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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Hoping to save what's left of Maryland's dwindling wild ginseng population, the state has banned collection of the sought-after herb on all state-owned lands. Worried that remaining patches of the slow-growing plant are being stripped from Western Maryland forests by pickers hoping to cash in on its reputed health benefits, the Department of Natural Resources announced this week that harvest would no longer be permitted in state forests or in wildlife management areas. Picking ginseng already was prohibited in state parks.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Hoping to save what's left of Maryland's dwindling wild ginseng population, the state has banned collection of the sought-after herb on all state-owned lands. Worried that remaining patches of the slow-growing plant are being stripped from Western Maryland forests by pickers hoping to cash in on its reputed health benefits, the Department of Natural Resources announced this week that harvest would no longer be permitted in state forests or in wildlife management areas. Picking ginseng already was prohibited in state parks.
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NEWS
March 14, 2006
Few tears are being shed by environmentalists - or even by many of her own employees - over Gale A. Norton's decision to step down after five years as U.S. interior secretary. She was, like her predecessor and mentor James G. Watt, the antithesis of her job description as chief steward of public lands. She chose not to protect these national treasures but to exploit or destroy them. Most famously, Ms. Norton opened millions of pristine federal acres in the West to oil and gas drilling.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, who is facing a competitive election in November, was one of 19 House Republicans on Tuesday to oppose legislation that would ease environmental regulations for border agents working in federal parks. The legislation, which ultimately passed the GOP-led House on a 232-188 vote, would waive certain environmental requirements for U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents. Environmentalists have raised concerns about road building and other construction in land otherwise protected from development.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is about to complete a policy change that will open millions of acres of national parks and forests to strip mining for coal or force the government to buy the mineral rights from the families and energy companies that own them.The policy change, in the form of a new Interior Department regulation that is due to become final shortly after the election, would give coal companies authority to mine a mother lode of coal that now lies beneath 40 million acres of parks, preserves and protected lands in 24 states -- roughly 16 percent of the nation's reserves.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | October 3, 1993
Hunting seasons for squirrel and ruffed grouse open Tuesday in Maryland, and over the next five months or so, seasons for ducks, geese, woodcocks, quails, pheasants, turkeys, rabbits and deers will phase in and out.Hunters often prefer to use private lands, but public lands in Maryland can offer diverse hunting opportunities on tracts ranging from less than 100 acres to more than 52,000 acres.Public hunting lands come in many guises -- Wildlife Management Areas, Cooperative WMAs, Natural Resource MAs, state parks, state forests, National Wildlife refuges and other federal lands, and some municipal lands and reservoir watersheds.
NEWS
By Tom Gorman and Tom Gorman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2002
SPRING VALLEY, Nev. - The serenity of the snowy valley is broken by the distant flutter of an approaching helicopter. Flying 15 feet above the pinyon, juniper and sage, it weaves and bobs, herding a dozen wild horses toward a holding pen. The pilot wrangles the mustangs, snorting and whinnying, toward capture. Their coats gleam with sweat; plumes of steam flow from their nostrils. As the horses approach the pen, partially hidden behind a rocky knoll, a cowboy on a nearby hillside swats his Judas horse into action.
NEWS
November 25, 1993
For more than a century, hardrock mining interests have profited from public lands, paying no federal royalties and acquiring title to government real estate for a pittance. Miners have been favored by a type of "homesteading" law passed in 1872 to encourage settlement of the West.President Clinton's showdown with sagebrush privilege, an effort to charge fees and impose environmental restraints, ended in sharp retreat. But the House has now voted resoundingly to extract royalties from miners of gold, silver and other heavy minerals on public land -- and use the money to reclaim abandoned mines.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler | February 1, 2008
More than 200 people turned out last night to debate the merits of allowing wind turbines in state forests. The vast majority of those who signed up to speak at a public hearing in Annapolis opposed using public lands for private energy projects. Pennsylvania-based U.S. Wind Force has proposed erecting about 100 turbines in the Savage River and Potomac state forests in Garrett County. The high-tech windmills -- 400 feet high -- would be built atop mountain ridges visible from Deep Creek Lake and Western Maryland's other tourist attractions.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | October 26, 1993
Ethics, those systems of moral principles, pertain to all of us -- whether we are butchers, automobile makers or hunters.In our professions, the ethic usually is well-defined.A butcher will trim his cuts of meat so that excess fat is not sold at the pound price of steak; a welder on an assembly line will spot his welds within given tolerances to ensure a vehicle's integrity.A good hunter also is expected to adhere to a code of ethics.At a conference held by the Izaak Walton League of America late last year, representatives of nine national and international hunting, fishing and wildlife organizations determined that the future of hunting depends on ethical outdoor conduct.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | August 3, 2008
Red, the color code for development, has proliferated on planning maps of Maryland since the 1970s. And if current trends continue, it will almost eliminate by 2030 the green spaces on maps of the state's central area and along the Chesapeake Bay, according to organizers of a forum on growth held in Bel Air. A presentation on growth that included a progression of redder maps was part of a Smarter Growth forum that drew more than 50 people to the Bel...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler | February 1, 2008
More than 200 people turned out last night to debate the merits of allowing wind turbines in state forests. The vast majority of those who signed up to speak at a public hearing in Annapolis opposed using public lands for private energy projects. Pennsylvania-based U.S. Wind Force has proposed erecting about 100 turbines in the Savage River and Potomac state forests in Garrett County. The high-tech windmills -- 400 feet high -- would be built atop mountain ridges visible from Deep Creek Lake and Western Maryland's other tourist attractions.
