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NEWS
October 26, 1994
Stewart A. Kingsbury, 71, a linguist who documented the roots of Upper Peninsula dialect in New England, Canada, Finland and Italy, died Sunday in Marquette, Mich., after a lengthy illness. He was co-editor of the Dictionary of American Proverbs, published in 1992.Robert Lansing, 66, who starred on Broadway and in the TV series "12 O'Clock High," died Sunday of cancer in New York. On television, he played Brig. Gen. Frank Savage in "12 O'Clock High" and appeared in episodes of other series.
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NEWS
April 8, 2014
Eminent domain is one of those governmental attributes that has a fair amount in common with taxes. Both are inherent powers of any government, dating to the earliest days of government. Both can seem particularly onerous to the people who end up having to cede money or property to the government. And, like it or not, both are necessary to the functioning of government. Taxes are relatively easy to understand. If no one pays taxes, there is no government, which means everything from no national defense to no youth league athletic fields.
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BUSINESS
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 16, 1992
Q. Following your column's advice to always back up my hard disk proved to be a godsend. When my Macintosh's hard drive failed, I was able to restore all of my data from my backup disks. Personally experiencing this computing horror really made me think. Was there anything I could have done to prevent this from occurring in the first place?A. In many cases, hard disk malfunctions can be avoided by regular preventive maintenance. Two excellent disk maintenance programs are Norton Utilities for Macintosh Version 2.0, and Central Point's MacTools 2.0.Both offer a disk check-and-repair function.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
The state Public Utilities Commission will schedule a formal hearing on whether to make Uber Technologies, which lets Baltimore customers hail a town car by smart phone, abide by regulations that govern taxi companies. The app-driven startup company Uber entered the Baltimore market in January, raising the ire of local cab companies that said it was skirting state regulations. Century-old Yellow Cab filed a challenge with the commission, contending that Uber should not be allowed to operate here until it complies with the same safety and insurance regulations as traditional taxi and limo companies.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Long-distance telephone companies in Maryland would have the power to condemn private property under a bill that moved quietly through the Senate and received an equally quiet hearing before a House committee yesterday.The bill would allow these companies -- as long as they own their own wire in Maryland and are approved by the Public Service Commission -- to purchase private land even against the owner's wishes. C&P Telephone Co. and American Telephone & Telegraph currently have that right.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1999
The investigation into the emergency preparedness of the state's public utilities may be too hurried to yield many answers, the Maryland Office of People's Counsel said yesterday. In its response to the utilities' self-assessments, which were filed with the Maryland Public Service Commission last week, the OPC requested more time for data requests and evidentiary hearings. Public comment hearings are planned for Nov. 4 and Nov. 5 at the PSC offices in Baltimore. "The time constraints of this investigation make a thorough inquiry into the public utilities' emergency plans for restoring power to consumers impossible," the OPC filing said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
A zoning change granted late Friday will enable descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrolton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, to build hundreds of new homes on a portion of Doughoregan Manor, their Colonial-era Ellicott City estate, while preserving the rest of the 892-acre property. The Howard County Council is due to vote Thursday on the final element of the complex arrangement: a contract that lays out all the elements of the deal between Camilla and Philip D. Carroll and the county.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | May 14, 1993
The Westminster Planning Commission took the first step toward clearing the water at the Carroll County YMCA last night when it unanimously approved the association's request to hook up to the city water system.The YMCA has been plagued with bacteria in its water system since it opened its new Washington Road facility 11 months ago.Although the YMCA building is slightly outside the county master plan boundary for public utilities -- which stops at Carroll Community College -- city planners agreed to a "special exemption."
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. put his Republican stamp on the commission that regulates and sets rates for the state's public utilities yesterday, appointing a veteran of Annapolis' minority party as chairman of the Maryland Public Service Commission. Del. Kenneth D. Schisler, 33, an Eastern Shore Republican who is minority whip in the House of Delegates, will resign from elected office to take a five-year appointment to the $114,400-a-year post. As chairman of the five-member commission, he will run meetings and set the agenda for a regulatory body that is expected to preside over the continuing and thorny deregulation of the power and telecommunications industries.
