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By Robert B. Reich | March 7, 2012
Rick Santorum called the president "a snob" for wanting everyone to get a college education. (In fact, President Barack Obama never actually called for universal college education but only for a year or more of training after high school.) Mr. Santorum needn't worry. America is already making it harder for young people of modest means to attend college. Public higher education is being starved, and the middle class will shrink even more as a result. Over the last year, 41 states have cut spending for public higher education.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
In the search for the next leader of the University System of Maryland, stakeholders are looking at a range of candidates, possibly a household name, a well-known CEO, a top government official - someone with star power. Someone like Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who has been profiled on "60 Minutes" and named among Time magazine's "Most Influential People in the World. " University officials approached Hrabowski early in the search, according to sources familiar with the process, though Hrabowski insists he is not interested in the job. As the search continues, a 10-member committee charged with finding the next chancellor is developing a list of candidates for review by the Board of Regents, which will make the final selection.
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NEWS
September 25, 1999
EVERYONE who loves college sports applauds the opportunity afforded athletes who get scholarships to big time programs. Competition, travel and the challenges of university life in the NCAA's Division I surely broaden and educate. The joy of victory and the agony of defeat are lessons for life.The growth of international basketball leagues -- with many more jobs for players -- represent another reason to nurture hoop dreams.But the name of the game is still education -- and not just because the athlete will need another source of income some day. The nation's colleges and universities need to be held accountable for the bargains they make -- and too often break.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
The University of Maryland University College, which has been struggling with declining enrollment, is considering severing some ties with the state university system to avoid burdensome regulations and work more closely with the private sector. Under the proposal, the university would become an independent nonprofit organization that retains an affiliation with the state system. The school's president, Javier Miyares, said during a Thursday town hall meeting in Largo that the idea came from a task force of experts organized by the university as a response to a shrinking student body.
NEWS
February 8, 1999
REP. THOMAS M. Davis III of Virginia first floated the idea of charging Washington, D.C. college students in-state tuition at Maryland and Virginia public colleges last month.The idea is a good one. So good, in fact, that before the Republican congressman could fine-tune his proposal, President Clinton included it in his budget request to Congress last week.Never mind that the $17 million the president requested was $10 million more than Mr. Davis had envisioned in the program's first year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 2003
The moment registration opens, Michele D. Hannah dives for courses with the fury of a fifth-year college student vexed by a constant riddle. "When will I get the classes I need to graduate?" said Hannah, Class of "I have no idea" at the University of Iowa. Classes have gotten so tight, or so scarce, that Hannah says she trolls the university's Web site like a day-trader, checking every few hours for the stray course opening that might suddenly appear. But it probably will not. Many public universities - after whittling away at staff, coaxing faculty members to juggle more classes, stripping sports teams and trusting aging roofs to hold out a few years longer - have reluctantly begun chopping away at academics, making it harder for students to graduate on schedule.
NEWS
By Stuart Silverstein and Stuart Silverstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2002
Many public colleges and universities around the country are caught in financial crunches, prompting midyear tuition increases and belt-tightening measures such as enrollment limits and faculty cuts. The financial problems stem from strains on state budgets because of the slow economy over the past year and a bulge in the number of youths reaching college age. "This is the first time in the modern history of higher education that we've had enrollment pressure and a bad economy at the same time," said Patrick M. Callan, president of the nonprofit National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education in San Jose, Calif.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2002
The University of Maryland, College Park received further validation yesterday of its growing national reputation as it jumped into the top 20 of U.S. News & World Report's ranking of public universities. The university moved from 21st to 18th among public universities, tied with the University of Georgia and one notch behind the University of Florida. It moved ahead of Texas A&M University, the University of Minnesota, Purdue University and Ohio State University. The rise can be attributed in large part to an increase in the key measurement of "peer assessment," the reputation of its academic programs among presidents and college admissions officials at other universities.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
William E. Kirwan, who as chancellor of the University System of Maryland over the past dozen years helped oversee the rise of several of the state's public universities to national prominence, will step down from his position as soon as a successor is found, he said Tuesday. Kirwan, 76, a gregarious leader who maintained good relations with state officials, university presidents, members of the Board of Regents, faculty, business leaders and students, said he hopes to remain active in higher education with work on expanding access for low-income students.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
The University of Maryland University College, which has been struggling with declining enrollment, is considering severing some ties with the state university system to avoid burdensome regulations and work more closely with the private sector. Under the proposal, the university would become an independent nonprofit organization that retains an affiliation with the state system. The school's president, Javier Miyares, said during a Thursday town hall meeting in Largo that the idea came from a task force of experts organized by the university as a response to a shrinking student body.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
William E. Kirwan, who as chancellor of the University System of Maryland over the past dozen years helped oversee the rise of several of the state's public universities to national prominence, will step down from his position as soon as a successor is found, he said Tuesday. Kirwan, 76, a gregarious leader who maintained good relations with state officials, university presidents, members of the Board of Regents, faculty, business leaders and students, said he hopes to remain active in higher education with work on expanding access for low-income students.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
I appreciated Dan Rodricks recent column about American "exceptionalism" ( "Expecting the horrible is the American way," Jan. 25). Some years ago when I conducted student travel-study semesters in various European countries with, among other things, well-functioning transportation systems, my students had no problem recognizing that some things were indeed better in Europe. After our return I asked them about this, and their answer was: "The U.S. is still the best country.
