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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 17, 2004
SEATTLE - The Bush administration yesterday proposed placing killer whales that reside in Washington state's Puget Sound on the list of endangered species, in an effort to save the last 84 of the acrobatic, often photographed orcas. National Marine Fisheries Service, which ruled two years ago that endangered species protections were unwarranted, reversed itself after a federal judge ordered it to reconsider its legal justifications. "It was never a question of whether we cared about the whales or not," said Robert Lohn, northwest regional administrator of the fisheries service.
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NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
Some of us have a hard time looking beyond today. But when it comes to thinking about growth and development - perennial hot topics virtually everywhere - what if we took a longer view? What do we want our communities to look like? Not next year, or 10 or even 20 years from now. A century from now. That's what nearly 100 businesses, civic and environmental groups, government agencies and hundreds of citizens have done in the region bordering Washington's Puget Sound. Starting four years ago, the participants hammered out the "Cascade Agenda," a call to conserve working forests, farmlands, shorelines, parks and natural areas while also making cities and towns attractive places to live, work and raise families.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2002
EVERETT, Wash. -- Three decades ago, hunters dropped nets into the deep, blue waters of Puget Sound and rounded up seven orcas, including a 6-year-old female calf caught off the rugged coastline of the San Juan Islands. Like other orcas, or killer whales, captured in Puget Sound in the mid-1960s and early 1970s, the killer whales were sold and shipped to marine parks around the world. The female calf -- who became known as Lolita -- ended up at the Miami Seaquarium, where she still lives and today is the focal point of a grass-roots campaign to return her to the wilds of the Pacific Northwest.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 17, 2004
SEATTLE - The Bush administration yesterday proposed placing killer whales that reside in Washington state's Puget Sound on the list of endangered species, in an effort to save the last 84 of the acrobatic, often photographed orcas. National Marine Fisheries Service, which ruled two years ago that endangered species protections were unwarranted, reversed itself after a federal judge ordered it to reconsider its legal justifications. "It was never a question of whether we cared about the whales or not," said Robert Lohn, northwest regional administrator of the fisheries service.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | December 4, 1992
In a remarkable feat of seismic detective work, five teams of scientists have gathered compelling evidence to show that a strong, shallow earthquake about 1,000 years ago rocked the ground precisely where Seattle stands now.A similar quake today -- well within the bounds of probability -- could churn the ground violently beneath the modern city and damage a wide and heavily populated region, according to experts assessing the new findings.Although the Puget Sound region is not known for constant, damaging quakes, as are the infamous San Francisco and Southern California segments of the San Andreas Fault, seismologists in the Seattle area say the new findings indicate that the quake danger there may be greater than scientists had believed.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
Some of us have a hard time looking beyond today. But when it comes to thinking about growth and development - perennial hot topics virtually everywhere - what if we took a longer view? What do we want our communities to look like? Not next year, or 10 or even 20 years from now. A century from now. That's what nearly 100 businesses, civic and environmental groups, government agencies and hundreds of citizens have done in the region bordering Washington's Puget Sound. Starting four years ago, the participants hammered out the "Cascade Agenda," a call to conserve working forests, farmlands, shorelines, parks and natural areas while also making cities and towns attractive places to live, work and raise families.
NEWS
By Rebecca W. Boylan | May 24, 1992
THE LIVING. Annie Dillard. HarperCollins.416 pages. $22.50. Novels about what happened to America's pioneers are plentiful. Novels about what America's pioneers thought about are far fewer. Annie Dillard, the author of such nonfiction works as the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek," has written her first novel, "The Living," about Puget Sound's earliest settlements -- the American Indians, Asians, Europeans, Canadians and white settlers who merged there.Farmers, miners, hermits, murderers, mothers, shopkeepers, fishermen, realists and idealists, the mad and the sane -- all these are portrayed not only as themselves but also as representatives of the strong and weak, the misguided and perceptive, and the stagnant and expansive.
