention.Last month, a pilot flying into BWI caught sight of the fire engine, rented a car and drove around for 30 minutes before he found Fireman Frank's umbrella covered cart and satisfied his hunger.
NEWS
September 20, 1992
Savage firefighters continue to serveFrom: Alan GrimesSavageTo our neighbors and friends:Since 1937, professionally trained volunteers from our Fire Department have responded around the clock, seven days a week, whenever you needed us.Your support has enabled the department to grow from one used pumper 55 years ago to two engines, an enhanced pumper and aerial unit, an ambulance, brush truck and nearly 100 men and women.As you may know, the Savage Fire Department has been the focus of some negative publicity in recent days.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | December 13, 1994
The sirens sounded, the red warning lights flashed and nearly all the equipment exited Sykesville Freedom District Fire Company Friday night.This was a fun run, not a race to an emergency call.The firefighters made their way leisurely down Freedom Avenue and into Piney Run Village, first stop on the 1994 Santa Detail.Volunteers take the two weekends before Christmas to make the annual good will tour through all South Carroll neighborhoods."We hit every street in every development, even though sometimes we have to double back," said Lt. Steve Anske.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
The Susquehanna Hose Company was formed on Jan. 24, 1902, and incorporated in 1922. The company, consisting of 33 charter members, served Havre de Grace and the surrounding county. Initially, it was equipped with hand-drawn apparatus. Motorized trucks were purchased after 1910, including a 1934 Stutz pumper, a 1939 American-LaFrance truck designed to carry long ladders and a 1951 Mack pumper. In 1953, the company was made up of three divisions, on North Adams Street, Union Avenue, and at Market and Fountain Streets.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2000
What occurred yesterday morning in Ocean City as their annual state convention got under way might prompt volunteer firefighters to add a new workshop next year: "What to do when someone takes your $360,000 fire engine."The latest tale of summer weirdness at the shore began just before dawn yesterday. An ambulance crew returning from an emergency in Berlin was crossing the U.S. 50 bridge into Ocean City when it spotted a fire engine that shares its station house headed in the opposite direction.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
Arthur "Smokestack" Hardy began a lifetime of chasing fire engines when he was a boy and the grand old horse-drawn pumpers belched fire and smoke from their nickel-plated boilers."
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF Editorial assistant Holton F. Brown contributed to this article | June 24, 1998
Stephen G. Heaver, a builder and developer whose fascination with fire trucks and apparatus led him to create the Fire Museum of Maryland, died Monday of lung failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 80.Mr. Heaver loved fire trucks all his life. As a boy, he would sit on the curb near his Roland Park home -- around the corner from a fire station -- to watch them rumble past.He bought his first piece of fire equipment in 1962 and founded the Lutherville museum in 1971.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 1997
The Ellicott City Lions Club is joining Baltimore's Cross Street Irregulars in sponsoring a Micro Fest, offering all comers a taste of 16 different beers from eight microbreweries.Home-brewing has been a popular hobby in recent years, a hands-on pastime with a clear reward.Some home brewers enjoyetheir hobby enough to start small businesses, and microbreweries have sprouted around the state. Some microbreweries have a charitable streak -- they're donating two kegs for the Lions event.Proceeds from the Micro Fest will benefit Camp Merrick for visually impaired children, and the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1997
The little red manual pumper -- carefully restored after decades of storage in a garage -- looks like a child's wagon beside the massive aerial ladder truck in the Pikesville Volunteer Fire Company station on Sudbrook Lane.The contrast shows how far the company has come in its first 100 years, from the days when Pikesville was a country village distant from Baltimore to its current status as the city's highly urbanized, cheek-by-jowl neighbor.Organized on Feb. 4, 1897, at the local Odd Fellows Hall, the Pikesville company is the second oldest in Baltimore County after Cockeysville and is among the county's busiest, with a roster of 120 men and women who last year answered nearly 4,200 calls.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1997
The little red manual pumper -- carefully restored after decades of storage in a garage -- looks like a child's wagon beside the massive aerial ladder truck in the Pikesville Volunteer Fire Company station on Sudbrook Lane.The contrast shows how far the company has come in its first 100 years, from the days when Pikesville was a country village distant from Baltimore to its current status as the city's highly urbanized, cheek-by-jowl neighbor.Organized on Feb. 4, 1897, at the local Odd Fellows Hall, the Pikesville company is the second oldest in Baltimore County after Cockeysville and is among the county's busiest, with a roster of 120 men and women who last year answered nearly 4,200 calls.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
Arthur "Smokestack" Hardy began a lifetime of chasing fire engines when he was a boy and the grand old horse-drawn pumpers belched fire and smoke from their nickel-plated boilers."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
Frank Sullivan has been selling hot dogs from behind his firetruck at Baltimore Washington International airport for only a month, but already he's calling the candy-apple red pumper "a landmark."He may be using the term loosely, but the 1939 Dodge truck, parked in the airport's observation area off Dorsey Road, certainly attracts attention.Last month, a pilot flying into BWI caught sight of the fire engine, rented a car and drove around for 30 minutes before he found Fireman Frank's umbrella covered cart and satisfied his hunger.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | December 13, 1994
The sirens sounded, the red warning lights flashed and nearly all the equipment exited Sykesville Freedom District Fire Company Friday night.This was a fun run, not a race to an emergency call.The firefighters made their way leisurely down Freedom Avenue and into Piney Run Village, first stop on the 1994 Santa Detail.Volunteers take the two weekends before Christmas to make the annual good will tour through all South Carroll neighborhoods."We hit every street in every development, even though sometimes we have to double back," said Lt. Steve Anske.
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