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NEWS
May 7, 2012
I applaud Sen. Ben Cardin's efforts to end racial profiling: Nothing is more divisive than to bring an "us against them" mentality into law enforcement ("Candidates make final push before Tuesday," April 2). What could be more demoralizing and dehumanizing than being judged by the color of your skin or the clothes you wear? Racial profiling, by definition, is incompatible with the guarantee of equal protection under the law contained in the 14th Amendment of the Constitution. Yet, many of the same people who claim to be strict constructionists with regard to the Constitution are in favor of denigrating one of its most basic tenets.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014
We add our voices to the outrage expressed by our fellow citizens concerning the nomination process to replace Baltimore City Councilman William Cole ( "District 11 do-over?" Oct. 2). With all due respect, that process can only be described as a complete farce. We urge the council to reject Eric Costello's nomination to fill the seat and send the nominating committee back to begin anew. In addition, the nominating committee should be directed to give full and fair consideration to all those who applied for the position and to take into consideration the letters in support of as well as in opposition to each of the candidates.
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BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 6, 1999
James W. Brinkley, president and chief operating officer of Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc., was elected chairman of the Securities Industry Association yesterday at the trade group's annual convention in Boca Raton, Fla.Brinkley succeeds Roy J. Zuckerberger, advisory director of New York-based Goldman Sachs & Co.In an address to the Washington-based trade group's members, Brinkley said the industry must focus on several issues, including promoting public trust...
NEWS
By Susan Ariel Aaronson and Michael Owen Moore | December 17, 2013
Leaks are bedeviling trade negotiations. In October, the European Commission leaked its position papers for the US-EU free trade agreement talks, known as the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership Agreement or T-TIP. In November, Wikileaks leaked a draft of the intellectual property chapter of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade agreement among 12 countries bordering the Pacific Ocean. The same group also leaked a draft outlining country positions on key negotiating chapters in the TPP in early December.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 1992
With one of New Jersey's state colleges named for his family, it is only natural that former Gov. Thomas H. Kean, now the president of Drew University, should be more sensitive than most university officials to the public's image of higher education.Mr. Kean recently addressed 400 educators in Philadelphia and leveled with them about how colleges and universities, including Kean College of New Jersey, are now perceived by the public."Here is the reality, plain and simple," he told his audience.
NEWS
February 15, 2000
THE cost of justice is extremely high," lamented State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes, who faces the likely prospect of as many as 100 pending drug cases being tossed out of court. He has dismissed a half-dozen pending cases last week. They are among the cases under investigation by the state attorney general because a Westminster police detective is accused of planting drugs on suspects. The officer's alleged actions have tainted any number of drug charges made by Westminster police over the past year or so. Even charges that might be proven without the officer's direct involvement are in jeopardy.
NEWS
March 28, 1996
COMPTROLLER Joan M. Pratt needs to dump her very personal friend, Julius Henson, as a well-paid aide in her office if she is to have any hope of regaining the public trust that she has so perversely forfeited. Until she does, Ms. Pratt's usefulness as a public servant and her future as an aspiring politician will be moot.Baltimore citizens depend on the comptroller to tell the City Council or mayor or anyone who thinks he can buy influence at City Hall where to get off when it comes to spending the public's dollar.
NEWS
June 7, 1996
EVEN THE people who opposed the passage of Question B in Howard County 19 months ago -- and we were among them -- can see the logic in the straw vote the County Council took this week not to weaken the law.Question B might have made a bad law, but "big brother" government would be a worse "B." Had the council voted to weaken this law after voters created it by referendum, the county might have won the battle but lost the war in terms of public trust.Question B was a very emotional issue. It allowed citizens the right to challenge county land-use decisions of the zoning board through referendum.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | August 7, 2002
Some clerics admonish their congregants: Hate the sin, love the sinner. So what's the media corollary: Mistrust the news, love the anchor? A study released this week by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press found that levels of public trust toward the media have largely dipped to the uneasy levels found before last September's terrorist attacks. After the attacks, public faith in the media rose with admiration for government officials, religious institutions and other major parts of the establishment.
NEWS
April 3, 1996
THE ANNE ARUNDEL County Police Department, which has been relatively free of controversy in recent months, had a bad week last week.Within two days, two officers had been charged with crimes, both betrayals of public trust, one an example of mind-numbing stupidity. One officer is accused of sexually assaulting women; the other of shoplifting 10 packs of baseball cards from a Glen Burnie Wal-Mart while in uniform. Like any police wrongdoing, these incidents damage the department's reputation, each in its own way.In terms of seriousness, of course, the two allegations do not compare.
