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NEWS
By Samuel Johnson Jr | August 12, 2014
The response to crises such as the 9/11 attacks, the Boston Marathon bombings or the landslide that collapsed a Baltimore street this spring inevitably elevate the public consciousness of the professionalism and courage of police, firefighters and other first responders. But sometimes a different kind of consciousness is raised. Corruption or lawless behavior by public-safety personnel - such as the shootings and looting by New Orleans police officers following Hurricane Katrina or, more recently, the police chokehold that killed an unarmed man on a Staten Island sidewalk, caught on video by members of the community - can undo all of that goodwill in a moment.
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NEWS
By Allison Pendell Jones | September 22, 2014
Big changes are afoot in city and state government, changes that could affect Baltimore's families for a long time to come. Parents who want strong schools, safe streets, green spaces and walkable neighborhoods need to step up and make their voices heard so we don't lose momentum in the effort to make Baltimore a more family-friendly city. On Tuesday, a committee selected by Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young will interview candidates for the City Council seat vacated by Bill Cole, who recently resigned to lead the Baltimore Development Corporation.
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NEWS
By Ellie Kahn, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Families stood in solidarity as a wreath was placed at Maryland's Fallen Heroes Memorial on Friday in honor of police and firefighters killed in the line of duty. This year, the 27th annual memorial to Maryland's public safety workers honored Maryland State Trooper 1st Class Shaft S. Hunter, among others. Hunter died last year in a traffic accident. "There are so-called heroes in sports, and then there are heroes in life," said Baltimore Ravens coach John Harbaugh to those gathered at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
The Baltimore Sun's recent article on a man charged, arrested and detained pending trial for a robbery that occurred while he was in jail on a different charge (" Man charged with street robbery that happened while he was in jail Aug. 14) highlights a serious and pervasive problem with the way pretrial release determinations are made in Maryland - namely that judges erroneously believe they are required to accept the prosecution's allegations as true for the purpose of determining whether to detain or release a defendant.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
C ity Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake ordered Thursday a comprehensive review of all city agencies and pledged to keep key public safety leaders in place as she began taking the reins of the city's highest office in the wake of Mayor Sheila Dixon's resignation. Rawlings-Blake, who will ascend to mayor as the city struggles with a historic budget crisis, spoke of the "awesome and enormous responsibility" that comes with the mayor's office. "I pledge to give you my heart and my time so that we can protect our city and deliver essential public services," Rawlings-Blake, ringed by City Council members, said at a news conference yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
Morgan State University officials said Saturday they have promoted campus police Chief Adrian J. Wiggins to the new post of chief public safety officer, in which he will explore changes to campus safety and emergency management systems. The move comes two months after a student was accused of dismembering a family friend and eating his heart and some of his brain. University President David Wilson said the new post will involve issues such as security of university laboratories, pedestrian traffic on the campus and relations with nearby neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley told a conference of state lawmakers and county employees Thursday that public safety must remain a priority, even as Maryland faces a nearly $2 billion revenue shortfall this year. He noted the recent abduction and killing of an 11-year-old girl in Salisbury and said officials must work harder to improve communications between agencies. "What could we have done differently?" the Democratic governor asked at the annual winter meeting of the Maryland Association of Counties.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Anne Arundel County's public safety unions won a major court victory Friday, when Maryland's highest court threw out a County Council measure that gutted binding arbitration. "This is a victory for all of our public safety agencies," said O'Brien Atkinson, president of the county's largest police union, the Fraternal Order of Police chapter. The county has nine public safety collective-bargaining groups. In a 6-1 ruling, the Court of Appeals ruled that a 2002 change to the county's charter that provided for binding arbitration is legal, and that a law adopted last year that effectively undid it is not. "As a politician, you can't come in and undo with the stroke of a pen what the citizens voted on," said Craig Oldershaw, president of the largest union in the Fire Department.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
A recent spate of high-profile crimes in the area around Patterson Park has sparked new and warring commentary over the perennial issues of public safety and inequality in Baltimore. It started this week with a blog post titled " Baltimore City, You're Breaking My Heart " from Tracey Halvorsen, who lives in the area around Patterson Park. Her subheadline: "This is why people leave. " In the piece posted on Thursday, Halvorsen says there are many reasons to love her neighborhood, but that she's tired of hearing and worrying about crime and is unimpressed with the city's response.
