Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPulp Fiction
IN THE NEWS

Pulp Fiction

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 14, 1994
Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction" is a Saturday Night Fever dream: a hot, dense, wicked disco of tough-guy posturings, vivid dips of violence and literally unbelievable plot moves.Set on a single deconstructed weekend in a hyperbolically exaggerated Los Angeles criminal netherworld, it blithely slides through three main, marginally interconnected narratives, throwing away dazzling chunks of screwball dialogue, doing effortless deadpan comic riffs with the ease of a con man, while re-arranging time sequences for better thump.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 16, 2014
I used to get blamed all the time for stuff Bob Steinback said. To be fair, it wasn't always blame -- sometimes it was credit -- and it went both ways. Sometimes, he had to explain to people that it was not he who had written a certain thing, but me. Robert L. Steinback was, as I was and still am, a columnist for The Miami Herald, and and we shared a certain superficial physical similarity, both of us bearded, bald and black. That said, we really didn't look a lot alike. For one thing, I wear glasses and Bob doesn't.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
A slimmed-down Edna Turnblad shared the stage with her creator, John Waters, last night, much to the delight of scores of star-crazed fans. Well, it wasn't exactly Edna, the zaftig stage mom from Waters' "Hairspray," who took to the stage at the Maryland Institute College of Art . Rather, it was actor John Travolta, who brought Edna to the big screen in the 2007 musical version of Waters' film, up there on the stage. But the crowd embraced him like one of their own. "You've always been my favorite actor," one fan said from the audience, noting that she spent her teen years with pictures of Travolta plastered to her wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
A slimmed-down Edna Turnblad shared the stage with her creator, John Waters, last night, much to the delight of scores of star-crazed fans. Well, it wasn't exactly Edna, the zaftig stage mom from Waters' "Hairspray," who took to the stage at the Maryland Institute College of Art . Rather, it was actor John Travolta, who brought Edna to the big screen in the 2007 musical version of Waters' film, up there on the stage. But the crowd embraced him like one of their own. "You've always been my favorite actor," one fan said from the audience, noting that she spent her teen years with pictures of Travolta plastered to her wall.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1995
"Pulp Fiction," the exuberant, innovatively structured crime drama directed by Quentin Tarantino, was named the best film of 1994 by the National Society of Film Critics yesterday. Voting at the Algonquin Hotel in New York, the 42-member group also cited Mr. Tarantino as best director and gave its best-screenplay prize to him and Roger Avary as the film's co-writers.Jennifer Jason Leigh was voted best actress for her performance as the caustic, brittle heroine of "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 22, 1995
It may not be the best thing on TV tonight, but it's certainly the strangest: Quentin Tarantino appears as a video supplier on "All-American Girl," an episode devoted to spoofing the writer-director's film "Pulp Fiction."* "Rescue 911" (8 p.m.-8:25 p.m., Channel 13) -- So that CBS can squeeze all of "The Hunt for Red October" into prime time, this is an abbreviated version of "Rescue 911," only 41 percent as long as usual. That being the case, perhaps tonight's show should have been titled "Rescue 373.51."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 8, 2002
Pulp Fiction may have been the film that made an uber-hotshot of Quentin Tarantino, but it was his first film, Reservoir Dogs -- the hit of the 1992 Sundance Film Festival -- that announced him as a major talent. Watching the earlier film again, especially as it's so lovingly presented in the extras-laden 10th anniversary DVD edition released last month by Artisan, I'm loathe to say which is the appreciably better film. Certainly, all the things that everyone would rave about in Pulp Fiction are there in Dogs: the incredible energy; the homages to other directors and movies, the incessant cultural references; the jumping back and forth in time; the sure-footed, cutting-edge direction that somehow manages to never draw attention to itself, but rather seems perfectly suited to the scene or the characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 25, 1994
The pattern is familiar, ancient, always dispiriting: A director with a vivid voice and a new way of seeing things breaks through, big time. Then they send in the clones.In this case, the director is Quentin Tarantino, of "Reservoir Dogs" and "Pulp Fiction," and the clone is Roger Roberts Avary, a buddy of his who co-wrote the first two and on the strength of Tarantino's recommendation has been allowed to make "Killing Zoe," with Tarantino as executive producer. The two met in that now famous font of movie culture, a Manhattan Beach, Calif.
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | December 24, 1995
For its January issue, Vanity Fair bows to coolness and the "PF" crowd by putting smoking "Pulp Fiction" star Uma Thurman and her "disturbing beauty" on the cover. So what if the 25-year-old actress has remarkably little to say? Her comeback gig with John Travolta and last year's Oscar nomination poem by Dave Letterman ("Uma, Oprah, Oprah, Uma") have supplied her with enough cover cred for at least another year.Uma's the Queen of Quentinville, and Quentin Tarantino does still rule. Just ask Mr. Travolta, who pronounces in an interview in the year-end issue of Rolling Stone, "If there's a new feeling in Hollywood, it's because Quentin was the first person in a while to feel like we could treat an audience with intelligence.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 7, 1997
The power of the movie star continues to drive films, even if you've never heard of the star or seen any of his movies.That's certainly the case in "Hard Eight" although the star isn't, as you've been informed, either Gwyneth Paltrow, this year's IT girl, or Samuel Jackson, last year's IT guy. Rather it's an obscurity named Phillip Baker Hall, who's an actor, not an IT: he once played Richard Nixon in a filmed one-man play. He dominates this film with the vivid charisma of a Komodo dragon in an ascot.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | December 9, 2008
Pulp Fiction 7 p.m. [AMC] You know why it's included: Bruce Willis (right) plays a fighter, and there's a boxing scene. Oh, and Harvey Keitel sort of drives like he's in NASCAR. However, I think AMC scheduled this for a little early in the evening.
