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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
A vision for the "greening" of downtown Baltimore is taking shape after city leaders proposed ambitious steps to keep and attract businesses and residents by making public areas more inviting. An open-space plan unveiled last February by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore calls for a network of spaces that link neighborhoods to the downtown by offering "visual cues," pleasant streetscapes and activities to propel pedestrians from one block to the next. The plan, the first of its kind for the downtown, envisions new or enhanced parks and plazas, as well as livelier streetscapes and public spaces that feature regular activities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Five community art projects, including a sculptural weather station featuring a giant pig, a children's garden full of upward-growing, kinetic "sculptures" and Baltimore's tallest mural, will begin transforming some of Baltimore's underused public spaces later this year. The Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts has announced the winners of the annual Transformative Arts Prize. This year, PNC Bank will donate more than $100,000 to enable artists working with neighborhood residents to permanently reinvent vacant lots, parks and streetscapes.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | April 16, 2013
Less than 24 hours ago, an apparent act of terrorism marred this year's Boston Marathon. It's too early to know many of the details about this tragic event. Late last night, officials were reporting three deaths and well over 100 injuries; soon we will have a clearer sense of how many were killed and wounded. Their families, friends and co-workers will pay tribute to and then bury their loved ones. When they are ready, some of the wounded survivors and spectators will come forward to recount the horrors they experienced.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 1, 2014
One of my earliest childhood memories is going door-to-door at the Kendale Apartments on Maiden Choice Lane in Arbutus with Mom. The purpose of the exercise was not to solicit contributions on behalf of a political candidate, however. Rather, Mom and a group of like-minded volunteers were organizing in opposition to a woman by the name of Madalyn Murray O'Hair - she of the [un]holy crusade to ban prayer from public schools. Given my tender years, little did I realize that the Ehrlichs were fully engaged in a culture war that continues to burn brightly five decades later.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | October 7, 2007
If Baltimore wants to get more people to live and work downtown, it needs a greater variety of stores, better restaurants, more to see and do in general. It also needs more attractive public spaces - not just passageways between office towers, but inviting parks and plazas where people will want to linger, meet friends, and get some fresh air, after work and on weekends. Toward that end, the city took a giant step in the right direction with the recently completed, $7.5-million makeover of Center Plaza, a once-barren open space that has been transformed to an oasis of greenery in the heart of downtown.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2002
Experts say the typical new home in 2010 will have more than 2,200 square feet, three or more bedrooms, three bathrooms and a universal design to allow aging in place. The future homes will also have added amenities making them more comfortable, more energy efficient and safer. Yet, the experts believe, the overall appearance will not be very different from today's new homes. That's according to the National Association of Home Builders' Housing Facts, Figures and Trends Survey. But what if you don't want the typical new home?
NEWS
November 14, 2013
November 15 is America Recycles Day, a time for us to reflect on our successes and examine where we can do better when it comes to recycling. The good news is that residential recycling rates have increased dramatically during the last few decades. That's an achievement we should all celebrate. And in a recent national survey, a majority of Americans said recycling makes them feel proud. That shouldn't be surprising. After all, recycling is a simple yet powerful way to save huge amounts of energy and conserve natural resources.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | July 25, 1991
It's been more than a month and a half since Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke received a comprehensive set of ideas to revitalize downtown Baltimore's economy. And though none of the suggestions has been put into action yet, the mayor this week will announce a list of top priorities that includes changes in historic preservation guidelines, traffic patterns and the agencies that run the city's public spaces.As early as today or tomorrow, Mr. Schmoke will announce the first few recommendations his administration intends to follow, according to Rachel Edds, a city Planning Department official whom Mr. Schmoke appointed to coordinate the overall project and set priorities.
NEWS
August 17, 2010
The cigarette butt-smell issue on the beach is an issue ("A beach without the butts," Editorial, Aug. 16). But not the worst or the biggest. It's a nuisance. Worse is getting to the beach, where at the end of every street sits the walkway and public toilet of ever dog in a 3 block area. Unfortunately there just isn't a lot of grassland around, and these public spaces have become public restrooms. People (not all) allow their animals to wet in the middle of the trail, forcing children and others to walk through it. Most owners will pick up feces, but nothing is done about the other liquid stuff.
FEATURES
By Ariella Budick and Ariella Budick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 2002
NEW YORK - When the Museum of Modern Art opens in Queens on Saturday, a little more than a month after shutting its Midtown Manhattan headquarters for three years for renovation, those who led the institution across the East River can only hope that Manhattanites and tourists will follow. One reason for optimism is that the new building's public spaces have been designed with such travelers in mind, pilgrims who cross bridges, shuttle through tunnels and approach the high temple of modern art from the No. 7 train.
