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By Tim Smith and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Kevin Puts, a composer who teaches at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore, won the Pulitzer Prize in music Monday for his first opera. Puts, a member of the Peabody faculty since 2006, was honored for "Silent Night," a two-act work commissioned by the Minnesota Opera. "I'm still in a state of shock, and I'm trying to get my bearings," the composer said from Minneapolis, where "Silent Night" premiered in November. "It is an enormous thrill. " The opera was inspired by the 2005 film "Joyeux Noel," about the unofficial cease-fire that emerged spontaneously during Christmas 1914, when British, French and German troops socialized during a brief respite before the trench warfare resumed.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 18, 2014
The Pulitzer Prizes to two news outlets that cooperated with whistleblower Edward Snowden in the disclosure of widespread National Security Agency surveillance of electronic communications at home and abroad has U.S. officialdom in a dither. With the exiled Mr. Snowden harbored in Russia and widely branded at home as a traitor for leaking the voluminous evidence to reporters working for The Washington Post and the U.S. arm of Britain's Guardian newspaper, the Pulitzer committee came down squarely on the side of freedom of the press.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Alice C. Steinbach, the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for The Baltimore Sun, whose work captured the wonder and grace of people and places around the world, died Tuesday of cancer at her Roland Park Place home. She was 78. In her more than two-decade career with The Baltimore Sun, Ms. Steinbach took readers into close communion with her detailed profiles of the rich and famous from the world of entertainment, literature, politics, society and the arts. In a later career as a travel writer, her work took readers on strolls through places like the colorful back streets of Paris' Left Bank or, as she wrote, "the impossibly crowded Uffizi art gallery" in Florence.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 15, 2013
The 2013 Pulitzer Prizes were announced today, and among the winners is "Devil in the Grove," a non-fiction account of Baltimore native Thurgood Marshall's fearless work for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in a Florida case. As we all know, Marshall went on to bring the nation's landmark school integration case, Brown vs. Board of Education, and later became a U.S. Supreme Court justice. The winners: FICTION -- "The Orphan Master's Son" by Adam Johnson, DRAMA -- "Disgraced" by Ayad Akhtar, HISTORY -- "Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam" by Fredrik Logeval l (Random House)
NEWS
April 15, 1998
A NEW WORD entered the vocabulary of many Sun readers with the publication last year of a series of articles detailing the shameful practices within the "shipbreaking" industry.The Sun stories looked at the unsafe work conditions and pollution in the Port of Baltimore, in other U.S. port cities and in Third World countries brought about by shady operators of companies that break up old ships, many of them once-proud members of the U.S. Navy's fleet. It forced the federal government to re-examine its collusion in shipbreaking activities.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth L. Piccirillo | April 8, 2004
Acclaimed author Edward P. Jones will appear in Baltimore on Saturday, April 17, to headline the first-ever CityLit Festival. Jones' novel The Known World was just awarded the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. (It was also a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.) The festival will feature free workshops, exhibits and appearances by local authors and poets, including Tonya Matthews, Reggie Harris Sun reporter M. Dion Thompson and his former colleague Laura Lippman.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | October 3, 1996
Moneta J. Sleet Jr., who picked up a box camera while attending segregated schools in Kentucky and went on to become the first black to win journalism's top prize, for documenting the funeral of Martin Luther King Jr., died of cancer Monday in New York City. He was 70.In 1969, he won a Pulitzer Prize for feature photography after capturing the forlorn image of a veiled Coretta Scott King cradling her 5-year-old daughter on a crowded church pew.Although he spent the bulk of his career documenting America's slow march toward racial equality, he was almost denied the chance to take the photograph.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
LAST FALL, an argument between Orioles second-baseman Roberto Alomar and umpire John Hirschbeck ended with the player spitting on the umpire -- an outrage that almost led the umpires to boycott baseball's play-offs.After a suspension for the first five days of the season, the Baltimore Orioles star resumed play yesterday just as it was announced that Lisa Pollak, a feature writer for The Sun, won a Pulitzer Prize for her story about the umpire's sons and their battles with a deadly disease.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | April 12, 1998
This Tuesday, at 3 p.m. at Columbia University, the annual Pulitzer Prizes will be announced. For a couple of dozen people all around America, there will occur a moment of singular ecstasy.There are 14 prizes in individual categories of journalism, including a gold medal for public service by a newspaper. There are also prizes for fiction, history, poetry, biography or autobiography, general non-fiction, drama and music.There are more than a dozen other national prizes in journalism, and hundreds of local ones, but none is remotely as coveted or as honored as the Pulitzers.
