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NEWS
March 27, 1991
* Alan Newcomb, 42, of Spencerville, manager of Fast Frames in Dobbin CenterMeetings should not be closed. As public office holders, they are beholden to the public, and the records should be available to the public. There should be very limited circumstances when and where they should have closed meetings. Officials don't want to be on the record with a lot of things. If you're quoted, it can be devastating. But I don't agree with it. They should be accountable 100 percentof the time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While Maryland health officials urged caregivers this week to be alert for possible Ebola virus cases, they were also quick to emphasize there are other — perhaps more contagious — pathogens that they are also monitoring. Public health officials around the world remain on watch for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, while the United States is on guard for enterovirus D68 cases among children. As flu season begins, surveillance for that illness is resuming, and other potentially deadly threats such as avian flu lurk, as well.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2002
Rosario "Sol" Cicero, a Baltimore barber to an era of public officials, died Thursday of a heart ailment and pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 105. He cut hair for 70 years in the heart of the city for a clientele that included downtown businessmen and lawyers, governors and even prizefighters, until he retired in 1980. His customer roster read like a who's who of the officials at the time -- including Mayor and Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin, Rep. Edward A. Garmatz, Govs.
HEALTH
Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
As health officials fail to contain West Africa's Ebola outbreak, recent scares at two Baltimore-area hospitals highlight the need for hospitals here and across the United States to prepare space and equipment for what some consider inevitable - the arrival of the deadly virus here. While experts say the chances of an epidemic spreading in the U.S. are low, there is a real possibility that someone could come down with Ebola after returning from a trip to Africa, they said. Hospitals routinely ask patients with flu-like symptoms whether they have visited that continent recently.
NEWS
By Robert M. O'Neil | February 8, 1998
Every president from George Washington to Bill Clinton has probably wished that he could file a libel suit against the media for disseminating some outrageous falsehood about his personal official conduct.During the early days of the Clinton sex scandal, the public was flooded with media reports, some of which appear to be false. The report that a DNA-stained dress would topple the president seems to have been discredited. And the Dallas Morning News retracted its report that a witness might have caught Monica Lewinsky and the president in an intimate encounter.
NEWS
October 8, 1999
IT'S a tradition in Maryland -- a shameful one -- that when politicians break the law and disgrace their elective offices, they are quickly forgiven, usually with a mere slap on the wrist. The latest examples are now sadly unfolding. Larry Young, a former state senator removed from office for using his legislative post to enrich himself, has been acquitted by a jury. Bruce C. Bereano, a top lobbyist who spent time in prison for defrauding clients, used his connections to get top judges and politicians to praise him as a paragon of virtue in an effort to avoid disbarment.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
The Maryland State Archives in Annapolis has made available an important new reference resource for historians and genealogists.The resource, "An Historical List of Public Officials of Maryland," has the names of nearly 32,000 Maryland public officials from 1632 to the present and will be of enormous value to scholars and researchers interested in the history of Maryland.The book is the first volume in a new series of the Archives of Maryland collection of transcribed documents and indexes that was published from 1883 to 1972.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
The removal of Robert Small, a concerned parent who voiced his concerns at a forum on the introduction of the Common Core curriculum standards, was uncalled for ( "Robert Small deserves an apology," Sept. 23). Every parent should be entitled to express their concerns to the public officials who approve policy decisions regarding their children's education. Forums are platforms where an issue can be debated, and parents being escorted out or questioned via notecards circumvents that debate.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
Former U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese last night accused public officials who criticized the verdict in the Rodney King police brutality case of pouring "gas on the flames" rather than trying to ease tensions that led to rioting in Los Angeles two weeks ago.Mr. Meese said that the criticisms created "an atmosphere that appeared to justify the type of disorders that took place [in Los Angeles] and elsewhere in the United States.""It [the rioting] should not have happened," he said in a speech before the National Troopers Coalition,which is meeting at the BWI-Holiday Inn in Linthicum.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
