Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPublic Water
IN THE NEWS

Public Water

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 1, 2011
From the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, Aug. 3, 1961: Water and sewerage was the big news in Harford County 50 years ago this week. The Aegis reported that Harford County received its master plan for providing public water and sewerage facilities from Whitman, Requardt and Associates in a study that cost $22,500 for a plan that was expected to cost an estimated $11.2 million for the first phase. It also projected the whole project would ultimately cost the county an estimated $37.5 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
State and federal officials announced Friday they were providing $8 million to pipe clean public water to 270 homes near Salisbury where a toxic solvent has contaminated the ground water supplying residential wells there. Authorities installed water filtration systems in 2012 on 40 homes in the Morris Mill area that were discovered to have high levels of trichloroethylene. Another 18 homes with lower but still elevated levels have been supplied bottled water. Officials say they don't know who dumped the solvent there, but believe it is not continuing.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
State and federal officials announced Friday they were providing $8 million to pipe clean public water to 270 homes near Salisbury where a toxic solvent has contaminated the ground water supplying residential wells there. Authorities installed water filtration systems in 2012 on 40 homes in the Morris Mill area that were discovered to have high levels of trichloroethylene. Another 18 homes with lower but still elevated levels have been supplied bottled water. Officials say they don't know who dumped the solvent there, but believe it is not continuing.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 15, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works' Water and Sewer Division will temporarily switch water sources at the Abingdon Water Treatment Plant from the usual supply originating at Loch Raven Reservoir to the Susquehanna River behind Conowingo Dam. The switch will occur during the evening of Monday, Nov. 18. DPW will start treating the Susquehanna water through the treatment plant on the morning of Tuesday, Nov. 19. Once the switch has...
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | April 17, 1991
For decades, residents of this small northwest Carroll community have relied on a private water system whose purity was assured by daily dumping -- by hand -- of chlorine.By the end of the year, the 58 homes that line a three-block section of country roads could be getting water the newfangled way -- and a sewer system to boot.The only catch, as more than 65 residents gathered in the social hall at the Pleasant Valley Volunteer Fire Co. learned Monday night, is a $2.2 million price tag."We're looking at grants to help yourcommunity afford the system," the county's assistant planning director, K. Marlene Conaway, told residents.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2001
The state is suggesting public water as a possible long-term solution for Pasadena residents who have radium in their well water - renewing the debate over whether connecting the peninsula to public water would bring unwanted development. In a letter to a member of Citizens Against Radium Poisoning, Jane T. Nishida, state secretary of the environment, wrote that the Maryland Department of the Environment is committed to working with the county to evaluate the costs and benefits of providing public water to the Pasadena peninsula.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Andrea F. Siegel and Katherine Richards and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writers | December 2, 1994
Eight Odenton families whose wells have been contaminated with weed killer will be hooked up to public water supplies at no charge, county officials said yesterday.The county will waive the $4,650 public water hookup fee for each family and will pay the plumbing costs of connecting the homes to the water main, said Lisa Ritter, a spokeswoman for the county land use office, yesterday.The county also will expedite the hookup process, which can take up to two months, and that could put the families on public water by the end of the year.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | July 20, 1993
Residents of rural west county areas whose wells are contaminated or threatened with contamination urged the Howard County Council last night to bring public water to their neighborhoods as soon as possible."