NEWS
July 2, 2007
No one in the cadre of national environmental activists seemed much surprised to learn last week that Vice President Dick Cheney is orchestrating the rollback in federal protections that marks the Bush administration's stewardship of America's natural resources. Most stunning about The Washington Post's revealing peek into Mr. Cheney's behind-the-scenes machinations was the depth and breadth of his involvement in a policy area not regarded as a key part of his portfolio. His many years in Washington - serving in three administrations as well as Congress - gave Mr. Cheney an intimate knowledge of how the place works, allowing him to put the government in service to his ideological and political goals.
NEWS
August 30, 2006
On Sunday, The Sun profiled the top two Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate with articles beginning on the front page and continuing for another entire page in the middle of the section ("Same race, different starting points," Aug. 27). I began reading with interest but was disappointed by the end. The candidates' lives were profiled in depth. However, the reporting on their stands on the issues was limited to a few lines, and information on environmental issues was missing. The Sun's profiles also failed to report on the biggest issue of our time and a defining problem for generations to come: How will the federal government address global warming?
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | May 5, 2006
ROANOKE, Va. -- Along a rocky path of the Appalachian Trail, Sherman Bamford pointed to a mist-shrouded mountainside in the Thomas Jefferson National Forest, where 121 acres could soon be up for public auction. The land is on a list of about 300,000 acres of national forest the Bush administration has proposed selling to help fund the operation of rural schools and offset cuts in federal aid. Forest Service officials said yesterday that they do not expect to sell more than about 175,000 acres in order to reach their goal of raising $800 million.
NEWS
March 24, 2006
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton, who gave notice of her resignation two weeks ago, could simply have ridden off quietly into the sunset. Instead, she chose to launch one final, potentially devastating assault on the vast and precious public lands within her domain. Under sweeping guidelines Ms. Norton issued Wednesday, state and county governments across the West are invited to stake their claim to any old trail or closed road through national parks, wilderness and rangeland with implicit assurance that federal managers will approve upgrades of such pathways into major thoroughfares.
NEWS
July 24, 2005
Land conservation important for future The Maryland legislature passed a law of special significance to all who value Maryland and Harford County's commitment to land conservation. SB306 prevents the sale of state lands by current and future administrations without a public process of oversight and approval by the General Assembly. Unfortunately, this law became necessary when it was learned last year that important and environmentally sensitive public lands in St. Mary's County were quietly being sold to a developer with political connections.
NEWS
February 19, 2000
A NEW volley in the old War of the West was fired last month as hundreds of shovel-toting protesters paraded through the town of Elko, Nev., to demand the rebuilding of a washed-out road in Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. At immediate issue is the fate of a 1,700-foot stretch of narrow dirt canyon road that allows vehicle access to a wilderness trailhead and to good fishing sites on the Jarbridge River. But the 10,000 shovels came from across the nation, including Maryland, as a philosophical protest against the growing power of the federal government and a confiscatory federal policy toward public lands.
NEWS
By JAMES GERSTENZANG and JAMES GERSTENZANG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush said yesterday that he will nominate Gov. Dirk Kempthorne of Idaho to be secretary of the Interior Department, selecting a former senator - and fellow bike rider - to "ensure wise stewardship of our resources." "Dirk will continue my administration's efforts to conserve our land, water and air resources, reduce the maintenance backlog of our national parks, support historic and cultural sites ... and develop the energy potential of federal lands and waters in environmentally sensitive ways," the president said in an Oval Office appearance with Kempthorne at his side.
NEWS
March 14, 2006
Few tears are being shed by environmentalists - or even by many of her own employees - over Gale A. Norton's decision to step down after five years as U.S. interior secretary. She was, like her predecessor and mentor James G. Watt, the antithesis of her job description as chief steward of public lands. She chose not to protect these national treasures but to exploit or destroy them. Most famously, Ms. Norton opened millions of pristine federal acres in the West to oil and gas drilling.
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