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NEWS
April 16, 2011
In his commentary in the Baltimore Sun ("End the MTA Monopoly," April 14), Professor James Dorn of Towson University, and the Cato Foundation whose journal he edits, would have us privatize our public transportation. Dorn characterizes the Maryland Transit Administration (MTA) as a monopoly, without mentioning the scores of private transportation providers (vans, shuttles, taxis, etc.), including the massive French multinational corporation Veolia, which already co-exist with the MTA right here in the Baltimore region.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 7, 2014
So, first question: If you could travel to the nation's capital from Baltimore in 15 minutes by super-fast train, would you? Sure you would. You'd give it a try at least once, if only to brag that you had achieved land speed of 300 mph. It would be a bucket list kind of thing. But would you go to the District of Columbia more often if you could get there in 15 minutes? I mean, really: Would having a high-speed train between Baltimore and Washington make you more interested in things D.C. - the Hirshhorn, the Nationals, protests in Lafayette Square, decriminalized pot?
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NEWS
June 25, 2010
I agree with the O'Malley campaign that Robert L. Flanagan was a terrible secretary of transportation for anyone who relies on public transit ("MARC debate grows heated," June 25). He not only actively ridiculed transit activists like myself but distinguished himself by seemingly not knowing where the light rail or subway went or when it was built. He wrote to this newspaper complaining that the extensions to Hunt Valley and BWI were unfunded projects that the Ehrlich administration was forced to comply with, when in fact the extensions were finished long before 2002 during the Glendening administration.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
I heartily agree with Eileen Pollock when she says that she can't overstate how pleasant Baltimoreans are ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan.14). I moved to Baltimore from out of state seven years ago and have been struck by the friendliness and helpfulness of everyone. Ms. Pollock then proceeds to make some generalizations about daily life in Baltimore, unsupported by evidence, and seems to contradict her initial description of the city as a relaxed, friendly place. She says Baltimore is totally car dependent while New York is easy to navigate on public transportation.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Sun Staff | September 12, 2001
Worried about further terrorist attacks, federal officials shut down the nation's entire air transportation system yesterday, ordering thousands of airplanes out of the skies and prohibiting takeoffs at airports nationwide. The unprecedented "ground stop" cleared the nation's skies of civilian aircraft for the first time in history, and poured thousands of stranded travelers onto an already clogged network of highways and rail lines. But passenger rail and bus services shut down as well, virtually freezing public transportation in the Northeast.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | August 22, 1993
Would you ride the bus in Carroll?The county commissioners want to know.The county will begin distributing surveys this week asking if residents would consider using a public bus to get to work, shops, the doctor, school or other places."
NEWS
July 8, 2000
STATE AND REGIONAL planners are finally giving us reason to believe they can find ways to operate a well-coordinated public transportation network. Breaking through jurisdictional barriers to provide reliable transit service in the Baltimore area sometimes seems like a climb up Mount Everest. But the Mass Transit Administration is working with regional and local bus companies to provide interconnected service to a major destination coming this fall -- the Arundel Mills mall. If planners succeed, many of the estimated 3,000 employees, as well as shoppers, will be able to reach the mall's stores, shops and 24-screen movie theater by reliable public transit.
NEWS
April 30, 2002
Maryland Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari recently spoke with Richard C. Gross, editor of the Opinion Commentary page, at the offices of The Sun about transportation issues affecting the Baltimore area. Q: How do you improve the interaction of different types of public transportation in the Baltimore area to attract more passengers? A: First you make it physically easier to get between the systems. In some cases, that may be sidewalks, elevators or escalators. You also make it easier for our traveling public to understand how to use this system.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
D espite some modest help from the federal stimulus plan, times are tough for public transportation. Across the country, agencies are seeing ridership and government funding drop even as they reduce services and raise fares to keep their budgets balanced. Some of this is necessary to deal with the inevitable hardships of recession. No public service is immune from economic realities. Running mostly empty buses on little-patronized routes or expecting taxpayers to fully bear the operating costs of transit in Baltimore or anywhere else is not possible politically and probably not smart economically.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
Despite some modest help from the federal stimulus plan, times are tough for public transportation. Across the country, agencies are seeing ridership and government funding drop even as they reduce services and raise fares to keep their budgets balanced. Some of this is necessary to deal with the inevitable hardships of recession. No public service is immune from economic realities. Running mostly empty buses on little-patronized routes or expecting taxpayers to fully bear the operating costs of transit in Baltimore or anywhere else is not possible politically and probably not smart economically.
