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NEWS
August 16, 1993
There are times when the nation's capital takes on some of the attributes of a shark tank at feeding time. That is one of the complaints left behind in some notes by Vincent W. Foster Jr., the deputy White House counsel who committed suicide. Reviewing the brouhaha in the White House travel office, Mr. Foster makes some vague accusations and offers a flimsy defense of White House staff behavior. These are deserving of some attention, but Mr. Foster's remarks about life in Washington raise a more substantial issue.
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NEWS
By Heather Patti | June 13, 2014
A new mega outlet mall - planned for right next to the White Marsh Mall - is being slipped through Baltimore County's development process without any public consideration by the County Council of traffic, the surrounding retail market, the environment or dozens of other potential impacts on the community. More than five years ago, developers first proposed a mixed-use project for the 88-acre property known as Nottingham Ridge off of Philadelphia Road and White Marsh Boulevard. They planned a mix of homes, office space and hotels, plus a modest amount of restaurant and retail that would be aimed at basic services for that community.
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NEWS
February 22, 1995
Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III is a can-do, combative administrator who is not loath to challenge the federal officials who are his chief source of funding. Mr. Henson's style marks a sharp contrast with his predecessor, Robert Hearn, under whom the federally financed public housing agency had deteriorated into a disaster during the first six years of the Schmoke administration. But Mr. Henson's aggressive style brings another set of problems.Evidence of trouble in the housing agency under Mr. Hearn's leadership prompted Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to spend $50,000 in January 1993 to hire Claude Edward Hitchcock, a private attorney, to review the city Housing Authority.
NEWS
By Joan Pratt | August 13, 2012
On July 30, The Sun published an op-ed by Mary Alice Ernish, founder of the grassroots non-profit Audit Baltimore, which contained a series of questions about the city's auditing practices. This week, Comptroller Joan Pratt, who oversees the city's auditors, provided responses. • Why have some city agencies not been audited in over three decades? The city's financial statements, which are prepared by the Department of Finance, include all of the expenses and revenues of all city agencies.
NEWS
March 27, 1991
* Alan Newcomb, 42, of Spencerville, manager of Fast Frames in Dobbin CenterMeetings should not be closed. As public office holders, they are beholden to the public, and the records should be available to the public. There should be very limited circumstances when and where they should have closed meetings. Officials don't want to be on the record with a lot of things. If you're quoted, it can be devastating. But I don't agree with it. They should be accountable 100 percentof the time.
NEWS
May 8, 1999
IMAGINE THE reaction if information about Elfreda Massie's financial problems had surfaced after she had accepted the position of Montgomery County school superintendent.Still, the county's Board of Education looks foolish because poorly handled background checks of its leading candidate failed to turn up a bankruptcy filing. Had the board been more open about the finalists for the job, information about Ms. Massie's financial affairs might have surfaced sooner.Maryland school boards often cite the personnel exemption in the state's open meetings law as justification for keeping the names of candidates secret.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | August 23, 1991
NEW YORK -- TRW Inc. is considering selling its credit reporting business, in part because of the growing public outcry and regulatory scrutiny of the business of tracking and selling sensitive consumer financial data, says Joseph T. Gorman, TRW's chairman and chief executive.In recent months, he said in an interview yesterday, he had become less convinced that the information services business made sense for TRW. "We need to take some strategic action" on the unit, which accounted for about 11 percent of sales in 1990.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 12, 1999
TOKYO -- When environmentalists in southern Japan started worrying that the chemical runoff from a proposed golf course would pollute an unspoiled island, they asked local officials for a copy of the environmental impact report on the envisioned development -- and were told that it was none of their business."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2002
A state delegate is proposing to introduce legislation that would strengthen protections for volunteers in medical experiments and open up the records of university review boards to public scrutiny. Del. James W. Hubbard, a Democrat from Prince George's County, said he plans to introduce the bill Feb. 4 because he was disturbed by the process by which a much-criticized Kennedy Krieger Institute lead paint study was approved. "We don't want to cut off research, but we do want to improve the protection of human research subjects and make sure it's done in everybody's best interests," said Hubbard, a 10-year veteran of the House Environmental Matters committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff | February 11, 2001
Windows line the back of Jeanne Mandel's sprawling brick home on a hill outside Annapolis, affording soothing views of Mill Creek below. But Jeanne trains her gaze on her husband as he moves around the sunroom, waiting for him to look back with those dark, soulful eyes that can see into her heart. Even after all these years, Marvin Mandel can hardly keep his eyes off his wife -- her shoulder-length blond hair, her glowing skin, her smile. Their deep emotional bond -- forged in secret and tested in the glare of public scrutiny -- is palpable.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
Final votes on the two bills that will map out Columbia's future likely won't come until the Howard County Council's Feb. 1. legislative session. And that will be after a series of discussions, amendments and more public hearings, council members said. "I actually think it is going to take until February," said council Chairwoman Mary Kay Sigaty, a west Columbia Democrat whose district includes the central area proposed for a huge redevelopment over the next three decades. By law, the council has 95 days from a bill's introduction to act on it or see legislation die. The two Columbia measures were introduced Nov. 2. Sigaty and other members said that although they've heard from more than 100 speakers in a multi-session hearing that began last Saturday and stretched through this past week, the council will need time to discuss changes, draw up amendments and let the public see them.
