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By Rob Kasper | November 4, 2001
When Terry Ann Moore was thinking up ways to serve oysters, she thought of wrapping them in puff pastry. "Everybody likes to eat puff pastry," Moore told me in a telephone conversation from her Oaklyn, N. J., home. So she wrapped the pastry around oysters, filled it with minced vegetables and cream cheese, and baked it. Then she topped the pastry with an unusual pesto sauce, made with spinach, not basil. In most of the pesto sauces she tasted, the basil was too strong, she said. "I like basil, but not in that quantity, so I used spinach."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
In the Valentine's Day of your fantasies, you'd spend hours preparing a gourmet dinner for two, enjoying champagne and savoring dessert with the object of your affection. Your reality, however, may be decidedly less romantic. You've worked all week, and the pantry is bare. The thought of whipping up a homemade meal leaves you cold. And, of course, your favorite romantic restaurant has been booked for weeks. Yet Cupid doesn't have to pass you by this Valentine's Day. Thanks to the prepared-food and catering departments of your local grocer, it's easier than ever to dine in, whether you've got a few days, hours or mere minutes to prepare.  Across the Baltimore region, several national supermarket chains and family-owned grocery stores are offering Valentine's Day-themed meals that are ready to eat or require only minimal time in the oven or microwave.
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NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 5, 1999
For several dinner parties this summer, I have prepared variations of the same dessert. I've been making Napoleons with store-bought puff pastry and filling them with assorted berries, fruits and flavored whipped cream. For example, I combined red and black raspberries along with blueberries for one version, then tried peaches and blackberries for another. For a meal with company later this week, I am planning to pair peaches with red raspberries. For the whipped-cream garnish, I can choose dark rum, brandy or bourbon, any of which would complement the taste of summer fruit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | October 4, 2011
Even though there's something like 981 cooking competition shows out there (an estimate), we're still intrigued by Food Network's "Sweet Genius. "    The host/judge, acclaimed chef Ron Ben-Israel, is intriguingly mysterious and off-the-wall : ordering the chefs to cook frozen desserts with hard-boiled eggs? OK, then! Each episode features a new group of four pastry chefs competing for culinary glory ... and $10,000. Baltimore's Anisha Jagtap , 26, the pastry chef at Puffs & Pastries and the owner/chef at Baltimore Burger Bar, shows what she's made of on Thursday's episode (10 p.m.)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 3, 2002
When good friends e-mailed us several weeks ago to ask if they might spend the night at our house while traveling through New England, we immediately invited them to stay with us. However, after recording the date in my calendar, I realized that the couple's arrival would be two days after I returned from a trans-Atlantic working trip. Aware that I would be jet-lagged, I didn't think I would have the energy to undertake dinner, so a reservation was booked in a nearby restaurant. Because our guests adore good food and frequently write on culinary subjects, I felt embarrassed about not cooking for them and decided to prepare appetizers to serve with wine beforehand.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom HTC and Betty Rosbottom HTC,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 18, 1998
This is the season when our friends and family all love to come for a visit. At no other time of the year is the scenery in New England quite so splendid as during fall, with its colorful foliage. From September to November, our calendar is marked with dates when friends will arrive. So far this autumn, we have had guests on two separate weekends, given two dinner parties and invited many out-of-towners "just passing through" to have appetizers and drinks with us.This rush of fall entertaining has meant that I have spent extra time in the kitchen.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus | November 29, 2006
What's the difference between piecrust, puff pastry and pate brisee? They are all pastry doughs, mixtures of flour, fat and liquid that are used to make pies or their French equivalent, tarts. What makes pastry dough different from bread dough is that the latter is supposed to rise, while the former should just lie there. But pastry dough does have a job. Besides encasing whatever it has been filled with, it also should bake to a crumbly or flaky texture. If you've ever made pastry dough, you'll remember being exhorted by the recipe not to mix the dough too much.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom | August 22, 1993
A quick way to make a delicious plum tart: Puff pastry is rolled and shaped into a free-standing pastry shell, then filled with a mixture of almond paste, eggs, lemon juice and zest, and flour. The tart is topped with plum wedges and baked until the crust is golden brown.Plum-almond tartMakes 6 to 8 servings1 (about 9 3/4 -by-9-inch) sheet frozen puff pastry, defrosted (see note)1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened1/2 cup (4 ounces) almond paste, broken into chunks1 tablespoon granulated sugar1 tablespoon grated lemon zest (grated color portion of rind)
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | May 28, 2000
Salads aren't the only showcase for spring's bounty of sweet, young vegetables. Another classic way to celebrate first-of-the-season delicacies, from pencil-slim asparagus to petits pois and baby zucchini, is to highlight them in a soup or stew. The youngest, most tender members of the vegetable kingdom are fragile, quickly turning limp when carelessly handled or stored. And because they cook much more quickly than their mature counterparts, leaving these sweet, young things even a minute too long over heat can destroy their nutrients and their firm texture and fresh color.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
Get a jump start on fall's bounty with the a sweet treat featuring apples and ready-made puff pastry. If you like, sprinkle the finished dessert with powdered sugar. This recipe is from the New Zealand Fruit Co.Apple Tart2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, quartered and cored1 teaspoon lemon juice1 tablespoon melted butter4 2 1/2 -inch frozen round puff pastry shells, thawed1/2 teaspoon cinnamon2 tablespoons sugarSlice apples into 1/4 -inch thick slices; toss with lemon juice and butter. Roll out puff pastry shells into 5-inch circles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
