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By Henry Scarupa | April 12, 1991
"The Civil Rights Era" -- written by Hugh Davis Graham, a history professor at the University of Maryland Baltimore County -- was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in history pTC awarded earlier this week.Mr. Graham could not be reached for comment yesterday. Earlier, he described the work, published last fall by Oxford University Press, as a "trilogy on Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon," and a case study on policy relating to civil rights.A native of Arkansas who grew up in Tennessee, Mr. Graham, 54, completed his undergraduate study at Yale and went on for a Ph.D.
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By Jules Witcover | April 18, 2014
The Pulitzer Prizes to two news outlets that cooperated with whistleblower Edward Snowden in the disclosure of widespread National Security Agency surveillance of electronic communications at home and abroad has U.S. officialdom in a dither. With the exiled Mr. Snowden harbored in Russia and widely branded at home as a traitor for leaking the voluminous evidence to reporters working for The Washington Post and the U.S. arm of Britain's Guardian newspaper, the Pulitzer committee came down squarely on the side of freedom of the press.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 24, 2003
NEW YORK - Mark von Hagen, a Columbia University history professor hired by The New York Times to assess the coverage of one of its correspondents in the Soviet Union during the 1930s, said Wednesday that the 1932 Pulitzer Prize the reporter received should be rescinded because of his "lack of balance" in covering Stalin's government. The Pulitzer Board had told the Times that it received complaints, many from Ukrainian-Americans, that Walter Duranty should be punished for failing to report on a famine that killed millions of Ukrainians.
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By Dave Rosenthal | April 15, 2013
The 2013 Pulitzer Prizes were announced today, and among the winners is "Devil in the Grove," a non-fiction account of Baltimore native Thurgood Marshall's fearless work for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in a Florida case. As we all know, Marshall went on to bring the nation's landmark school integration case, Brown vs. Board of Education, and later became a U.S. Supreme Court justice. The winners: FICTION -- "The Orphan Master's Son" by Adam Johnson, DRAMA -- "Disgraced" by Ayad Akhtar, HISTORY -- "Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam" by Fredrik Logeval l (Random House)
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By Mike Pride and By Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | October 21, 2001
Pulitzer: A Life, by Denis Brian. John Wiley & Sons. 438 pages. $30. Joseph Pulitzer translated pluck, luck and sweat into the classic American success story. As a penniless 18-year-old Hungarian, he jumped ship into Boston Harbor to ensure that he, not the man who recruited him in Europe, got his Union army enlistment bonus. In short order, he became a lawyer, a Missouri state senator and a newspaper owner. Having succeeded as a publisher in St. Louis, he combined his work ethic, ingenuity and brain power to transform The World in New York City into a powerful metropolitan daily.
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By New York Times News Service | April 28, 1991
A. B. Guthrie Jr., a Kentucky journalist who turned to fiction and won a Pulitzer Prize as one of the century's leading Western historical novelists, died Friday at his home at Choteau, Mont. He was 90.Carl D. Brandt, his agent, said he died of lung failure. He had been in poor health for several months.Mr. Guthrie, who won the Pulitzer in 1949 for his novel "The Way West," also wrote the screenplay for the 1953 motion picture "Shane."His final book, "A Field Guide to Writing Fiction," was published two weeks ago. His published works consisted of six novels, a book of essays, a children's book, a book of poems and five mystery novels.
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By Jean Patteson and Jean Patteson,Orlando Sentinel | June 9, 1994
Palm Beach -- Lilly is back.That's Lilly Pulitzer Rousseau, the socialite/bohemian designer who Time magazine once called the "barefoot tycoon." Also Lilly Pulitzer, the line of colorful, casual fashions that once were the hit of every preppy resort up and down the East Coast.Neither the designer nor her designs have changed much in the 10 years they have been absent from the fashion scene. Both are as colorful and free-spirited as ever."Lilly should never have gone away. It only happened because she decided she wasn't having as much fun anymore," said Scott Beaumont.
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By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 14, 1995
Hoboken, N.J. -- Yes, she is warm and funny. Yes, she is smart and insightful. Yes, she is down-to-earth and real, confessional almost, a woman more than willing to dish on any subject that comes up: motherhood, success, romance, feminism, self-doubts, marriage and how much her husband likes short skirts and hates flannel nightgowns.And yes, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and best-selling novelist Anna Quindlen in person is just like Anna Quindlen in print: the kind of woman you'd like to have as your best friend.
