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NEWS
April 6, 1992
It's bad enough that right-wing critics of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in the U.S. Senate are holding up the agency's funding to protest alleged "liberal bias." Now state lawmakers are jumping on the bandwagon to bash public television. Why, they ask, should strapped state governments fund public television when cable now offers the diversity of viewpoints public television was originally intended to foster?It's a specious argument but one that resonates in Maryland, where the state Senate recently cut $1 million from Maryland Public Television's budget before 70 percent of the money was restored in a compromise with the House.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
The most important TV moment of 2013 didn't even happen on television. It came on Feb. 1 when Netflix made all 13 episodes of season one of “House of Cards” available online for its subscribers. Social media and the Internet lit up the next two weeks with personal accounts of subscribers “binge-viewing” the Baltimore-made political thriller starring Kevin Spacey - fans streaming one episode after another until they had their fill. Given that binge-viewing had been going on for years with DVDs, and that media habits started more than a half-century ago don't end overnight, it would probably be an overstatement to call 2013 the year appointment television died.
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FEATURES
By Marc Gunther and Marc Gunther,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 22, 1995
For public television, selling ads would be selling out.That, at least, was the consensus of about 200 public TV executives who met in Washington this week to ponder an uncertain future and to lobby Congress for money.Some Republicans on Capitol Hill have urged public television stations to sell advertising, to make up for an expected loss in federal support.But, while stations are willing to ease some restrictions on corporate underwriting, PBS President Ervin Duggan said the idea of selling full-fledged commercials is opposed by PBS and most stations.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
For an agricultural operation that is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, Maple Lawn Turkey Farm is adept at blending the old and the new. Tried-and-true methods still prevail at Maple Lawn. But the Fulton farm also embraces modern concepts, such as raising free-range birds and using large arrays of solar panels to generate enough electricity to offset what it consumes each year. And just in time for Thanksgiving, the turkey farm's success story will unfold on the airwaves Tuesday in the debut of a new half-hour TV series featuring farms across the state.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | April 23, 1992
Washington -- Is nothing sacred? Evidently not. Even public television is being questioned by some conservatives who evidently do not understand the importance of being earnest.Some troglodyte Neanderthal Puritan Yahoo philistine reactionary inquisitorial Victorian barbarian blue-nosed Cromwellian know-nothing Savonarolas -- that is, conservatives, as the public television lobby sees them -- are wondering why taxpayers should give another $1.1 billion to public television.A good question.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | January 19, 1995
An article in yesterday's Today section about federal financing for public broadcasting incorrectly reported the amount the government spends on military bands. That amount is $175 million.The Sun regrets the error.And, a graphic in yesterday's Today section about the funding of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting incorrectly reported the amount of money spent on administrative expenses. CPB spends $13 million, or 4.6 percent of its budget, in that area.* The Sun regrets the error.The debate in Washington over whether Congress should cut federal support for public radio and television is founded on sound economics, harsh ideology, undisguised partisanship, or concern for public education -- depending on who's talking.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
Calling supporters of public television a "small group of elitists," Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich yesterday charged the Public Broadcast System with using taxpayers' money to lobby for donations, and he renewed his vow to cut federal support of public TV and radio."
FEATURES
By Marc Gunther and Marc Gunther,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 13, 1995
Washington -- Newt Gingrich's opposition may be the most visible threat to PBS, but it's far from the only one.With Congress on the verge of cutting its subsidy, public television is struggling to raise more money from corporations and viewers.But it faces many obstacles: it is bureaucratic and inefficient, requiring the upkeep of 350 stations, compared with 200 for the commercial networks, and its leadership is splintered and politicized.One sign of the troubled times: Ervin Duggan, the president of the Public Broadcasting Service, was so fearful of conservative critics that he wanted to take a four-hour series about the FBI off the air last month until he was talked out of it by his staff, PBS sources say. They fear that such a willingness to bend with the political winds potentially compromises the independence of PBS.Mr.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | June 24, 1992
Public television, frank depictions of homosexuality, NEA funding and protest from conservatives. It's a recipe for controversy, and it's back on the front burner as PBS presents the "Lost Language of Cranes" at 10 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67).Donald E. Wildmon's American Family Association is urging congressmen and taxpayers to watch the film about a father and son both coming to terms with their homosexuality to see how "PBS uses some of its tax funds to promote the homosexual lifestyle."