NEWS
November 17, 2013
Despite all the changes that have come to Baltimore since the Harborplace pavilions opened more than 30 years ago, the Inner Harbor remains the city's crown jewel. Neither the opening of the best baseball stadium in America nor the rise of Harbor East has dethroned it as Baltimore's identifying feature, the one that is bound to be shown on TV every time a blimp is hovering over a Ravens game. Nonetheless, there remains no doubt that it can be improved. Some parts, after these decades, have become careworn.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
November 15 is America Recycles Day, a time for us to reflect on our successes and examine where we can do better when it comes to recycling. The good news is that residential recycling rates have increased dramatically during the last few decades. That's an achievement we should all celebrate. And in a recent national survey, a majority of Americans said recycling makes them feel proud. That shouldn't be surprising. After all, recycling is a simple yet powerful way to save huge amounts of energy and conserve natural resources.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | April 16, 2013
Less than 24 hours ago, an apparent act of terrorism marred this year's Boston Marathon. It's too early to know many of the details about this tragic event. Late last night, officials were reporting three deaths and well over 100 injuries; soon we will have a clearer sense of how many were killed and wounded. Their families, friends and co-workers will pay tribute to and then bury their loved ones. When they are ready, some of the wounded survivors and spectators will come forward to recount the horrors they experienced.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
A vision for the "greening" of downtown Baltimore is taking shape after city leaders proposed ambitious steps to keep and attract businesses and residents by making public areas more inviting. An open-space plan unveiled last February by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore calls for a network of spaces that link neighborhoods to the downtown by offering "visual cues," pleasant streetscapes and activities to propel pedestrians from one block to the next. The plan, the first of its kind for the downtown, envisions new or enhanced parks and plazas, as well as livelier streetscapes and public spaces that feature regular activities.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
The Downtown Partnership plans to unveil an ambitious proposal Friday to create more than $100 million worth of new parks and public plazas throughout the central business district, including major projects for the Inner Harbor, Charles Center and west side. The proposal would transform the downtown landscape, with a green oasis where the 1st Mariner Arena stands and possibly the demolition of the Lexington Market Arcade to reopen the street as a public thoroughfare. The proposed work could also involve the realignment of city streets to make way for plazas and streetscape improvements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 5, 2011
Overnight, the Baltimore Ravens painted the town purple -- and black, and on two memorable occasions, yellow. Rush hour commuters and pedestrians woke up this morning to find that literally hundreds of logos had been spray-painted under cover of darkness on sidewalks from Baltimore's City Hall to Padonia Station, from the Elkridge Library to Perry Hall Middle School in White Marsh. The designs -- the familiar, fierce-looking fowl, rendered in lavender, over bold, black letters spelling out W.I.N.
NEWS
July 26, 1994
In the wake of the urban riots of 1968, the idea of thousands of people flocking downtown for fun and frolic seemed little more than fantasy. Then in 1970, Baltimoreans surprised themselves with the success of the first City Fair. It was the prelude to the renewed burst of civic energy that produced the city's renaissance, from Harborplace to Camden Yards to the Christopher Columbus Center for Marine Biotechnology.The City Fair reminded Baltimore -- and metropolitan areas around the country -- that cities were more than a collection of problems, crises and blight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and By Edward Gunts,Sun Staff | May 23, 1999
"A Clearing in the Distance: Frederick Law Olmsted and America in the Nineteenth Century," by Witold Rybczynski. Scribner. 480 pages. $28.Genius is no more than a greater aptitude for patience," observed the French count George Louis LeClerc.A similar assessment could be made about the work of Frederick Law Olmsted, the social-reformer-turned-landscape-artist who was largely responsible for giving America some of its greatest public spaces. One of the first American practitioners of the profession now known as landscape architecture, Olmsted regarded patience as the ultimate virtue.
NEWS
August 17, 2010
The cigarette butt-smell issue on the beach is an issue ("A beach without the butts," Editorial, Aug. 16). But not the worst or the biggest. It's a nuisance. Worse is getting to the beach, where at the end of every street sits the walkway and public toilet of ever dog in a 3 block area. Unfortunately there just isn't a lot of grassland around, and these public spaces have become public restrooms. People (not all) allow their animals to wet in the middle of the trail, forcing children and others to walk through it. Most owners will pick up feces, but nothing is done about the other liquid stuff.
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