BUSINESS
By Patrick Rossello | February 4, 1991
As a small company, your firm may find it impossible to compete for contracts awarded by government agencies or public utilities because they always require a surety bond. The Maryland Small Business Development Financing Authority can help you get the performance bonding insurance you need.MSBDFA, a part of the Maryland Department of Economic & Employment Development, has a number of programs to assist companies that are 70-percent owned by minorities or by "economically disadvantaged" persons.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Port officials have asked the state Public Utilities Commission to set a flat rate for taxi services to and from the cruise ship terminal and three popular city locations. James White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, said passengers — many from out of state — have complained "that they are being overcharged and that taxi drivers are not turning their meters on. " He asked the commission to set a fare for trips to Fort McHenry, Pennsylvania Station and the Inner Harbor in the same way it established a $30 flat rate for fares to Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
A zoning change granted late Friday will enable descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrolton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, to build hundreds of new homes on a portion of Doughoregan Manor, their Colonial-era Ellicott City estate, while preserving the rest of the 892-acre property. The Howard County Council is due to vote Thursday on the final element of the complex arrangement: a contract that lays out all the elements of the deal between Camilla and Philip D. Carroll and the county.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 17, 2007
The state's new Public Service Commission, under intense scrutiny from both politicians and the public, is expected to tackle multiple issues raised by last year's soaring electricity prices along with a host of other utility matters. Volatile energy prices and a national trend toward electricity deregulation have led to higher prices and consumer dissatisfaction, putting pressure on commissioners in Maryland and beyond to control costs. Last year, politicians - including then-Mayor Martin O'Malley - called for reforming the PSC and lawsuits were filed by and against its members.
NEWS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | June 12, 2006
State utility commissions, historically, have been sedate institutions. Regulators could often count on two things: anonymity and job security. But commissioners today are apt to find picketers outside their offices or homes, and their average tenure nationally is less than 3 1/2 years. In several states - including Maryland - where prices are rising as the effects of electricity deregulation take hold, consumer and political backlash is growing. Not since the upheaval in the nuclear power industry after the 1979 accident at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island froze nuclear plant construction and spurred higher rates have regulators faced such scorn.
NEWS
April 19, 2006
If you're hoping to get a break on the 72 percent electricity rate increase that was to go into effect this summer for Baltimore Gas and Electric customers, then you may have to be on your toes. That's because, according to recent reports, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and executives from BGE's parent, Constellation Energy Group, have been talking about limiting the first year's increase to 15 percent - but making that available on an opt-in basis. This is a lousy idea. Such opt-in programs are commonly employed by companies and industries that are forced to offer something to consumers - such as a do-not-call list - that they really don't want to offer.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2004
The Carroll County commissioners are considering adding $2,000 to the cost of a new home by increasing the fees charged for connecting to the public water and sewer systems. The proposal would increase the water fee $900 to $5,391 and the sewer fee more than $1,100 to $6,444. Buyers of single-family homes also pay an impact fee of $6,836 to offset the cost of services that new development demands. "This increase in fees is not outrageous compared to the increases in building materials," Commissioner Perry L. Jones Jr. said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 11, 1994
A rally in technology stocks and recovering bond prices lifted the stock market yesterday, despite strong hints from Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan that higher interest rates are on the way. The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 11.0 points, to 3,766.76, its third straight gain.Speaking of stocks, many readers have asked to see a recent quality ranking of electric utility stocks. In that connection we print today up-to-date data from Argus Research Corp., based on capitalization ratios, quality of earnings, capital spending plans and operating performance of each company.
NEWS
April 19, 2006
If you're hoping to get a break on the 72 percent electricity rate increase that was to go into effect this summer for Baltimore Gas and Electric customers, then you may have to be on your toes. That's because, according to recent reports, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and executives from BGE's parent, Constellation Energy Group, have been talking about limiting the first year's increase to 15 percent - but making that available on an opt-in basis. This is a lousy idea. Such opt-in programs are commonly employed by companies and industries that are forced to offer something to consumers - such as a do-not-call list - that they really don't want to offer.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. put his Republican stamp on the commission that regulates and sets rates for the state's public utilities yesterday, appointing a veteran of Annapolis' minority party as chairman of the Maryland Public Service Commission. Del. Kenneth D. Schisler, 33, an Eastern Shore Republican who is minority whip in the House of Delegates, will resign from elected office to take a five-year appointment to the $114,400-a-year post. As chairman of the five-member commission, he will run meetings and set the agenda for a regulatory body that is expected to preside over the continuing and thorny deregulation of the power and telecommunications industries.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1999
The investigation into the emergency preparedness of the state's public utilities may be too hurried to yield many answers, the Maryland Office of People's Counsel said yesterday. In its response to the utilities' self-assessments, which were filed with the Maryland Public Service Commission last week, the OPC requested more time for data requests and evidentiary hearings. Public comment hearings are planned for Nov. 4 and Nov. 5 at the PSC offices in Baltimore. "The time constraints of this investigation make a thorough inquiry into the public utilities' emergency plans for restoring power to consumers impossible," the OPC filing said.
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