FEATURES
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | April 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux had a good day yesterday, winning two awards in the Pulitzer Prize arts categories: in fiction for "The Hours," a novel by Michael Cunningham, and non-fiction for "Annals of the Former World" by John McPhee."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 10, 2013
An old reporter often begins his daily routine by turning to the newspaper's obituary page with mild trepidation, fearing another friend has gone to that great newsroom in the sky. So it was this week in reading of the death in Baltimore, at only 62, of Richard Ben Cramer, arguably the best writer of a presidential campaign chronicle ever. That would be his 1,047-page opus of one of the less memorable contests, in 1988, among six less-than-heroic candidates: Republicans George H.W. Bush, the eventual winner, and Bob Dole; and Democrats Michael Dukakis, the eventual party nominee, Richard Gephardt, Joe Biden and Gary Hart.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who later became a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer and an acclaimed author chronicling the lives of politicians and legendary sports figures, died Monday of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Mr. Cramer, who was 62, lived in Chestertown. "Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our Republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people," Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, a friend, said in a statement released Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
Junot - and Yunior - are back. Junot Diaz is the MacArthur Fellowship-winning writer whose work reflects his Dominican roots and his Jersey youth, and who has dazzled critics and audiences with a virtuosic narrative voice that weaves tales of young men similar to the ones he grew up with. Yunior is one of Diaz's most indelible characters - brilliant, posturing, alienated, self-destructive and, for better or worse, unable to fully inhabit his own mask. Readers previously met Yunior in the 2006 short-story collection "Drown" and in the novel "The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao," which won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize.
NEWS
June 6, 2012
1931 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, "An Old Struggle Still Going On" 1934 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, " California With Pride" 1937 - John W. Owens, for the body of his work in editorial cartooning 1940 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, "The Outstretched Hand" 1944 - Dewey Fleming, for distinguished national reporting 1945 - Mark Watson, for international reporting from London and the war fronts in...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
There are unexpected perks that can come with receiving a Pulitzer Prize, as composer Kevin Puts discovered last Tuesday. "It was 'Kevin Puts Day' here," he said by phone from his home in Yonkers, N.Y. "There was a nice ceremony with the mayor. I got a plaque. I never had a day named after me. " Puts, a Peabody Institute faculty member since 2006, won the Pulitzer for "Silent Night," an opera about the unauthorized Christmas truce in the midst of World War I, when troops from both sides of the trenches emerged to celebrate Christmas together before the killing resumed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Kevin Puts, a composer who teaches at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore, won the Pulitzer Prize in music Monday for his first opera. Puts, a member of the Peabody faculty since 2006, was honored for "Silent Night," a two-act work commissioned by the Minnesota Opera. "I'm still in a state of shock, and I'm trying to get my bearings," the composer said from Minneapolis, where "Silent Night" premiered in November. "It is an enormous thrill. " The opera was inspired by the 2005 film "Joyeux Noel," about the unofficial cease-fire that emerged spontaneously during Christmas 1914, when British, French and German troops socialized during a brief respite before the trench warfare resumed.
NEWS
April 8, 1997
The Baltimore Sun's management and staff congratulate feature writer Lisa Pollak on winning the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing.While the nation focused on an ugly incident, Lisa saw a story no one else was telling: What was it like to be John Hirschbeck ` to survive the death of one son and to wake up every day knowing that another son suffered from the same disease.Lisa's story in The Sun went beyond the event being covered by every other newspaper in America. Only hers revealed the human drama behind the story.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2000
William K. Marimow, managing editor of The Sun and a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, was promoted yesterday to editor and senior vice president, the newspaper's top editorial position. Marimow, 52, replaces John S. Carroll, who became the top editor of the Los Angeles Times yesterday after nine years in the post at The Sun. Michael E. Waller, publisher of The Sun, announced the appointment to newsroom employees yesterday afternoon. He later said the decision to promote Marimow was made quickly, easily and without considering candidates from outside the company.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 16, 2012
The 2012 Pulitzer Prizes award today had a big gap -- there was no winner in the fiction category, which must have ticked off a whole lot of marketing execs. What will they do with all the "Winner of the Pulitzer Prize" stickers they had printed up for their covers? The finalists were not a shoddy bunch: "Train Dreams" by Denis Johnson, "Swamplandia!" by Karen Russell and "The Pale King," by the late David Foster Wallace.  Other highly acclaimed novels of 2011 would have been worthy winners, too. Among them: "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach and "The Tiger's Wife" by Téa Obreht.
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