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HEALTH
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
An Army sergeant and Catonsville native died of a treatable ailment in Iraq last month while awaiting medical care and after multiple doctor visits, his family said. Sgt. John F. Burner III, 32, died Sept. 16 in Iskandariya, Iraq, of a pulmonary embolism, his father said Tuesday. A pulmonary embolism occurs when a blood vessel in the lungs is blocked, usually by a clot. Patients are often given blood thinners, but if the clots are very large, they receive clot-busting drugs or undergo surgery.
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HEALTH
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
An Army sergeant and Catonsville native died of a treatable ailment in Iraq last month while awaiting medical care and after multiple doctor visits, his family said. Sgt. John F. Burner III, 32, died Sept. 16 in Iskandariya, Iraq, of a pulmonary embolism, his father said Tuesday. A pulmonary embolism occurs when a blood vessel in the lungs is blocked, usually by a clot. Patients are often given blood thinners, but if the clots are very large, they receive clot-busting drugs or undergo surgery.
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NEWS
July 4, 1997
Earl Hoekenga,81, former president and chief executive officer of Ryder Truck Lines, died Monday in Jacksonville, Fla., of a pulmonary embolism. He took over the company in 1966 when its annual revenue was $60 million. When he retired in 1981, its revenue had grown to $650 million.After retirement, Mr. Hoekenga formed Universal Select Inc., a company specializing in driver leasing, and Bridgestar Inc., a consulting firm for truck lines.Pub Date: 7/04/97
NEWS
May 11, 2009
Deep vein (or venous) thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) affect up to 900,000 Americans per year, and are the third leading cause of death in the U.S. after heart disease and cancer, says Dr. Michael Streiff, medical director of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions Anticoagulation Management Service and Outpatient Clinic. Here are five things that he says you should know about these conditions: * A DVT is a blood clot that develops in the deep veins of the arms or legs. A DVT can be fatal when it breaks off and travels through the bloodstream to the lungs, a phenomenon known as a pulmonary embolism (PE)
NEWS
May 4, 2003
James K. Baker, 83, a civil rights lawyer and the first black department head for the city of Birmingham, Ala., died Tuesday of a pulmonary embolism. Mr. Baker was credited for working to integrate everything from jury boxes to cemeteries in the Birmingham area. In one of Mr. Baker's hallmark cases, he argued successfully for a mother who was told she could not bury her son, a Vietnam War casualty, in Elmwood Cemetery because he was black. Michael Jendrzejczyk, 53, a human-rights expert whose advocacy on behalf of victims in Asian nations made him an unlikely power broker in Washington, died Thursday after collapsing during a walk near his office in Washington.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
Richard S. Moy told an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court jury yesterday that the happiest moment of his life was when his son was born early on the morning of May 21, 1986.But an hour after Richard S. Moy III was born at Anne Arundel Medical Center, Mr. Moy's 22-year-old wife suffered a seizure while in the recovery room. She died six days later at Johns Hopkins Hospital.A jury will have to decide whether the care administered by four Annapolis physicians contributed to Mrs. Moy's death, listed by physicians as being caused by pulmonary embolism.
NEWS
September 6, 1993
* Robert Zeppa, 68, a surgeon who developed a life-saving operation for cirrhosis patients, died on Thursday in Miami of a pulmonary embolism. He was president of the American Surgical Association in 1990-91, chairman of the American Board of Surgeons in 1982-84 and the recipient of a distinguished service award from the American College of Surgeons in 1990. In the late 1960s, he and Dr. Dean Warren developed the distal splenorenal shunt as a treatment for cirrhosis. The operation diverted blood from a damaged liver to avoid potentially deadly bleeding from that organ.
NEWS
May 11, 2009
Deep vein (or venous) thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) affect up to 900,000 Americans per year, and are the third leading cause of death in the U.S. after heart disease and cancer, says Dr. Michael Streiff, medical director of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions Anticoagulation Management Service and Outpatient Clinic. Here are five things that he says you should know about these conditions: * A DVT is a blood clot that develops in the deep veins of the arms or legs. A DVT can be fatal when it breaks off and travels through the bloodstream to the lungs, a phenomenon known as a pulmonary embolism (PE)
NEWS
August 24, 1996
O. V. "Mooney" Lynn,69, who coaxed his wife, Loretta, onto the stage for the first time and watched as the coal miner's daughter rose to country music stardom, died Thursday at his home in Nashville.The hard-drinking Mr. Lynn had been hospitalized repeatedly since 1993 because of heart failure and diabetes. His feet were amputated in recent years.Mr. Lynn was portrayed by Tommy Lee Jones in the 1980 movie "Coal Miner's Daughter," based on his wife's autobiography.He had been a coal miner and moonshine runner (hence the nickname "Mooney")
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
When NBC correspondent David Bloom died at age 39 in Iraq in 2003, he left behind three children and a stunned widow. "He had called a few days before and talked about his legs cramping up, but we didn't know then what we know now," Melanie Bloom said yesterday after coming to Baltimore to raise awareness of deep vein thrombosis. Bloom died of a pulmonary embolism resulting from DVT while traveling with the Army's 3rd Infantry Division in Iraq. Since then, his wife has become knowledgeable about the condition that killed him. At a medical conference at the Sheraton Baltimore City Center, Melanie Bloom, 44, recalled that her husband spent the weeks before his death riding and often sleeping in Army tanks, experiencing the kind of prolonged cramped quarters that can increase the risk of developing DVT. He had been living with a unit that was about three weeks into the Iraq war when he died April 6, 2003.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 19, 2008
Here's a little advice from someone who's been there: If you're ever having a health problem, don't research it on the Internet. It'll just scare the hell out of you. Let's say you've had, oh, indigestion for a few days. Type that into a search engine and see what happens. Here's what you'll discover from all the various medical Web sites: It could be heartburn. It could be acid reflux. It could be gallstones. Or it could be stomach cancer. Does that help? Does that put your mind at ease?