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By BOSTON GLOBE | February 16, 1998
BOSTON -- The Boston Police Department, in an unusually aggressive public relations counterattack, is lobbying the Pulitzer Prize board in a bid to ensure that a Boston Globe series exposing police wrongdoing does not win journalism's highest honor.In an eight-page, single-spaced letter sent to the 19-member board Feb. 6, the department's director of media relations, Sergeant Detective Margot H. Hill, contends that the Globe articles and material supporting the Pulitzer entry unfairly minimized the department's anti-corruption efforts.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 1997
This year marks the 14th time in its 80-year history that the Pulitzer Prize for drama was not awarded. No original American play dealing with American life -- that's the wording of the criteria -- was deemed worthy of the Pulitzer's national cachet.It happens every so often with the journalism awards. In 1993, for instance, no prize was given for editorial writing.But in the arts and letters categories, where the works under consideration are themselves more subjective, the awards process is also more prone to complications.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Humorist Dave Barry, historian Doris Kearns Goodwin and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak are among those taking part in the 2013-2014 Baltimore Speakers Series. The seven-speaker series, sponsored by Stevenson University, kicks off Sept. 30 with author and humorist Bill Bryson, whose books include "A Short History of Nearly Everything" and "At Home: A Short History of Private Life. " Other speakers scheduled for 2013 are George Papandreou, prime minister of Greece from 2009 to 2011 (Oct.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The math is daunting: More than 2,300 pages of prose winnowed down to 190, including photographs and the occasional blank sheet that signals chapter breaks. Yet, that's exactly the challenge that author and historian Taylor Branch tackled when he condensed his three-part history of the U.S. civil rights movement into one slender volume that could be taught in the nation's classrooms. Never mind that Branch, now 66, devoted more than 25 years of his life to crafting his acclaimed trilogy.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who later became a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer and an acclaimed author chronicling the lives of politicians and legendary sports figures, died Monday of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Mr. Cramer, who was 62, lived in Chestertown. "Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our Republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people," Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, a friend, said in a statement released Tuesday.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
Junot - and Yunior - are back. Junot Diaz is the MacArthur Fellowship-winning writer whose work reflects his Dominican roots and his Jersey youth, and who has dazzled critics and audiences with a virtuosic narrative voice that weaves tales of young men similar to the ones he grew up with. Yunior is one of Diaz's most indelible characters - brilliant, posturing, alienated, self-destructive and, for better or worse, unable to fully inhabit his own mask. Readers previously met Yunior in the 2006 short-story collection "Drown" and in the novel "The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao," which won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
After a successful inaugural three-play season at its Eastport Shopping Center location, Compass Rose Studio Theater opens its second season with Christopher Sergel's stage adaptation of Harper Lee's acclaimed novel "To Kill a Mockingbird. " The play's strong script and powerful message make it an ideal vehicle for the Annapolis acting academy-theater. "Since opening its doors to students in 2010, Compass Rose has reached over 400 from age 3 to senior citizens in 10 Anne Arundel venues," founding artistic director Lucinda Merry-Browne said.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
A brash notice of reporter openings by Dolan Media of New Orleans got some attention in the trade last week. Here is what my colleague Bruce Holtgren had to say about the request in it for aspirants to mail examples of their best work: I would hope you are well aware that all clips have been edited. Great editors, time and again, elevate stories that came in as pretty good to great, or from great to awesome; or even mediocre to fantastic. They catch gaping holes and save reporters' shoddy work; they suggest angles that the reporter didn't think of. Editors fix horrendous errors of spelling, grammar, punctuation, facts, local history, even prominent people's names.
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By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2004
Eddie Adams, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning photo of a Vietnamese officer executing a Viet Cong prisoner in the streets of Saigon became an enduring symbol of the brutality of the Vietnam War, died yesterday in his New York home. He was 71. Mr. Adams died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, his assistant, Jessica Stuart, told the Associated Press. In May, he received a diagnosis of a rapid strain of the incurable neurological disorder and quickly lost his speech and became increasingly incapacitated.
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By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2003
Diana K. Sugg, a medical reporter for The Sun, won journalism's highest honor yesterday for a series of articles ranging from stillbirths to sepsis to the controversial practice of hospitals allowing families to comfort loved ones in emergency rooms. The Pulitzer Prize was presented to Sugg for beat reporting. It was the paper's 15th Pulitzer, following awards in 1997 and 1998 for feature writing and investigative reporting. Two other entries by The Sun were Pulitzer finalists this year.
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June 6, 2012
1931 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, "An Old Struggle Still Going On" 1934 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, " California With Pride" 1937 - John W. Owens, for the body of his work in editorial cartooning 1940 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, "The Outstretched Hand" 1944 - Dewey Fleming, for distinguished national reporting 1945 - Mark Watson, for international reporting from London and the war fronts in...
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
There are unexpected perks that can come with receiving a Pulitzer Prize, as composer Kevin Puts discovered last Tuesday. "It was 'Kevin Puts Day' here," he said by phone from his home in Yonkers, N.Y. "There was a nice ceremony with the mayor. I got a plaque. I never had a day named after me. " Puts, a Peabody Institute faculty member since 2006, won the Pulitzer for "Silent Night," an opera about the unauthorized Christmas truce in the midst of World War I, when troops from both sides of the trenches emerged to celebrate Christmas together before the killing resumed.
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