One thing that happened in Vegas last week certainly won't stay in Vegas: The lobbyists Lisa Harris Jones and Sean Malone were married there before about 100 well-wishers, who included some of Maryland's top government officials - including the wedding officiant, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Malone, a one-time top aide to Gov. Martin O'Malley, and Jones, perennially among the state's highest-earning lobbyists, joined professional forces five years ago and on Tuesday were married in Las Vegas by Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's announcement last week that Baltimore would put public officials' financial disclosure statements online was both a welcome step forward and a sign of just how far Maryland has to go to be truly transparent. The city's forms - which include things such as officials' outside employment, real estate holdings and investments - may soon be available on the web, but those who want to look at them will first have to go to City Hall, verify their identity and register for access.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Returning from a religious service (let's omit the denomination), I described it to my college roommate, who asked, "Why do those people bother to be there? What's their purpose?" I answered, "I believe that their purpose is to mean well . "  I have the same reaction to most public prayer at secular occasions: little anodyne sentiments that appear to do little to establish comity and civility. Wouldn't mind dispensing with dragging God into zoning disputes and school boundaries.  But then there are those who want their public prayer full-blooded, invoking not only God but insisting that Jesus participate in the proceedings.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man was arrested Friday after police said he threatened violence against a county councilman and the presiding officers of the General Assembly - an incident allegedly touched off by his outrage over the construction of a drainage pond. Paul David Grimm, 58, of 100 block of Tarks Lane in Severna Park, was charged with three counts of threatening a public official. Police said the threats came after Councilman Dick Ladd visited Grimm's neighborhood to discuss his concerns about the project in his community.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
William D. Townsend, former assistant director of Baltimore County's Department of Public Works and a World War II veteran, died Feb. 23 at Forest Hill Health and Rehabilitation Center in Harford County. He was 92. "The cause of death was failure to thrive," said a son, Michael Townsend, who edited The Baltimore Sun's Harford Sun from 1980 to 1993 and lives in Burlington, Vt. The son of a hunting and fishing guide and a restaurant worker, William Dumond Townsend was born and raised in Timonium.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Del. Don H. Dwyer Jr., convicted twice of alcohol-related offenses over the past two years, urged fellow lawmakers Wednesday to approve his bill requiring mandatory minimum sentences for officials convicted of drunken driving. The Anne Arundel County Republican was one of two witnesses in favor of the bill at a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee. He argued that elected officials who violate the law should be punished more severely than ordinary citizens. "You are held to a higher standard, and you are not an average Joe," was the message the judge in Dwyer's case delivered to him, the lawmaker told the committee.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
Saying it was inspired by his own run-ins with alcohol and the law, Del. Donald H. Dwyer Jr. has introduced legislation that would require jail time and rehab for public officials convicted of drunken driving and would subject legislators to removal from office if they're jailed for any offense. "Clearly, we should be held to a higher standard," said Dwyer, an Anne Arundel County Republican. The three-term delegate is serving 30 weekends in jail after being convicted of drunken driving in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
The Anne Arundel County measure that could have required County Executive John R. Leopold to repay his legal expenses was withdrawn Monday night before it came to a vote. County Councilman Jamie Benoit, the sponsor, said he plans to let the state deal with the question of forcing public officials to repay taxpayers when a politician's actions put the government on the losing end of a lawsuit. The withdrawn legislation by Benoit, a Democrat from Crownsville, was similar to a state bill proposed by Sen. Bryan Simonaire, a Republican from Pasadena.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Baltimore County Council members plan to introduce a set of amendments tonight that would weaken parts of County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's ethics reform proposal. All members of the council are listed as sponsors of the amendments. Here are some examples of what they would do: •    The original bill said council members could accept free tickets to charitable, cultural, sporting and political events -- if the ticket came from the person sponsoring or conducting the event.  An amendment strikes the words “from the person sponsoring or conducting the event,” so they could take tickets from anyone.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Maryland Republicans will consider what insiders are calling "the Don Dwyer Resolution" that encourages elected officials to resign if convicted of a crime that carries jail time. The proposal, which informally references Anne Arundel County Del. Don Dwyer and his 60-day sentence for alcohol-related offenses, is one of four resolutions submitted for the party's rank-and-file to consider as the Maryland GOP convenes in Annapolis for its fall convention this weekend. Earlier drafts of the resolution said the Maryland Republican Party would not support or endorse candidates who had served time in jail, but the revised version under consideration Friday night only applied elected officials incarcerated during their time in office.
NEWS
October 29, 2013
"Parents, you're the leading influence on your teen's decision not to drink. " Those are the words of Maryland's Attorney General Doug Gansler, a Democrat and candidate for governor, in an anti-underage age drinking public service announcement he recorded a year ago. Sadly, Attorney General Gansler doesn't listen to his own words and reportedly helped plan a party last June at which underage boys would be drinking beer and wine. The rules the parents "negotiated" forbade "drinking 'hard alcohol,' according a copy of the rules and planning documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The list of prohibitions did not mention drinking beer or wine.
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