NEWS
By Jay Bernstein | January 2, 2014
Over 200 years ago, political theorist and philosopher Edmund Burke memorably remarked: "The only thing necessary for evil to flourish is for good men to do nothing. " This truism comes to mind when assessing the reaction of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to the recent vote by the American Studies Association (ASA) in favor of an academic boycott of Israel. The ASA, of which UMBC is an institutional member, is the nation's oldest and largest association dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of American history and culture.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 21, 2013
Congress is in recess, but you'd hardly know it. This has been the most do-nothing, gridlocked Congress in decades. But the recess at least offers a pause in the ongoing partisan fighting that's sure to resume in a few weeks. It also offers an opportunity to step back and ask ourselves what's really at stake. A society -- any society -- is defined as a set of mutual benefits and duties embodied most visibly in public institutions: public schools, public libraries, public transportation, public hospitals, public parks, public museums, public recreation, public universities, and so on. Public institutions are supported by all taxpayers and are available to all. If the tax system is progressive, those who are better off (and who, presumably, have benefited from many of these same public institutions)
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2013
Four presidents at public research universities made a collective $9.2 million in fiscal year 2012, with the top earner of the group making much of his money because he was fired, according to a report released Sunday by the Chronicle of Higher Education. Graham B. Spanier, who was terminated from Pennsylvania State University in late 2011 for his handling of a child-molestation scandal, was paid $2.9 million - $1.2 million of it in severance. This was the first fiscal year that four presidents topped the million mark in compensation.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
By dumping $300,000 in taxpayer funds on Towson University's baseball team, Gov. Martin O'Malley has temporarily solved one problem and created a multitude of others. The frustration that led Mr. O'Malley to intervene is understandable. But his proposal to use a supplemental appropriation to buy the team two more years sets a dangerous precedent while failing to address any of the problems in Towson's athletics department that got the university into the unwelcome position of cutting two men's sports in the first place.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
As high school seniors across the country spend this month choosing where to enroll next fall, Maryland's top two public research universities are enjoying an applicant pool that is deeper and more talented than ever. Applications at the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County were up again this year, and the two state universities also report increased grade point averages and SAT scores among the thousands of students who were mailed thick letters this spring offering admission.
NEWS
June 30, 1992
For its first dive in the fund-raising pool, the University of Maryland System executed a fairly impressive full-gainer: UMS has reached a $200 million goal it had set for its five-year campaign 1 1/2 years ahead of schedule. The campaign, begun in 1988, isn't to run out until the end of 1993, so officials have revised the goal to a level they initially rejected as unrealistic: $236 million."It can no longer be said that Maryland's public universities do not enjoy private support," said Allen J. Krowe, a senior vice president and chief financial officer of Texaco Inc., who chairs the campaign.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2013
A Morgan State University alumnus who is leading a coalition suing the state over discrimination at historically black colleges and universities has criticized the university's embattled president for showing "minimal interest and involvement in the lawsuit. " David J. Burton, president of the Coalition for Equity and Excellence in Maryland Higher Education, wrote in a letter to Dallas R. Evans, chair of Morgan's Board of Regents, saying university president David J. Wilson's actions could "be interpreted as his being against rather than in support of the Coalition's case.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
When some University of Maryland, College Park students return to class for the spring semester, they could be attending lectures, taking quizzes and completing group projects without leaving their dorm rooms. The university is participating in a pilot program that combines massive open online courses with traditional classroom instruction. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently awarded $1.4 million to nonprofit research group Ithaka S+R to study how the state's university system could incorporate the increasingly popular online courses "There are two things we're seeking: new strategies that will improve learning outcomes and lower costs," said University System of Maryland Chancellor William E. Kirwan.
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