NEWS
March 17, 1992
Much has been made of Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall's failure to brief residents and local politicians about his plan to build an $80 million jail on a county-owned parcel off New Ordnance Road. His critics have a point. Anything as controversial as a new jail deserves tender loving care. But the key questions are whether the county needs a new jail, and if it does, is this the best place to put it?There's little dispute as to need. The county's existing Annapolis lockup is perpetually overburdened.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake's decision Tuesday upholding Maryland's ban on assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines almost certainly won't be the last word on the subject. The gun advocates who sued to overturn the ban won't be satisfied until they've heard from the Supreme Court, nor likely will their compatriots from four other states where courts have come to the same conclusion as Judge Blake. But her ruling provides a clear analysis of why the state's interest in banning these weapons outweighs the individuals' interest in owning them, even under the expansive view of the Second Amendment the Supreme Court embraced several years ago. No matter how often gun rights advocates like to quote the phrase "shall not be infringed" from the Second Amendment, even the current Supreme Court, which overturned a century of precedent in its determination that the amendment conveys an individual rather than a collective right, recognizes that it has limits.
NEWS
By Samuel Johnson Jr | August 12, 2014
The response to crises such as the 9/11 attacks, the Boston Marathon bombings or the landslide that collapsed a Baltimore street this spring inevitably elevate the public consciousness of the professionalism and courage of police, firefighters and other first responders. But sometimes a different kind of consciousness is raised. Corruption or lawless behavior by public-safety personnel - such as the shootings and looting by New Orleans police officers following Hurricane Katrina or, more recently, the police chokehold that killed an unarmed man on a Staten Island sidewalk, caught on video by members of the community - can undo all of that goodwill in a moment.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | August 5, 2014
The land along the northern edge of the Patapsco serves as the front porch to a bejeweled coastline, the product of a re-making of Baltimore's Inner Harbor in a manner and to a degree that could have hardly been imagined a generation ago. And then, several blocks north, in the once commercially vibrant area of Waverly, standing in considerable contrast, there is McKenzie Elliott's front porch. When a three-year-old is shot to death while merely indulging in the act of sitting on her own front porch on a summer afternoon, the magnificence and grandeur of the renewal of our city is dimmed and diminished.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A search is underway for a man who escaped from home detention in Belair-Edison this past week, according to the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. Brian Cherry, 35, of the 2900 block of Erdman Avenue, was last seen Monday, officials said. Officials believe he cut off his ankle monitoring unit and left his home. Investigators said he is believed to be staying in the Northeast Baltimore area. Cherry, who is 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighs 180 pounds, is serving a five-year sentence for possession of a firearm.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Baltimore County is adding additional police officers and improving nighttime lighting as part of a public safety focus for new developments in Towson, including next month's opening of a 15-screen movie theater. With multiple projects sprouting in the county seat, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Friday that public safety is the priority. He sought to assure residents that the county can handle crowds expected to flock to downtown Towson for the new Cinemark theater and restaurants at Towson Square.
NEWS
June 8, 2014
Great, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake ( "Mayor strolls to show safe streets," June 5), if we had the police protection you have then going out on public streets would be safe for us, too. But let the mayor not have all that protection around and go for a regular walk and then let's see how brave her comments about public safety would be. When you do that, Ms. Rawlings-Blake, then the public might feel it's safe out there. Until then, the murders and stabbings and shootings will continue by the thugs and druggies who control the streets.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff has returned a $4,000 public-safety radio he was given by the county fire chief last year following his arrest last weekend on drunken-driving charges, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz told Huff to return the device Saturday after the county executive was briefed by the police chief on Huff's arrest, according to county public-safety spokeswoman Elise Armacost. No other County Council members have similar radios issued by the county, she said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 18, 2004
County Executive James M. Harkins honored three workers at the Harford County Emergency Operations Center last week for their contributions to public safety. Michael Brunicke and Chris Hofmeister were given the Frank Heiser Award, which was presented to the 911 fire dispatchers for their outstanding service during the past year. Maria Joseph was honored as the Harford County Sheriff's Office Dispatcher of the Year. The awards were announced Thursday morning during a ceremony at the center.
EXPLORE
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 28, 2014
The written questions from the audience of more than 100 people came fast and furious on cards read aloud by City Councilman Bill Henry, moderator of the 3rd annual Public Safety Summit at Morgan State University on Saturday. What can city police do about underage drinking, motorists not stopping for pedestrians at crosswalks, and juveniles who are arrested for breaking into homes and then end up back out on the street, doing it again? Why is Roland Park less crime-prone than Cherry Hill?
NEWS
April 10, 2014
Last week, the media finally reported that the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance in Howard County needs updating, and even then only because the two county executive candidates started talking about it ( "County executive candidates to revisit public facilities requirements," April 4). The media has ignored until now what others have long been talking about. The current ordinance can slow development if elementary schools and nearby street intersections are not ready to handle the increased load.
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