FEATURES
March 9, 2007
THE QUESTION Samuel L. Jackson's new movie, Black Snake Moan, hit theaters last Friday. What is your favorite Jackson movie, and why? WHAT YOU SAY No question about it, Pulp Fiction is my absolute favorite Samuel Jackson movie! Richard Crystal, Lutherville What is my favorite Samuel L. Jackson movie? Pulp Fiction. Why? Because his role as the philosophical hitman, Jules Winnfield, is a great one, and Pulp Fiction is most arguably the only great film in which he has ever appeared. Peter Muncie, Columbia THE NEXT QUESTION Now that Hollywood's awards season is over, what nominated movies will you buy on DVD, and why?
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Three months after the hype and headlines, I have finally read Game of Shadows, the book by two San Francisco Chronicle investigative reporters who broke open the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO) steroid scandal. Before turning the first page, several fellow baseball writers had already shared their feelings about the book. One said it read like a 250-page newspaper article. Another said there was too much track and field and not enough focus on San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds, whose back adorns the front cover.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- Filmmaker Quentin Tarantino, the 41-year old maestro of Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction and now Kill Bill Vol. 2, is perched in the family room of his Mulholland mansion, popping strange Japanese cheese munchies into his mouth and trying to explain that Kill Bill, which seemed like a chick revenge movie in Vol. 1, actually turns out to be a love story in Vol. 2. A twisted, cracked love story, to be sure, but "a legitimate love story, all right,"...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 11, 2003
Filming that stretched over 155 days. Needing to become proficient at a whole host of martial arts. Keeping up with the whirling dervish that is Quentin Tarantino. Learning to drive a stick. Uma Thurman tries to make it sound like no big deal, but surely the filming of Kill Bill was no picnic for her - not when filming took twice as long as originally planned, the swordfighting techniques she had to master involved muscles she didn't even realize she had, and enough fake blood flowed during the shoot to fill a big-city reservoir.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 11, 2003
Six years have passed since Quentin Tarantino's last film, and not since Terrence Malick took a 20-year hiatus between Days of Heaven (1978) and The Thin Red Line (1998) has a director's return to the screen been more widely anticipated. Chat rooms have dedicated themselves to the topic. Speculation has known no bounds - was he suffering from chronic writer's block? Was he drying out someplace? Was he too demanding? Too sensitive to criticism? Just too plain weird for Hollywood? Kill Bill - Vol. 1 ends the drought, and its quality (as well as its assortment of patented Tarantino touches)
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 19, 1996
MOSCOW -- Five years after Soviet censorship ended, Russian cities have well-stocked bookstores that are constantly mobbed. Street-corner book vendors do a brisk business from portable card tables, even in remotest Siberia.But the Russian reading renaissance isn't what would be expected in a nation where everyone from the president to the elevator operator can quote from memory Dostoevski, Tolstoy and Pushkin.Instead, millions of Russian are buying "Russky Trillers," a new pulp fiction genre vying with with bodice-rippers by Western romance writers.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1997
It's a pleasure to report that "Jackie Brown" is unevenly paced, lethargic and sometimes even boring. Because even though it is mediocre as a movie, as an example of a filmmaker in transition, it is a triumph.With his eagerly anticipated follow-up to "Pulp Fiction" -- that 1994 masterpiece of scattershot editing, addiction to pop culture and Ritalin-deprived dialogue -- Quentin Tarantino seems to be slowing himself down, choosing to focus on characters as complex bundles of motivations rather than vectors for grand gestures and punchy aphorisms.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 3, 2003
This would be a good weekend to camp out at the Senator. Tonight, Rita Moreno will be in town for a screening of West Side Story. The 1961 musical garnered 10 Oscars (third most of all time, behind Ben-Hur and Titanic, which earned 11), including one for Moreno as Best Supporting Actress. Tickets for the film are $40, with proceeds going to GEDCO, an organization that provides affordable housing and support services to area residents in need. As of yesterday afternoon, only 83 tickets were left for the 7 p.m. event, which includes a reception, sidewalk-block unveiling and Q&A with Moreno.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 29, 2003
John Travolta remembers his own personal Liberation Day. It came not long after he'd starred in Pulp Fiction, director Quentin Tarantino's whip-smart, ultra-violent ode to American popular fiction. The 1994 film earned kudos from every corner of the globe, instantly made Tarantino the most influential filmmaker of his day and rescued Travolta's career from the kind of doldrums that usually end with the star headlining a soon-to-be-canceled television series. It also marked a shift in Travolta's style of acting, giving him an excuse to move from one emotional range to the other.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.