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Pasadena residents concerned about well water tainted with radium have launched a petition drive aimed at persuading the county to connect the eastern half of the Mountain Road peninsula to public water. The group, Citizens Against Radium Poisoning, said it has circulated the petition in the Sylvan View area and received about 75 percent of the community's support to extend public water from where it currently ends at Lake Shore Plaza. The 15-member group is offering to help other Pasadena residents start petitions.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | November 25, 2007
Education officials, staff and parents at a northern Harford elementary school coping with contaminated wells are asking for a connection to nearby public water lines. Trace amounts of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), a gasoline additive, were detected in the two private wells at Forest Hill Elementary School in 2005. By the spring of last year, tests showed the levels had risen to 13.6 parts per billion, a level still considered safe by federal standards, but one that prompted the school to use bottled water.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
The 7,000 households in Carroll County that receive public water from Liberty Reservoir are expected to see a slight increase in the water and sewer bills. The county is expected to adopt the new rates as part of its budget on Tuesday, May 28, said Roberta Windham, a county spokeswoman. New rates would take effect July 1. Carroll County buys water from the Baltimore Department of Public Works, which announced Monday it will seek a 15 percent increase for city water and sewer customers.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
Groundwater contamination from toxic waste dumped decades ago at a nearby factory in the Severn area has prompted widespread testing of residential wells and put eight homes on bottled water, state officials said. The eight households have been notified that they have unsafe levels of industrial solvents in their wells, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment, and two other homes have been found to have levels below those deemed to pose health risks. State officials said they are anxious to complete testing for the chemicals — including possible carcinogens — at dozens of other homes that had yet to respond to requests to check their wells.
EXPLORE
December 6, 2012
David Craig may not accomplish all the goals he has for his final two years as county executive, but if he finishes the term, he will have made county history as the longest serving county executive. Ever the historian, Craig, whose professional career in education began as a history teacher, pointed out around the time he was elected county executive for a second time that he had the potential to become the person to hold the job longer than anyone else to date. The reason is simple: Initially, he was appointed to fill out the term vacated by his predecessor Jim Harkins, who resigned midway through his second term to take a high-paying state job. Thus, Craig had about two years on the job before being elected in his own right to serve as county executive.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Commuters north of downtown will see major traffic disruptions Thursday, as Baltimore deals with another problem with its aging water infrastructure - this time the failure of a 90-year-old main that closed the intersection of North Charles Street and North Avenue. Public water rushed south along Charles Street all day Wednesday, buckling pavement, shuttering businesses and temporarily displacing residents in the Charles North neighborhood after a 60-inch transmission pipe broke at the East 20th Street intersection.
NEWS
By Ben Cardin and Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | July 30, 2012
This month, a critical link in the city's most essential public infrastructure hit a breaking point: A 120-year old water main burst, shutting down Light and Lombard streets, disrupting commutes and downtown businesses. Only 10 days later, a sink hole collapsed a portion of East Monument Street near Johns Hopkins Hospital when an underground storm-drain culvert failed. These two failures highlight the need to reinvest in our nation's water systems and to ensure vital support to a public service we cannot do without.
NEWS
July 19, 2012
Kevin Rector ("Break in Light St. water main disrupts downtown," July 17) presents jarring evidence of the pressing need facing our public water systems. In the last 35 years, federal investment in our most essential public service has all but dried up, threatening the sustainability of our aging infrastructure. This leaves our systems vulnerable to abuse by the water industry. Over the last several decades, local and state officials and ratepayers have shouldered a growing portion of support for public water systems.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
Carroll County's plan to construct a water line along Hollenberry and Obrecht roads in Sykesville has angered several residents who will have to abandon wells and pay the costs to hook into the public system. The water line will be built in conjunction with the $14 million treatment plant at Piney Run Reservoir, a project the county believes will alleviate persistent water shortages in South Carroll. When the water main is complete, county code requires that "every abutting property owner, after due notice, shall make a connection."
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 8, 2012
The Harford County public and municipal elected officials in Aberdeen, Bel Air and Havre de Grace need to pay particularly close attention three bills on water and sewer issues that are scheduled for hearings before the Harford County Council this Tuesday, March 13, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Though the bills to some degree reflect a move in the general direction of a unified water system for the county, the question whether the county needs such...
NEWS
August 1, 2011
From the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, Aug. 3, 1961: Water and sewerage was the big news in Harford County 50 years ago this week. The Aegis reported that Harford County received its master plan for providing public water and sewerage facilities from Whitman, Requardt and Associates in a study that cost $22,500 for a plan that was expected to cost an estimated $11.2 million for the first phase. It also projected the whole project would ultimately cost the county an estimated $37.5 million.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.