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NEWS
February 24, 2012
Will there ever be a time when the Sun editorial board will present an objective case outlining all the pros and cons of an issue? Their latest failing is their position regarding teacher pensions and who should pay for them ("Kamenetz stands alone," Feb. 22). The assumption, it seems, by the Sun, Gov.Martin O'Malleyand now Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is that local teacher pension costs should be paid at the local level. It seems to me that the Governor is trying to unload costs from his already bloated 35+ billion dollar budget, and he is using the pension cost move to do that, and proposes that somehow, in the Sun staff's opinion, an "elegant solution," would be to raise taxes in a way that would increase the "piggy back" payment back to the counties.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
A Pikesville man has filed an Open Meetings Act violation complaint against the Baltimore County Council, alleging that citizens didn't get proper notice of a meeting where they could have testified about the county's new stormwater fee. The council voted 5-2 on April 15 to approve the fee, which they discussed at a work session the week before. County officials say they properly advertised that work session, where the council also discussed other bills. In his complaint to the state's Open Meetings Compliance Board, Ralph Jaffe said four people testified about the fee at the work session - a fact that he said indicates people didn't know about the meeting.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 5, 2009
The Baltimore Development Corporation, the city's quasi-public development arm, over the past year and a half awarded six contracts totaling $2.3 million to demolish buildings without publicly advertising the work, documents have revealed. Each of the six contracts was worth more than $25,000, the amount that is supposed to trigger public notice when work is requested by city agencies. Instead, the BDC asked companies for their prices, and, in the case of two contracts - including one for $1.5 million - did not award the work to the firm offering the lowest price.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
The closed-door meeting at which Morgan State University's Board of Regents decided not to renew President David J. Wilson's contract violated the state's open meetings act, a former Baltimore County government teacher alleged in a complaint filed this week. Ralph Jaffe of Pikesville filed a complaint with Maryland's Open Meeting Compliance Board saying that the board should have conducted its vote in a public session. The decision to not renew the contract of Wilson, who has been at the university for two and a half years, sparked outrage from students and professors who felt he had staked out a strong vision for the Northeast Baltimore campus.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1998
Money for a new homeless shelter in Westminster could be delayed because of a possible violation of federal housing regulations by the County Commissioners.Critics say the county failed to provide adequate public notice of two steps in its effort to move forward with construction of a 3,500- to 4,000-square-foot facility in a county-owned park near Route 140 and Center Street.The state Department of Human Resources is asking the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to determine whether the county violated federal regulations by not notifying interested residents of those steps, which include:The county concluded that the shelter would have no significant environmental impact on Longwell Run, which meanders through a 5.25-acre park in the 200 block of N. Center St. The stream has been the object of a four-year effort to erase long-term damage from runoff.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2002
Baltimore's City Council violated the state's Open Meetings Act when it met without public notice yesterday to discuss plans to reshape the council and the Board of Estimates, a Maryland assistant attorney general said. The council decided to add five bills to Monday's agenda in a last-minute response to a community group's plan to shrink the 19-member council by four seats and create single-member districts. How the council came to its decision is not known because the 90-minute meeting at City Hall was closed except for a moment when a 10th council member arrived and created a quorum, forcing the session open.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
Does Maryland have a bridge for you.It's free. It's historic. But you have to move it.Bridge No. 2081, better known to Annapolis residents as the Weems Creek Bridge, has carried Ridgely Avenue across the water since 1929. Now the historic span is eroding and must be replaced."Everybody kind of likes this bridge but they understand the thing is at the end of its life," said Glenn Vaughan, a State Highway Administration engineer. "It just needs to come out."The highway administration issued a public notice yesterday encouraging any interested parties to load the 96-foot center portion of the bridge onto a barge and float it to a new home, perhaps along a hiking trail or in a park laced with streams and creeks.
EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
Last week's article, "Board approves zoning district, despite objections" (Nov. 8), lacked key information. Council Bill 36 would authorize a new Community Enhancement Floating (CEF) overlay district which removes all limits on density, maximum building heights, minimum setbacks, etc. It can be approved by the Zoning Board at any time. Once approved there is almost no basis for any citizen opposition since CEF allows almost anything. Under similar zoning in Baltimore County, a neighborhood-breaking seven-story office building with tiny setbacks and large continuously lit signage across from residential property is being proposed.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
The closed-door meeting at which Morgan State University's Board of Regents decided not to renew President David J. Wilson's contract violated the state's open meetings act, a former Baltimore County government teacher alleged in a complaint filed this week. Ralph Jaffe of Pikesville filed a complaint with Maryland's Open Meeting Compliance Board saying that the board should have conducted its vote in a public session. The decision to not renew the contract of Wilson, who has been at the university for two and a half years, sparked outrage from students and professors who felt he had staked out a strong vision for the Northeast Baltimore campus.