The dual restaurant space at 1300 Bank St. near Little Italy always struck me as odd. When it opened, it had a Thai restaurant, Lemongrass, and a pan-Asian restaurant, Tsunami, so close together that they shared a kitchen. Lemongrass took off, but its sister restaurant didn't - probably because it was perceived as simply a more expensive version of the first place. The new owners of the restaurants (who also own Red Star in Fells Point) have taken a different approach. They have turned the pan-Asian restaurant into Diablita Cantina, a casual Mexican place that's a step up from the usual tacos-and-fajitas factory.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
The dual restaurant space at 1300 Bank St. near Little Italy always struck me as odd. When it opened, it had a Thai restaurant, Lemongrass, and a pan-Asian restaurant, Tsunami, so close together that they shared a kitchen. Lemongrass took off, but its sister restaurant didn't - probably because it was perceived as simply a more expensive version of the first place. The new owners of the restaurants (who also own Red Star in Fells Point) have taken a different approach. They have turned the pan-Asian restaurant into Diablita Cantina, a casual Mexican place that's a step up from the usual tacos-and-fajitas factory.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | April 5, 2008
Back in the 1970s and '80s, I spent hours in the kitchen preparing for dinner parties. I thought nothing of making my own pasta, pates and pastries from scratch, and my menus were so long that they could take up a whole page when written out. Typically, I served my guests an array of homemade appetizers first, then a substantial first course, followed by an entree and several sides. The meal ended with dessert, coffee and liqueurs. Thank goodness those days are over! I get weary just thinking about such fancy flights of entertaining.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | October 24, 2007
The Tatin sisters of the French Loire Valley may or may not have invented the baking of caramelized apples upside-down in pastry, but the classic Tarte Tatin is indelibly branded with their name. In her classic Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Julia Child calls her recipe La Tarte des Demoiselles Tatin, or the "tart of the unmarried sisters Tatin." The convenience of frozen puff pastry makes this fall treat easy to pull together. Faith Kling, a pastry chef and chef instructor at Baltimore International College, has developed a few rules for hers.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 17, 2007
When some of our friends (whose lineage is Irish) discovered that St. Patrick's Day fell on a Saturday this year, they didn't waste any time planning a party. By the time I received their e-mail, they had decided on a Shamrock Potluck. Since my family's ancestry includes some Irish genes, I was equally enthusiastic about being part of a casual get-together to celebrate this holiday. I also knew exactly what I would volunteer to make. For the past six months, I have been working on a soup cookbook, and one dish I have wanted to create for the collection is a corned beef and cabbage potage.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,Sun reporter | February 14, 2007
Working the Plate: The Art of Food Presentation By Christopher Styler Puff Pastry Perfection By Camilla V. Saulsbury Cumberland House / 2006 / $16.95 Want to make your guests think you fussed, when you really took the easy way out? This book is for you. All 175 recipes call for a secret, corner-cutting ingredient: store-bought puff pastry. Making "the royalty of pastries" takes a lot of work, but Camilla V. Saulsbury says the store-bought frozen stuff is good enough to pass for homemade.
FEATURES
By Cathy Barber and Cathy Barber,Universal Press Syndicate | December 29, 1993
Crackers are as easy to make as cookies.The techniques are the same. Some are rolled thin and cut, others rolled in a log and sliced, still others dropped from a spoon. One version of Cheddar cheese straws starts with store-bought puff pastry.These delicate nibbles are rich enough to serve alone, with pre-dinner drinks. Or, pair them with soup for a filling lunch.RF Keep your crackers fresh by storing them in an airtight container.Cheddar cheese strawsMakes 18 straws1 6-by-9-inch sheet puff pastry1 egg, beaten1 cup grated Cheddar cheesepaprikaHeat oven to 375 degrees.
FEATURES
By Charles Britton and Charles Britton,Copley News Service | January 27, 1993
Greater love hath no cook . . . than making puff pastry for his heart's desire. It's among the most arduous of kitchen jobs, right up there with peeling chestnuts and filling and sealing your own ravioli.And making this flaky pastry from scratch ranks as a tricky operation, too, for chances are that the stuff won't come out right the first time. Or the second. Successful practitioners of puff pastry are made, not born.Fortunately, crass commerce has provided a shortcut to this culinary accomplishment.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus | November 29, 2006
What's the difference between piecrust, puff pastry and pate brisee? They are all pastry doughs, mixtures of flour, fat and liquid that are used to make pies or their French equivalent, tarts. What makes pastry dough different from bread dough is that the latter is supposed to rise, while the former should just lie there. But pastry dough does have a job. Besides encasing whatever it has been filled with, it also should bake to a crumbly or flaky texture. If you've ever made pastry dough, you'll remember being exhorted by the recipe not to mix the dough too much.
NEWS
By DONNA DEANE and DONNA DEANE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 3, 2006
First, a French friend brings a spectacular homemade dessert to dinner. It's a Paris-Brest - a large ring of choux paste sliced horizontally, filled with praline pastry cream and whipped cream and topped with toasted almonds. Next, Thomas Keller opens Bouchon Bakery in the Time Warner Center in New York City, with a whole section on the dessert menu dedicated to pastries made with choux paste, or as it's called in French, pate a choux. Could a pate a choux revival be coming? And what is pate a choux, anyway?
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