NEWS
October 4, 1996
DAVID H. NEVINS, chairman of the board that oversees Maryland Public Television, predicted last week that theimminent naming of a new president for the station would be regarded as a coup.Indeed, Robert J. Shuman, the man chosen after a year-long search, has a long list of credentials: He developed satellite programming to reach children in the Appalachians and the Rocky Mountains in the pre-Internet 1970s. He co-founded cable TV's The Learning Channel in the '80s. And in the '90s, he has headed a Washington, D.C., company that trains community leaders via televised courses.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
When Maryland Public Television debuts "The Heart of the Civil War" on Sept. 11, it will showcase many Carroll County sites. The hour-long documentary features areas like Westminster and Uniontown and battlefields that were critical to both sides in the war between the states. The film includes footage of the most crucial territories where Confederate and Union forces battled for strategic advantage in Carroll, Frederick and Washington counties. The story focuses on Maryland residents enmeshed in the famous battles, whose sites still draw hundreds of tourists annually.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Maryland Public Television said Wednesday that Steven J. Schupak, its senior vice president, has been named chief content officer. Schupak, who joined MPT in 2003, oversees the development, production, licensing and national distribution of the station's programs, among other responsibilities. Schupak is responsible for the station's local productions, including "Outdoors Maryland" and "State Circle. " During his tenure, MPT has earned 26 Emmy Awards and other industry honors for its productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
For the last two weeks, I have done everything I could to get people to watch "The Learning," an illuminating documentary about the lives of four Filipina teachers who are recruited to teach in Baltimore City Schools. I have blogged, and here's a link to that. I have gone on WYPR radio to talk about it, and here's a link to that. I am upset that Maryland Public Television is airing at 10:30 tonight (Sept. 25) on its digital channel 22.2 only. It debuted Tuesday night on public televisions  stations nationwide.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
With regard to the piece on state-run public TV, David Zurawik gets to the heart of the matter when he says, "the community-based formula, as practiced at WETA in Washington, is vastly superior in terms of guaranteeing editorial independence and community access. " ("Chris Christie's take on state-run public TV outlets — like MPT," July 5.) While Gov. Martin O'Malley may be completely blameless, the door is wide open for the abuse of power by less-then-honorable officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
Don't let your feelings one way or the other about New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie stop you from thinking dispassionately about what he has to say about the perils of state-run public television systems like the one we have in Maryland. Christie, a conservative, has been trying to get his state out of the public television business in an effort to cut ballooning state government costs. Maryland has most or all of the same kinds of money problems. And like New Jersey, Maryland is one of the states where the state, not a non-profit citizens group, holds the license, provides funds and controls content on the statewide public television operation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
With the state of Maryland looking hard for budget cuts, and Maryland Public Television looking for new leadership as it loses audience, membership and funding, the time seems right to seriously consider whether Annapolis should be in the television business. It might seem like an unconventional idea. But if Maryland can't do better than it has in recent years, it should sell the license or lease operational control of MPT to a local nonprofit group. That is not as bold and unprecedented a move as it might seem; New Jersey is trying to do just that with NJN, its public broadcasting operation.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 28, 1995
The demise of Raymond K. K. Ho, who was fired this week as president of Maryland Public Television, leaves behind two important questions.If Ho was, as some of his colleagues nationally describe him, a visionary whose innovative leadership made MPT a model for stations around the country, why did his nine-year tenure here come to such an ugly end?And, more important, are Ho's bosses right when they say it is time for MPT to rely less on government money and more on contributions from viewers, foundations and businesses -- a move Ho feared would drive public TV into the hands of commercial interests?
NEWS
November 23, 1996
RARELY HAS a hypothetical million dollars, a cartoon mascot and a TV-star dog caused so much anxiety. The fact that they recently did speaks volumes about public television and the trust it has cultivated over the years among millions of viewers.The issue was raised by a newspaper article that suggested Frito-Lay Co., the snack food producer with a plant in Maryland, was offering $1 million to the Public Broadcasting Service if it would allow a promotional spot with "Chester Cheetah," the hip mascot for its "Chee-tos" cheese curls.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Joyce L. Green, an educational television specialist and a former Maryland Public Television producer, died Dec. 6 of complications from multiple sclerosis at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 63. Ms. Green was born in Baltimore - the youngest of five sisters - and raised on Beaumont Avenue in Govans. After graduating from St. Mary's parochial school in 1960, she attended Mercy High School and was a member of the school's first graduating class in 1964.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen , fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Joyce L. Green, an educational television specialist and a former Maryland Public Television producer, died Dec. 6 of complications from multiple sclerosis at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 63. Ms. Green was born in Baltimore - the youngest of five sisters - and raised on Beaumont Avenue in Govans. After graduating from St. Mary's parochial school in 1960, she attended Mercy High School and was a member of the school's first graduating class in 1964.
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