NEWS
August 11, 2002
THE ARMY Corps of Engineers reacted indignantly Friday to complaints from elected officials in Anne Arundel County who claim they had not been told about plans to lay a 310-mile fiber-optic cable network underneath the Chesapeake Bay. After all, Corps representatives point out, they had issued a public notice on July 26, posted the notice on the Corps' Web site, and mailed copies to 425 agencies, groups and private citizens who had happened to be on...
EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
Last week's article, "Board approves zoning district, despite objections" (Nov. 8), lacked key information. Council Bill 36 would authorize a new Community Enhancement Floating (CEF) overlay district which removes all limits on density, maximum building heights, minimum setbacks, etc. It can be approved by the Zoning Board at any time. Once approved there is almost no basis for any citizen opposition since CEF allows almost anything. Under similar zoning in Baltimore County, a neighborhood-breaking seven-story office building with tiny setbacks and large continuously lit signage across from residential property is being proposed.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
Anne Arundel County's police chief could face arrest if he is unable to resolve a showdown with the County Council over his refusal to testify as part of an inquiry into corruption charges against County Executive John R. Leopold, a county lawyer said Thursday. Police Chief Col. James E. Teare Sr.'s attorney had informed the council earlier in the day that he would not comply with a subpoena because it could result in the disclosure of information relevant to Leopold's criminal indictment.
NEWS
February 24, 2012
Will there ever be a time when the Sun editorial board will present an objective case outlining all the pros and cons of an issue? Their latest failing is their position regarding teacher pensions and who should pay for them ("Kamenetz stands alone," Feb. 22). The assumption, it seems, by the Sun, Gov.Martin O'Malleyand now Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is that local teacher pension costs should be paid at the local level. It seems to me that the Governor is trying to unload costs from his already bloated 35+ billion dollar budget, and he is using the pension cost move to do that, and proposes that somehow, in the Sun staff's opinion, an "elegant solution," would be to raise taxes in a way that would increase the "piggy back" payment back to the counties.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
Baltimore County Council members are looking to amend a bill to permit controlled deer kills in certain public parks, but critics say the proposed changes don't go far enough. Council members said the changes are being formulated, but references to hunting have been deleted in favor of a "wildlife management program. " Other amendments would require the county to also explore alternative methods of deer control — including sterilization — and would clearly state that the bill would not allow open season in county parks.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 5, 2009
The Baltimore Development Corporation, the city's quasi-public development arm, over the past year and a half awarded six contracts totaling $2.3 million to demolish buildings without publicly advertising the work, documents have revealed. Each of the six contracts was worth more than $25,000, the amount that is supposed to trigger public notice when work is requested by city agencies. Instead, the BDC asked companies for their prices, and, in the case of two contracts - including one for $1.5 million - did not award the work to the firm offering the lowest price.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | September 19, 2005
From the moment he heard that a developer wanted to build homes near Druid Ridge Cemetery in his Baltimore County neighborhood, Alan Zukerberg has done everything he could to derail the project, even sending county officials footage of flooded streets in his neighborhood. But Zukerberg says the fight hasn't been a fair one, and he blames the county government. He and his neighbors were surprised to learn two years ago that the county had granted permission for the developer to clear trees along the cemetery to make way for the homes.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
A bill that would close what some say is a gaping loophole in the state's Open Meetings Act encountered resistance from a surprising source - the media - yesterday during a legislative committee hearing in Annapolis. The measure could end up being studied over the summer. "We are strong proponents of open government," said James Keith, speaking on behalf of the Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association, which counts more than 150 newspapers - including The Sun - among its members. "However, we have a problem with this particular bill because we feel it is written too broadly."
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
A Pikesville man has filed an Open Meetings Act violation complaint against the Baltimore County Council, alleging that citizens didn't get proper notice of a meeting where they could have testified about the county's new stormwater fee. The council voted 5-2 on April 15 to approve the fee, which they discussed at a work session the week before. County officials say they properly advertised that work session, where the council also discussed other bills. In his complaint to the state's Open Meetings Compliance Board, Ralph Jaffe said four people testified about the fee at the work session - a fact that he said indicates people didn't know about the meeting.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
A bill that would close what some say is a gaping loophole in the state's Open Meetings Act encountered resistance from a surprising source - the media - yesterday during a legislative committee hearing in Annapolis. The measure could end up being studied over the summer. "We are strong proponents of open government," said James Keith, speaking on behalf of the Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association, which counts more than 150 newspapers - including The Sun - among its members. "However, we have a problem with this particular bill because we feel it is written too broadly."
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
The Baltimore County school board violated Maryland's Open Meetings Act when it decided to renew Superintendent Joe A. Hairston's contract while meeting secretly in May, the state's Open Meetings Compliance Board has ruled. The school board failed to follow every obligation under the Open Meetings Act - from giving public notice to taking minutes to publishing a record of the session at its next meeting, the compliance board found. Although the school board could meet privately to discuss the superintendent's contract, it must still follow the Open Meetings Act, the ruling said.
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