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NEWS
July 20, 2010
Tira Jones has simply gone from one form of welfare to another ("Stimulus-money jobs are a win-win for state; Ex-welfare recipients now get paycheck as they shrink backlog of assistance claims," July 19). Printing money or taking it from working taxpayers in order to give it to individuals like Ms. Jones may do something for her self-esteem, but it doesn't do anything to move the economy forward. It simply further bloats an already excessive public sector that "regulates," "reallocates," "analyzes," and "consults" rather than working and paying and producing and creating.
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NEWS
June 30, 2014
The Supreme Court didn't kill a key underpinning of public sector unionism Monday, but it surely put it on life support. The court's ruling in the Illinois case Harris v. Quinn, which related to the mandatory collection of so-called "fair share" fees from home health care workers whose wages are negotiated by a union whether those workers choose to belong to the union or not, was a relatively narrow one. It turned on the court's decision to draw a...
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2002
PARIS - It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas here, and it's not just the decorations. This is the season of the strike, and it sometimes seems as if just about everyone has walked off the job. Truckers seeking more pay set up dozens of roadblocks with trucks and cars across the country yesterday, but lifted them in the evening. The truckers claim that their profits have plummeted because of tough competition and cheap labor from central Europe. Among other things, the truckers are demanding a 13th month of pay, a common practice that serves as a kind of bonus in Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Jeth Mill has been named executive director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. Mill, pictured above, most recently served five years as executive director of the Windsor Symphony Orchestra in Ontario. His resume also lists top administrative posts at the Des Moines Symphony, Lincoln (Neb.) Symphony Orchestra, New Hampshire Symphony, and Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic. In a statement released by the Annapolis Symphony, Mill said he was "extremely happy to be returning to the United States and especially to Annapolis.
NEWS
By Matt Patterson | September 5, 2010
In January 1962, President John F. Kennedy issued Executive Order 10988, giving federal employees the right to organize. This little-known act, which effectively unionized the vast federal workforce, has had momentous consequences that nearly five decades later threaten to overwhelm our democracy. Prior to President Kennedy, it was widely considered inappropriate for public employees to have the same organizing rights as private workers. For one, it was accepted that while public workers received lower wages than their private-sector counterparts, they received in exchange valued intangibles such as job security and, as quaint as it sounds now, the honor that came from public service.
NEWS
May 19, 2012
Thomas Schaller make a case for how the private sector can be just as if not more flawed than the public sector ("Sure, government is flawed - but markets are too," May 16). One aspect of the comparison that he (perhaps intentionally?) failed to mention, however, is that in the private sector, dissatisfied customers always have the option of switching to a different vendor, bank, insurance carrier, etc. That's not the case with any government agency. That is where the private sector excels over the public sector.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
The Supreme Court didn't kill a key underpinning of public sector unionism Monday, but it surely put it on life support. The court's ruling in the Illinois case Harris v. Quinn, which related to the mandatory collection of so-called "fair share" fees from home health care workers whose wages are negotiated by a union whether those workers choose to belong to the union or not, was a relatively narrow one. It turned on the court's decision to draw a...
NEWS
June 10, 2010
In a world confronted by political, economic and social unrest, Peter Morici offers some sobering realities worthy of further discussion. ("Is sun setting on democratic capitalism?" June 8). Bring him back for future articles on any of the many provocative subjects raised in his article. For starters: How to preserve democratic capitalism while reigning in some of its more egregious excesses. How to define the proper role of government and the public sector which is now sucking vitality from the private sector.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
I'm writing in response to the article "Maryland ranks last in job creation" (June 18). This ranking should be of no surprise to anyone. Maryland has allowed itself to become almost entirely dependent on government employment. This has gone on for several administrations and multiple decades. Little effort has been given to private sector employment opportunities because the public sector employer has been the primary source of employment and of political focus. Imagine for a brief moment what employment would be like if Washington wasn't within a commutable distance.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | August 30, 2012
The recent election of a new president of the Harford County Education Association, the local teachers' union, has the potential to be something of a turning point in the discussion of important matters of compensation for public employees. For many years, much of the public discussion of pay for public sector employees has been centered around one of two extreme and largely unfounded notions. On one extreme is the assertion that government employees are overpaid, under worked and largely unnecessary.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
Your article states that Social Security worker Celisa Ford is "losing sleep and is stressed," fearful that she will have to pull her daughter out of college, because she has had a two-year pay freeze ("On the brink of the fiscal cliff," Dec. 6). I work in the private sector and have not had a pay raise in five years. I have a daughter who just left college and got married, a second in college, and one about to go next year. I am stressed too. Unlike Ms. Ford, I don't have time to take off work and whine in a picket line on North Greene Street.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | August 30, 2012
The recent election of a new president of the Harford County Education Association, the local teachers' union, has the potential to be something of a turning point in the discussion of important matters of compensation for public employees. For many years, much of the public discussion of pay for public sector employees has been centered around one of two extreme and largely unfounded notions. On one extreme is the assertion that government employees are overpaid, under worked and largely unnecessary.