NEWS
March 27, 2013
Opponents of the effort to raise Maryland's gas tax have thrown around a lot of ridiculous claims in recent weeks, from the argument that the money isn't really needed (if anything, the projected $600 million-a-year return is not enough to meet Maryland's future transportation needs) to hand-wringing over local transportation aid that was diverted toward balancing the state budget during the depths of the recession - as if using the money to spare cuts to schools or avoid tax increases wasn't preferable to pot hole repairs.
NEWS
Staff Reports | March 17, 2013
David Johnson of Fells Point said he and his wife were awakened early on Sunday morning at about 2 a.m. to the sound of revelers' voices in front of their residence. He said his wife asked the group if they could quiet down. When the couple awoke this morning, they found two large planters at the front stoop smashed, the soil spilling onto the sidewalk. "I guess their response was to smash our planters," said Johnson, who said he reported the incident to Baltimore City police.
NEWS
September 22, 2012
The controversy over a proposed parking lot in Baltimore City's Patterson Park shows once again that there is something profoundly wrong with our collective dependency on cars ("Residents irate at proposal to pave over green," Sept. 19). The alleged need for additional parking is a consequence of past decisions to destroy a viable public transportation system. While that decision was made long ago, we are doing little to change its continuing legacy. Building more parking capacity only sustains the problem, in addition to the environmental damage it will bring about.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
Letter writer Mahlon G. Anderson of AAA Mid-Atlantic ("Md. should devote its surplus to transportation," Sept. 6) gives short shrift to an essential need here in Maryland - improved public transportation. He focuses on road construction and motorists. Another effective way to for Maryland "to tackle its own Beltway gridlock" is to develop the public transportation alternative to automobile commuting both in the Baltimore and the National Capital regions. In fact, the Nov. 1, 2011 Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Maryland Transportation Funding, of which Mr. Anderson was a member, refers to "capital needs to address doubling transit ridership goal" as an historic and important use of additional funds to the Transportation Trust Fund.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
Runs through Tuesday at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, Fort McHenry, Martin State Airport and other locations . Inner Harbor activities Star-Spangled Sailabration Villages will feature live entertainment, traditional festival fare and hands-on fun for kids. Ships, docked throughout the harbor area, will be open for tours. Transportation Officials urge visitors to use public transportation, because parking will be limited. Options include the Water Taxi, MTA's MARC, the light rail and buses, Amtrak and the Charm City Circulator's free Banner Route, which travels from the Baltimore Visitor Center to Fort McHenry every 10 minutes.
NEWS
May 21, 2012
Do I understand this correctly? We, the people of Maryland, paid for hotels and meals for our representatives in Annapolis because they failed to do the job of passing a reasonable budget and had to meet in special sessions to prevent fiscal "Doomsday. " So, we reward them by treating them to hotel stays and the cost of meals and libation throughout the duration? Don't they all live in our state? Why couldn't they just drive their cars or take public transportation? Most other job holders do commute to and from work, and many bring their own lunches.
NEWS
February 4, 2012
Reporting on the tax increases proposed by Gov.Martin O'Malleyoften fail to mention one important fact. When the gas tax goes up, so does the cost to operate the public transportation system. Why do taxpayers get double-taxed by supporting the cost of public transportation in addition to their cost to maintain a vehicle? Car owners pay for insurance, vehicle emission fees, repairs and license fees and now most likely an increased tax on gasoline. Public transportation users pay none of these fees.
NEWS
By Gregory Spencer Jr | February 1, 2012
The corner of Howard and Lombard streets has the potential to be the pulse point of a healthier city and region. This is where the proposed Red Line and the existing Light Rail line will directly connect, addressing two long-standing deficiencies with mass transit in this city: the lack of an east/west rapid transit line and the absence of a direct transfer between rail lines to create a true "system. " Baltimore and Maryland should consider taking this transfer point one step further.
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