NEWS
October 9, 2013
I find Michael Gisriel's announced bid for one of the District 12 delegate's seats offensive. Given the fine representatives who have served our District over the years, it is insulting to our previous delegates and voters that a disbarred attorney, one with a failed term as an unsuccessful Maryland delegate in the late 1980s and an avowed special interest lobbyist to boot, would have the gall to say he's going to represent the people of District 12....
NEWS
July 10, 2013
I have been following the actions of the Baltimore County government and the sale of county-owned property with great interest and concern. In all of my years on the County Council and in the House of Delegates, I have never seen such actions as these, perpetrated against county residents in such a cavalier and reckless manner. Across Baltimore County, residents are upset and angry at the government for one very important reason: They have been kept out of the line of communication and not been allowed any public input in decisions that affect them directly.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 8, 2013
Every time I drive between Baltimore and Washington and come upon those big, spooky National Security Agency buildings in Fort Meade, I have cinematic thoughts about what goes on inside. I imagine the best and brightest of surveillance nerds spying on nuclear activity in Iran, on terrorist training camps in Yemen, on Kim Jong-un's playroom in North Korea. I also assume they're watching me as I drive along Route 32, taking my picture and running it through face-recognition software, recording the license plate on my car. If there's a cellphone in use, they're probably listening to the conversation, too. But wait.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
The Baltimore Police Department's internal affairs chief is leaving the agency, a little more than a year after being brought on to reassure the public that a scandal-weary agency would get tougher policing itself, a spokesman confirmed. Grayling Williams, who joined the department last January from the Department of Homeland Security's counter narcotics office, resigned Thursday to pursue another opportunity, chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. Williams referred a reporter's questions to the spokesman.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
When Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff was stopped for drunken driving in a country vehicle at 2:30 a.m. Feb. 23 he indigently asked the police officer: "Don't you know who I am?" ("Council member faces DUI charge," Feb. 24). Taxpayers are asking: "Who do you think you are, Mr. Huff?" This is not his first brush with the law, but it should be his last as an elected official. It is time for him to resign. Public office is a public trust, and abusing it is inexcusable. If Mr. Huff hasn't figured that out, he should call his fellow Republican John Leopold in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Baltimore police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday the creation of a new unit to oversee internal affairs, audits and the writing of police procedures, a move he hopes will strengthen public confidence in his agency. Jeronimo "Jerry" Rodriguez, a 26-year Los Angeles Police Department veteran, was named deputy commissioner in charge of the new Bureau of Professional Standards. Rodriguez will report directly to Batts and joins Deputy Commissioner John Skinner at the top level of Batts' staff.
NEWS
By Susan Ariel Aaronson and Michael Owen Moore | December 17, 2013
Leaks are bedeviling trade negotiations. In October, the European Commission leaked its position papers for the US-EU free trade agreement talks, known as the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership Agreement or T-TIP. In November, Wikileaks leaked a draft of the intellectual property chapter of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade agreement among 12 countries bordering the Pacific Ocean. The same group also leaked a draft outlining country positions on key negotiating chapters in the TPP in early December.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
The Baltimore Police Department's internal affairs chief is leaving the agency, a little more than a year after being brought on to reassure the public that a scandal-weary agency would get tougher policing itself, a spokesman confirmed. Grayling Williams, who joined the department last January from the Department of Homeland Security's counter narcotics office, resigned Thursday to pursue another opportunity, chief spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. Williams referred a reporter's questions to the spokesman.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
Your series of articles on the speed camera fiasco prompts me to make the following comments. Since I started teaching political science in 1964 with my first assignment at Ridgely Junior High School, I have developed a good idea of what constitutes good or bad behavior on the part of our politicians. Thus, on Jan. 6, I filed a formal complaint with the Baltimore City Board of Ethics concerning the behavior of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake with regard to the speed camera mess. I stated in my complaint that Mayor Rawlings-Blake violated the sacred public trust by approving a speed camera program which allowed the Department of Transportation to issue tickets to citizens with the understanding that the company, Xerox State and Local Solutions, would receive a portion of every $40 ticket issued.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
The replacement of all of Baltimore's speed cameras and the police department's decision to beef up the review process for the tickets they generate are welcome signs that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration is taking seriously the need to correct problems with the system. Those steps hold the promise of eliminating many of the technical and human errors that have led to some motorists getting tickets they clearly did not deserve. But they do not eliminate the need for the General Assembly to enact reforms to the state's speed camera law to correct other flaws in how they are used in the city and other jurisdictions.
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