FEATURES
January 24, 2008
Simple behaviors shown to add years longevity Four simple behaviors -- being physically active, not smoking, drinking moderately and consuming fruits and vegetables -- can increase longevity as much as 14 years, researchers have found. The study, published recently in the online journal PLoS Medicine, surveyed 20,244 men and women (ages 45 to 79) in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 1997. The participants, none of whom had cardiovascular disease or cancer at the beginning of the study, were asked if they were nonsmokers, were physically active, had moderate alcohol consumption and ate five servings of fruits or vegetables a day. One point was assigned for each healthy behavior.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
When NBC correspondent David Bloom died at age 39 in Iraq in 2003, he left behind three children and a stunned widow. "He had called a few days before and talked about his legs cramping up, but we didn't know then what we know now," Melanie Bloom said yesterday after coming to Baltimore to raise awareness of deep vein thrombosis. Bloom died of a pulmonary embolism resulting from DVT while traveling with the Army's 3rd Infantry Division in Iraq. Since then, his wife has become knowledgeable about the condition that killed him. At a medical conference at the Sheraton Baltimore City Center, Melanie Bloom, 44, recalled that her husband spent the weeks before his death riding and often sleeping in Army tanks, experiencing the kind of prolonged cramped quarters that can increase the risk of developing DVT. He had been living with a unit that was about three weeks into the Iraq war when he died April 6, 2003.
NEWS
October 20, 2003
Thirty years ago, three physicians made a historic house call on Richard M. Nixon, who had resigned months earlier as president and was living in San Clemente, Calif. The doctors were appointed by federal Judge John J. Sirica to evaluate Nixon, whose personal physician said he was too ill to travel to Washington to testify in the Watergate trial of Nixon's former staffers. Richard S. Ross, then dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, was on the team that examined Nixon. Ross described that experience in a recent article for Transactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association, which is excerpted here.
NEWS
May 4, 2003
James K. Baker, 83, a civil rights lawyer and the first black department head for the city of Birmingham, Ala., died Tuesday of a pulmonary embolism. Mr. Baker was credited for working to integrate everything from jury boxes to cemeteries in the Birmingham area. In one of Mr. Baker's hallmark cases, he argued successfully for a mother who was told she could not bury her son, a Vietnam War casualty, in Elmwood Cemetery because he was black. Michael Jendrzejczyk, 53, a human-rights expert whose advocacy on behalf of victims in Asian nations made him an unlikely power broker in Washington, died Thursday after collapsing during a walk near his office in Washington.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2002
Joseph "Doc" Bartlinski, former coach, Baltimore Colts trainer and humanitarian, died yesterday afternoon of a pulmonary embolism at Harbor Hospital in Cherry Hill. Bartlinski, a longtime Linthicum resident, would have been 77 on Oct. 23. The son of a Pennsylvania coal miner, Bartlinski enlisted in the Army in World War II, right after his family moved to the Brooklyn area of Baltimore in 1942. "He came home from the war with shrapnel in his right knee, which led to a knee replacement, eventual complications and his right leg being amputated two years ago," said Joe Bartlinski Jr. After the war, Bartlinski started the Brooklyn Homes Boys Club in 1948, with 250 youths participating in football, softball and boxing.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2002
Joseph "Doc" Bartlinski, former coach, Baltimore Colts trainer and humanitarian, died yesterday afternoon of a pulmonary embolism at Harbor Hospital in Cherry Hill. Bartlinski, a longtime Linthicum resident, would have been 77 on Oct. 23. The son of a Pennsylvania coal miner, Bartlinski enlisted in the Army in World War II, right after his family moved to the Brooklyn area of Baltimore in 1942. "He came home from the war with shrapnel in his right knee, which led to a knee replacement, eventual complications and his right leg being amputated two years ago," said Joe Bartlinski Jr. After the war, Bartlinski started the Brooklyn Homes Boys Club in 1948, with 250 youths participating in football, softball and boxing.
FEATURES
January 24, 2008
Simple behaviors shown to add years longevity Four simple behaviors -- being physically active, not smoking, drinking moderately and consuming fruits and vegetables -- can increase longevity as much as 14 years, researchers have found. The study, published recently in the online journal PLoS Medicine, surveyed 20,244 men and women (ages 45 to 79) in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 1997. The participants, none of whom had cardiovascular disease or cancer at the beginning of the study, were asked if they were nonsmokers, were physically active, had moderate alcohol consumption and ate five servings of fruits or vegetables a day. One point was assigned for each healthy behavior.
NEWS
July 4, 1997
Earl Hoekenga,81, former president and chief executive officer of Ryder Truck Lines, died Monday in Jacksonville, Fla., of a pulmonary embolism. He took over the company in 1966 when its annual revenue was $60 million. When he retired in 1981, its revenue had grown to $650 million.After retirement, Mr. Hoekenga formed Universal Select Inc., a company specializing in driver leasing, and Bridgestar Inc., a consulting firm for truck lines.Pub Date: 7/04/97
NEWS
August 24, 1996
O. V. "Mooney" Lynn,69, who coaxed his wife, Loretta, onto the stage for the first time and watched as the coal miner's daughter rose to country music stardom, died Thursday at his home in Nashville.The hard-drinking Mr. Lynn had been hospitalized repeatedly since 1993 because of heart failure and diabetes. His feet were amputated in recent years.Mr. Lynn was portrayed by Tommy Lee Jones in the 1980 movie "Coal Miner's Daughter," based on his wife's autobiography.He had been a coal miner and moonshine runner (hence the nickname "Mooney")
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