NEWS
July 19, 2012
Last week, the board that governs Baltimore County's employee pension system reduced its projection for investment return from 7.875 percent to 7.25 percent, a significant cut as these things go. The trustees of Maryland's much-larger pension plan considered a reduction as well but ultimately voted to keep a 7.75 percent estimate at a meeting Tuesday. For a pension system to recalculate rate of return is hardly new. This is done periodically as the long-term economic outlook changes.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
Sean Kennedy of the ever-voluble Maryland Policy Institute attempts in "Annapolis dines at federal expense" (June 13) to indict two governments simultaneously. If ever anyone finds oneself on a side with government, do please watch-out; you may be under constant and consistently false attack. Here we find both the feds and Gov.Martin O'Malleysupposedly pulling another fast one past the insufficiently alert public. Well, if anyone is trying to pull a fast one, Mr. Kennedy is the real offender.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 18, 2012
The political world is a-twitter about the president's recent statements on the condition of the economy. You know, the one where President Barack Obama said the private sector is "doing fine. " Well, that one was not received in the way it was intended. In fact, it generated so much ridicule that a few hours later the president again took to the public stage in order to correct his initial assessment. The subsequent damage control statement did little to calm the political waters, however.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 15, 2012
One of the saving graces of politics is that all practitioners, regardless of party or ideology, have equal opportunity to shoot themselves in the foot, and many take it. After months of Republican Mitt Romney repeatedly committing acts of self-immolation with witless, careless or just plain politically insensitive remarks, now comes President Barack Obama matching them all with his observation in a press conference that "the private sector is doing...
EXPLORE
March 20, 2012
Recent stories in the Howard County Times bemoaned the catastrophic financial situation that would result if the county must pick up teacher pension costs. As well, two letters to the editor did the same. Yet amidst all of this noise not one peep even obliquely mentioning the elephant in the room, namely the basic non-sustainability of pension funds. The private sector realized and addressed this some time ago, freezing pension plans and replacing them with defined contribution plans (e.g., 401K plans)
NEWS
By Elizabeth J. Kennedy | March 7, 2011
As the campaign to strip public employees of their collective bargaining rights advances across the Midwest, taxpayers — whom the abolishment of such rights is alleged to benefit — deserve a complete accounting of what they also stand to lose. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has characterized public sector workers as the "haves" to the private sector's "have nots. " This should strike all but the most removed from working people as absurd. Since when have teachers, social workers, nurses, cops, firefighters and sanitation workers been the "haves" of the American economy?
NEWS
June 11, 2012
Demonstrating once again that a sound bite is worth 10,000 words, President Barack Obama has been raked over the coals in recent days for what amounted to a six-word aside: "The private sector is doing fine. " He said it a press conference last Friday in the context of how the overall economy is recovering, and how jobs are being created overall but certain segments (housing, construction, teachers, police and firefighters) are not performing as well. Never mind that he later in the day clarified his remark to note that the economy is "not doing fine" or that Mitt Romney subsequently made his own gaffe - responding to President Obama by saying the country does not need more police, firefighters or teachers.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 8, 2012
Any way you slice it, the refusal of Wisconsin voters to recall Republican Gov. Scott Walker for limiting the collective-bargaining rights of unionized public-sector employees was a blow not only to organized labor but to the Democratic Party as a whole. On an issue that goes to the core of the American labor movement's ability to deliver for the party as its key constituency, big corporate and individual fat-cat money overwhelmed the traditional union muscle of political boots on the ground.
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