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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
It's entirely possible that one of the august and influential guest curators for "Public Property," the summer exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum , was none other than your plumber. Ditto for your postal carrier and your daughter's softball coach. "Public Property" consists of 106 items — paintings, sculptures, manuscripts and jewelry — adhering to the theme of "creatures" and taken from the Walters' holdings. What makes the exhibit unique in Baltimore history is that the show's title, themes and artworks were chosen by more than 53,000 votes cast online and by museum visitors.
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NEWS
August 13, 2014
"Charge 'em for the lice, extra for the mice Two percent for looking in the mirror twice Here a little slice, there a little cut Three percent for sleeping with the window shut... " - "Master of the House," Les Miserables A business owner in Baltimore could be excused for feeling like he's living permanently in Monsieur Thénardier's inn from Les Miserables. On top of the highest income and property tax rates in the state, business owners here must contend with the Byzantine set of fees for what are known as "minor privileges" - everything from a table and chairs on the sidewalk outside a cafe to, rather famously, a papier mache flamingo suspended 20 feet above the ground.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Every year, especially at holiday time, a new round opens in the constitutional controversy over the placing of creches, crosses and menorahs on government buildings and in public parks. Yesterday, when the latest round reached the Supreme Court, the court agreed to take it on.The court voted to rule on a case from Columbus, Ohio, and appeared ready to make a new effort to define the constitutional limits of religious displays on public property.In that case, the Ohio chapter of the Ku Klux Klan got permission from a lower court to place a 10-foot-tall Christian cross on the lawn of the state Capitol building at Christmas time -- to counter a Jewish menorah marking Hanukkah.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 27, 2014
The Constitution is powerless against Satan. Earlier this month, the state of Oklahoma received a proposal from New York-based Satanists to build near the state Capitol a 7-foot-high statue of Baphomet, a goat-headed pagan idol. The Satanists' letter boasted that, "The statue will also have a functional purpose as a chair where people of all ages may sit on the lap of Satan for inspiration and contemplation. " Now, while the Satanists are real, there's a lot of fakery involved.
NEWS
May 13, 1997
In a May 4 article in the Perspective section on political lobbying by the broadcast industry, a quote from Reed Hundt, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, was incorrectly attributed to Bob Dole. Hundt called the government's distribution of the new digital broadcast spectrum "the biggest single gift of public property to any industry in this century."Pub Date: 5/13/97The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
March 5, 2005
Should it be legal to display the Ten Commandments on public property? We are looking for 300 words or less; the deadline is March 21. Letters become the property of The Sun, which reserves the right to edit them. By submitting a letter, the author grants The Sun an irrevocable, non-exclusive right and license to use and republish the letter, in whole or in part, in all media and to authorize others to reprint it. Letters should include your name and address, along with a day and evening telephone number.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
A Frederick man can sue the city over a monument of the Ten Commandments that sits on a parcel formerly owned by the city and visible from a public park, a federal judge has ruled. Judge William D. Quarles Jr. of the U.S. District Court in Baltimore refused to dismiss a lawsuit that says the 5-foot-tall, tablet-shaped monument violates the separation of church and state. The suit says that last year's sale of the monument in the Bentz Street Graveyard Memorial Ground to a private group was an attempt to evade legal liability while allowing the memorial to remain on "apparently public property."
NEWS
June 15, 1998
THE POORLY named "Religious Freedom Amendment" was recently voted down by the House of Representatives.This proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution, sponsored by Rep. Ernest Jim Istook Jr., an Oklahoma Republican, would have undermined one of the founding principles of this nation, the separation of church and state.The measure -- which attracted surprising support and is certain to be resurrected -- says "the people's right to pray and to recognize their religious beliefs, heritage or traditions on public property, including schools, shall not be infringed."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | November 18, 2006
In August, Allan J. Lichtman, an American University history professor and candidate for the U.S. Senate, was barred from participating in a debate with Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin and former congressman Kweisi Mfume at Maryland Public Television studios in Owings Mills. Also excluded because of low poll numbers were former Baltimore County Executive Dennis F. Rasmussen and Montgomery County businessman Josh Rales. After they refused to leave the studio's vestibule when asked, Baltimore County police arrested Lichtman; his wife, Karyn Strickler; and Gail Dobson, a campaign volunteer.
