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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
For the first time in the six years since Victoria Chakwin was diagnosed with a deadly lung disease, the gown she wears won't be hospital issue. The 18-year-old from Martinsburg, W.Va., will go to her senior prom Saturday night in a red-and-black number she found on the Internet. A rite of passage for most teens, the event is more momentous for Victoria - who's known as Tori - because people diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis generally live only three to five years. That she is headed to her prom demonstrates not only the possibilities of modern medicine but the will of the teen and her mother, according to Tori's doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center, who in late January replaced her scarred, dysfunctional lungs with a donor set. "We can do a lot with technology, if we're not afraid to use it," said Dr. Aldo T. Iacono, medical director of Maryland's lung transplant program, one of the few in the country that will transplant scarce organs into someone so sick.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
For the first time in the six years since Victoria Chakwin was diagnosed with a deadly lung disease, the gown she wears won't be hospital issue. The 18-year-old from Martinsburg, W.Va., will go to her senior prom Saturday night in a red-and-black number she found on the Internet. A rite of passage for most teens, the event is more momentous for Victoria - who's known as Tori - because people diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis generally live only three to five years. That she is headed to her prom demonstrates not only the possibilities of modern medicine but the will of the teen and her mother, according to Tori's doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center, who in late January replaced her scarred, dysfunctional lungs with a donor set. "We can do a lot with technology, if we're not afraid to use it," said Dr. Aldo T. Iacono, medical director of Maryland's lung transplant program, one of the few in the country that will transplant scarce organs into someone so sick.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 14, 2010
John Alfred Aldrich, a retired electronics engineer and avid sailor, died Saturday of pulmonary fibrosis at the William Hill Manor retirement community in Easton. He was 87. The son of a Bethlehem Steel Corp. chief naval draftsman and a homemaker, Mr. Aldrich was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating from the Polytechnic Institute in 1940, he attended Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., for a year. He attended the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 24, 2011
Clifford Elmer Hughes Jr., a retired manager who learned to play the piano at 83 and wrote his autobiography three years later, died Jan. 14 of pulmonary fibrosis at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 89. Mr. Hughes was born at home in Baltimore on South Macon Street and raised in Highlandtown. After graduating in 1941 from City College, he went to work as a draftsman at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant. He studied marine design at the Maryland Institute College of Art and also at the Johns Hopkins University's McCoy College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 24, 2011
Clifford Elmer Hughes Jr., a retired manager who learned to play the piano at 83 and wrote his autobiography three years later, died Jan. 14 of pulmonary fibrosis at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 89. Mr. Hughes was born at home in Baltimore on South Macon Street and raised in Highlandtown. After graduating in 1941 from City College, he went to work as a draftsman at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant. He studied marine design at the Maryland Institute College of Art and also at the Johns Hopkins University's McCoy College.
NEWS
June 24, 1996
Terrel H. Bell,74, secretary of education from 1981 to 1985, died Saturday of pulmonary fibrosis in Salt Lake City.Pub Date: 6/24/96
NEWS
April 12, 2005
On February 28, 2005, after a courageous struggle with pulmonary fibrosis, Rocco Anthony Capobianco, 80, went Home to his Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. For more information, please go to baltimoresun.com.
NEWS
December 7, 2005
On December 5, 2005, ROLAND W. passed of Pulmonary Fibrosis; beloved husband of Jane A. Larkin (nee Polhamus); devoted father of Roland T. Larkin, Michele Mc Daniel, Alana Beksinski, Jeffrey Kirby and Ronilyn Sowa; dear brother of Dennis Larkin, Bonnie Mays, Sharlane Mc Donald and the late Karen Anderson and Sharon E. Larkin. Also survived by eight grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME OF BEL AIR, INC., 610 W. Mac Phail Road (at Route 24)
NEWS
August 29, 2003
On August 27, 2003, JAMES W. CANBY, devoted husband of Edith Canby; loving father of Christian and Ross Canby; dear son of Belva and the late James F. Canby. Funeral services will be held at the George J. Gonce Funeral Home, P.A., 4001 Ritchie Highway, on Friday, 8:30 A.M. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery at Crownsville. At family's request, donations may be made to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Association or American Lung Association.
NEWS
July 2, 2004
On June 26, 2004, MARTIN H. RAILA of Baltimore, MD., beloved husband of May T. Raila (nee Tripp), devoted father of Paul, Brian and Wayne, dear brother of Amelia Albright, loving grandfather of Travis, Kelly and Hannah. Also survived by many nieces, nephews and cousins. Memorial Service on Sunday, July 18 at Oak Crest Chapel, 8800 Walther Blvd., Parkville. Friends may call at 2 P.M. Service at 3 P.M. The family suggests memorial contributions if desired to Coalition for Pulmonary Fibrosis, 1685 Branham Lane, Suite 227, San Jose, CA 95118 or charities of your choice.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 14, 2010
John Alfred Aldrich, a retired electronics engineer and avid sailor, died Saturday of pulmonary fibrosis at the William Hill Manor retirement community in Easton. He was 87. The son of a Bethlehem Steel Corp. chief naval draftsman and a homemaker, Mr. Aldrich was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating from the Polytechnic Institute in 1940, he attended Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., for a year. He attended the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn.
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