FEATURES
By Susan Mcgrath and Susan Mcgrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 8, 1992
In 1969, the Cuyahoga River in Ohio caught fire. Its waters were so heavily contaminated with industrial solvents and wastes that the river simply burned.That's hard for us to imagine these days, but the Cuyahoga was just one of thousands of filthy waterways. Across the country, our surface waters -- rivers and lakes and streams -- were in shocking condition.People were astounded by the photographs of the burning river, and the fire on the Cuyahoga became a turning point for America. The Clean Waters Act was passed and, within a decade, America's rivers and lakes and streams and bays began to look like rivers and lakes and streams and bays again.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
A Memorable Place Years later, Bonaire still feels like home By Lauren Magnuson SPECIAL TO THE SUN It has been said that you can never go home again. The fear of returning to a former home and finding things radically changed caused me to put off a long-promised trip back to the island of Bonaire, where I had lived for 12 years and had given birth to my three children. When we left the island in 1994, I promised the children that one day we would return. But the years passed, and soon the children, now adolescents, would be leaving home for their own journeys.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2003
GROTON, Conn. -- Forty years ago in the summer of 1963, a writer for The New Yorker named Morton M. Hunt spent two weeks circumnavigating Long Island Sound in a little sailboat. When he sat down to write, he mourned. A way of life was disappearing. The old culture of the sound -- a still wild mix of scruffy boatyards, Gold Coast snobs and fishermen, all set against the vast mirror of nature -- would surely be homogenized and pushed to the brink, Hunt wrote in the magazine, by the pell-mell rush of suburbanization and the mass market.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2003
GROTON, Conn. -- Forty years ago in the summer of 1963, a writer for The New Yorker named Morton M. Hunt spent two weeks circumnavigating Long Island Sound in a little sailboat. When he sat down to write, he mourned. A way of life was disappearing. The old culture of the sound -- a still wild mix of scruffy boatyards, Gold Coast snobs and fishermen, all set against the vast mirror of nature -- would surely be homogenized and pushed to the brink, Hunt wrote in the magazine, by the pell-mell rush of suburbanization and the mass market.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
A Memorable Place Years later, Bonaire still feels like home By Lauren Magnuson SPECIAL TO THE SUN It has been said that you can never go home again. The fear of returning to a former home and finding things radically changed caused me to put off a long-promised trip back to the island of Bonaire, where I had lived for 12 years and had given birth to my three children. When we left the island in 1994, I promised the children that one day we would return. But the years passed, and soon the children, now adolescents, would be leaving home for their own journeys.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2002
EVERETT, Wash. -- Three decades ago, hunters dropped nets into the deep, blue waters of Puget Sound and rounded up seven orcas, including a 6-year-old female calf caught off the rugged coastline of the San Juan Islands. Like other orcas, or killer whales, captured in Puget Sound in the mid-1960s and early 1970s, the killer whales were sold and shipped to marine parks around the world. The female calf -- who became known as Lolita -- ended up at the Miami Seaquarium, where she still lives and today is the focal point of a grass-roots campaign to return her to the wilds of the Pacific Northwest.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | December 4, 1992
In a remarkable feat of seismic detective work, five teams of scientists have gathered compelling evidence to show that a strong, shallow earthquake about 1,000 years ago rocked the ground precisely where Seattle stands now.A similar quake today -- well within the bounds of probability -- could churn the ground violently beneath the modern city and damage a wide and heavily populated region, according to experts assessing the new findings.Although the Puget Sound region is not known for constant, damaging quakes, as are the infamous San Francisco and Southern California segments of the San Andreas Fault, seismologists in the Seattle area say the new findings indicate that the quake danger there may be greater than scientists had believed.
FEATURES
By Susan Mcgrath and Susan Mcgrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 8, 1992
In 1969, the Cuyahoga River in Ohio caught fire. Its waters were so heavily contaminated with industrial solvents and wastes that the river simply burned.That's hard for us to imagine these days, but the Cuyahoga was just one of thousands of filthy waterways. Across the country, our surface waters -- rivers and lakes and streams -- were in shocking condition.People were astounded by the photographs of the burning river, and the fire on the Cuyahoga became a turning point for America. The Clean Waters Act was passed and, within a decade, America's rivers and lakes and streams and bays began to look like rivers and lakes and streams and bays again.
NEWS
By Rebecca W. Boylan | May 24, 1992
THE LIVING. Annie Dillard. HarperCollins.416 pages. $22.50. Novels about what happened to America's pioneers are plentiful. Novels about what America's pioneers thought about are far fewer. Annie Dillard, the author of such nonfiction works as the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek," has written her first novel, "The Living," about Puget Sound's earliest settlements -- the American Indians, Asians, Europeans, Canadians and white settlers who merged there.Farmers, miners, hermits, murderers, mothers, shopkeepers, fishermen, realists and idealists, the mad and the sane -- all these are portrayed not only as themselves but also as representatives of the strong and weak, the misguided and perceptive, and the stagnant and expansive.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | January 16, 1992
Carefully arranged on a bed of ice, the fish on the counter at Capitol Seafood in Jessup looked like a still-life composition.Gold-striped wild rockfish, their lips sporting blue plastic tags, lay in the upper left corner. Just below them were the smaller, dish-faced hybrid rocks raised on farms. To the right, the bright color of several red snappers contrasted with the plain brown of the flounder below.Framed by these lesser species, two large, silver-sided creatures formed the composition's centerpiece.
NEWS
October 17, 1993
TACOMA, Wash. -- Leroy Ostransky, a longtime composer, music educator and author of three books on jazz, died Monday at age 75.Mr. Ostransky was a professor emeritus of music and composer-in-residence at the University of Puget Sound.He composed five symphonies and a comic opera, "The Melting of Molly." He also wrote an autobiographical memoir, "Sharkey's Kid."@
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