NEWS
November 2, 2008
Enforce state laws to protect resources Candus Thomson identified important weaknesses in the public's effort to protect its natural resources from those who steal or misuse them ("Baby oysters settling in as newest bay residents," Oct. 19). These deficiencies are manifested in the state courts' handling of the case of Joey Janda, the poster child for repeat criminal behavior with regard to natural resources violations. Mr. Janda, a commercial fisherman with a history of convictions, recently received for his latest violations a fine small enough to be considered just a cost of doing business.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich | November 26, 2013
State Sen. Jim Brochin questioned Tuesday how taxpayers would benefit from Baltimore County's plan to sell the Towson firehouse to developers, as residents called on the County Council to delay or stop the sale of that site and the North Point Government Center in Dundalk. At a work session that drew a large crowd to the council chamber in Towson, Brochin said it doesn't make fiscal sense to move the fire station at York Road and Bosley Avenue to make way for private development.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
In the summer of 1989, the Baltimore Harbor Promenade opened officially. It began with a 3-mile walk from the Canton Waterfront Park and concluded at Rash Field in the Inner Harbor. "The Promenade was designed as a permanent public pedestrian walkway with accompanying landscaping along the harbor's edge. When completed, it was to be 7.5 miles long and reach the Baltimore Museum of Industry. " That quote came from Mayor Kurt Schmoke's administration. The Promenade in 2013 remains public property along the waterfront edges of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, but many questions still remain about its future.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
It's entirely possible that one of the august and influential guest curators for "Public Property," the summer exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum , was none other than your plumber. Ditto for your postal carrier and your daughter's softball coach. "Public Property" consists of 106 items — paintings, sculptures, manuscripts and jewelry — adhering to the theme of "creatures" and taken from the Walters' holdings. What makes the exhibit unique in Baltimore history is that the show's title, themes and artworks were chosen by more than 53,000 votes cast online and by museum visitors.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
News that Baltimore officials are considering selling or leasing as many as 16 of the city's historic landmarks - including the iconic Shot Tower and the War Memorial Building - has sparked alarm and outrage among people who fear allowing them to fall into private hands could lead to the loss of a priceless historical legacy. No one wants to see these magnificent architectural gems turned into fast-food emporiums or low-end strip malls. But if the city handles the matter carefully, at least some of them could be transferred in a way that ensures they will be well cared for and preserved for future generations.
NEWS
By Rebekah Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
Residents upset with trees being felled in advance of the Grand Prix are going into court Monday to try to prevent any more from being taken down. But both the mayor's and city solicitor's office say all the cutting is done. A group led by Dave Troy, a software developer, is charging that officials violated city code by failing to give the public five days' warning, posting a notice on each tree that is targeted. In addition, the number of trees being removed remains in dispute.
NEWS
November 2, 2008
Enforce state laws to protect resources Candus Thomson identified important weaknesses in the public's effort to protect its natural resources from those who steal or misuse them ("Baby oysters settling in as newest bay residents," Oct. 19). These deficiencies are manifested in the state courts' handling of the case of Joey Janda, the poster child for repeat criminal behavior with regard to natural resources violations. Mr. Janda, a commercial fisherman with a history of convictions, recently received for his latest violations a fine small enough to be considered just a cost of doing business.
NEWS
December 19, 1997
FOR THE PAST DECADE, Anne Arundel County landscape and maintenance workers have engaged in a holiday ritual.They spray deer repellent on evergreens located on public property.They aren't worried about browsing deer. Their concern is two-legged animals cutting these trees down for their holiday decorations.If these trees get cut illegally and moved into warm surroundings, such as a living room, the repellent emits a stench that smells like burning hair. This technique has reduced the theft of trees to a negligible level.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
In the summer of 1989, the Baltimore Harbor Promenade opened officially. It began with a 3-mile walk from the Canton Waterfront Park and concluded at Rash Field in the Inner Harbor. "The Promenade was designed as a permanent public pedestrian walkway with accompanying landscaping along the harbor's edge. When completed, it was to be 7.5 miles long and reach the Baltimore Museum of Industry. " That quote came from Mayor Kurt Schmoke's administration. The Promenade in 2013 remains public property along the waterfront edges of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, but many questions still remain about its future.
NEWS
December 11, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- Trash littering the side of a busy Baltimore intersection. THE BACKSTORY -- Dirty streets and trash piled in empty lots are among the most common complaints to Watchdog and among the least-written-about. Pick one bad spot and people will write in with dozens more, all far worse. But Robert Wray of York, Pa., found a spot that seems indicative of a wider problem. He sent in a photo of a park bench at Patapsco Avenue and Annapolis Road smeared with white bird droppings and drowning in a collection of papers, plastic water bottles and other debris.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | November 18, 2006
In August, Allan J. Lichtman, an American University history professor and candidate for the U.S. Senate, was barred from participating in a debate with Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin and former congressman Kweisi Mfume at Maryland Public Television studios in Owings Mills. Also excluded because of low poll numbers were former Baltimore County Executive Dennis F. Rasmussen and Montgomery County businessman Josh Rales. After they refused to leave the studio's vestibule when asked, Baltimore County police arrested Lichtman; his wife, Karyn Strickler; and Gail Dobson, a campaign volunteer.
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