NEWS
October 6, 2009
The Baltimore Development Corp., the quasi-public agency that has shepherded countless major building projects in Baltimore to completion, has certainly done its share of good over the years in helping to revitalize the city. But the progress the agency has made also has come at a cost: The BDC operates under a shadowy set of rules that, even agency alums acknowledge, are rarely codified and instead are more or less handed down from generation to generation in a kind of municipal oral tradition.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
Barney R. Putnam Jr. of Columbia wants to find help for a woman at his church who has cancer but no health insurance. Rick Larsen works for a small contractor, and his fiancee, Annette Martinez, is a waitress. Both Elkridge residents are healthy, but they, too, are uninsured. They were among the small group who came to speak to Howard County Executive Ken Ulman and Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, the county health officer, at the first of three public meetings on the Healthy Howard health access plan intended to eventually cover all 20,000 of the county's uninsured residents.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun reporter | April 13, 2007
Harford County technology company SafeNet Inc. ended its life as a public company yesterday, shielding it from scrutiny of its accounting issues and stock options investigations and eliminating the threat that its shares would be delisted. The company was taken private by California-based private equity firm Vector Capital, which acquired it for about $634 million, or $28.75 per share. Shares halted trading on the Nasdaq about 9 a.m. yesterday, according to Nasdaq. "Vector Capital is a leading technology private equity firm, and we are extremely excited to have the opportunity to work with them," Chris Fedde, SafeNet's president and chief operating officer, said in a statement.
SPORTS
By John Smallwood and John Smallwood,Philadelphia Daily News | October 3, 2006
OK, so now Barry Bonds has some Hall of Fame company in the hot seat of public scrutiny - or, at least, he should. On Sunday, the Los Angeles Times reported that surefire Hall of Fame pitcher Roger Clemens is among the ex-teammates former major league pitcher Jason Grimsley accused of using performance-enhancing drugs in an affidavit filed with federal agents. Grimsley is the former reliever who has been out of baseball since June, when federal agents raided his home after he admitted using human growth hormone, steroids and amphetamines.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
As an agency that does the public's business, operates with public funds and reports to a board dominated by mayoral nominees, the Baltimore Development Corp. could have acknowledged its responsibility as a public entity and conducted its business more openly. That would have been the right thing to do. Instead, the city's development arm last week chose to challenge an appeals court ruling that dismissed its claim to privacy because it is a nonprofit organization. Shame, shame. The BDC (represented by the city's top public lawyer and at public expense)
TOPIC
By Jeff Kosseff | March 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - It doesn't matter much whether you liked the budget that President Bush presented to Congress last month or didn't. The spending plan is going to be changed a lot by Congress, and, in the end, it likely will be hard to tell just what was decided. Members of Congress will push a long list of pet measures this year. But barely any of the significant proposals will pass unless they're consolidated into a few large packages known as omnibus bills. This time-honored - and increasingly used - device means that members often don't have a chance to vote on individual policies that could affect their constituents.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
As an agency that does the public's business, operates with public funds and reports to a board dominated by mayoral nominees, the Baltimore Development Corp. could have acknowledged its responsibility as a public entity and conducted its business more openly. That would have been the right thing to do. Instead, the city's development arm last week chose to challenge an appeals court ruling that dismissed its claim to privacy because it is a nonprofit organization. Shame, shame. The BDC (represented by the city's top public lawyer and at public expense)
TOPIC
By Jeff Kosseff | March 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - It doesn't matter much whether you liked the budget that President Bush presented to Congress last month or didn't. The spending plan is going to be changed a lot by Congress, and, in the end, it likely will be hard to tell just what was decided. Members of Congress will push a long list of pet measures this year. But barely any of the significant proposals will pass unless they're consolidated into a few large packages known as omnibus bills. This time-honored - and increasingly used - device means that members often don't have a chance to vote on individual policies that could affect their constituents.
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