Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPublic Interest
IN THE NEWS

Public Interest

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 31, 2010
Recent statements have characterized the Clinical Law Program at the University of Maryland School of Law as a powerful institution bankrupting a family farm through environmental litigation really aimed at the "deep pockets" of Perdue. These statements demonstrate a fundamental misunderstanding of the breadth and heart of the Clinical Law Program. As co-directors of the Program, we want to set the record straight. Our program has twenty-three faculty and over 250 students who provide more than 110,000 hours of free legal representation a year to people who otherwise would not have a lawyer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Carroll County commissioners have lost their case against several media organizations and now must decide whether to comply with a judge's order to turn over email lists or appeal. The five commissioners plan to meet in closed session Thursday to discuss the case, which resulted in a court order last week giving the board until early February to provide email distribution lists used by the commissioners, including the email addresses. If they choose to challenge the ruling before the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, they would have until mid-February to do so. In an opinion issued Jan. 16, retired Howard County Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney ruled against the commissioners, who in March denied a Carroll County Times reporter's request under the Maryland Public Information Act for mailing lists, including email addresses, that the commissioners use to contact groups of people.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 2, 2010
The Maryland Law School Board of Visitors, which I chair, is strongly opposed to withholding state funds for law school clinical programs because of objection by those accused of pollution of the Chesapeake Bay. The Maryland law school is lucky to have one of the leading public interest law clinics in the country undertaking to safeguard Chesapeake Bay. The General Assembly's attempt to withhold funding strikes a blow against both legal education and...
NEWS
October 7, 2013
Campaign finance limits are back before the U.S. Supreme Court this week, and that's probably bad news for those who like good government. Think what this country needs is to give more political clout to the wealthy and those who seek special favors from government? Well, your wish may soon be granted. Tomorrow, the justices will hear arguments in Shaun McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission that challenge aggregate limits on individual campaign donations. Under current law, a donor can't give more than $48,600 to federal candidates during the two-year election cycle and no more than $123,200 when contributions to political committees are added to the mix. Those caps date back to the post-Watergate philosophy that there's a public interest in preventing corruption and the appearance of corruption.
NEWS
By EDWIN D. HILL | May 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Before utility industry deregulation reared its ugly head, rate increases and merger proposals were aired in the public arena. Sadly, the process has lost much of its transparency, and the consumers, workers and the industry itself are worse off for it. With two energy corporations, Constellation Energy Group and Florida-based FPL Group, proposing a merger that would create the second-largest utility in the United States, the need for...
NEWS
By COLMAN MCCARTHY | May 31, 1998
AT THE 40th reunion of Harvard Law School's class of 1958, held on a recent weekend in Boston, the expected displays of conventional success were on full and gilded view. These were senior partners at major corporate law firms, federal judges, old-hand loophole lawyers and fixers, and the settled and secure usually found in the novels of Louis Auchincloss.That would have been it, except that this group had a collective achievement that went well beyond the soarings of any individual alumnus.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel | April 17, 1991
Politics and public access make bedfellows so strange that one of them often gets booted off the mattress. On a national level, Oliver North's notes became confetti and Richard Nixon's tapes suffered 18 minutes of silence when someone expressed interest in them. The missing items in both cases had the potential of being politically embarrassing.That's at least one reason Vernon Gray's idea that he and other County Council members are the best judges of what should be publicand what should be secret is ludicrous.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 2000
WASHINGTON - It is finally clear that the nation's most famed and coveted ballots - in all their dimpled, pregnant and chad-bearing glory - will not be counted toward any official presidential tally. But as Democrats warned during the protracted epilogue of the presidential election, the disputed votes in Florida will ultimately be counted, one way or another. With the U.S. Supreme Court's decision Tuesday night relegating tens of thousands of contested ballots to the storage bin, scores of private citizens and interested parties are racing to examine the cards under Florida's "government in the sunshine" laws that allow for the inspection of voting ballots.
NEWS
March 28, 1994
Depending on where you sit, whistle-blowers are a menace to society or valiant protectors of the public interest. Bureaucrats hate them, public interest groups and journalists love them.The State Bank Commissioner is one who thinks they need to be curbed. The agency regulating Maryland banks is backing a bill that would make it a crime to disclose the contents of an examiner's report.Examiner's reports are not public information, and that is not at issue. They contain confidential appraisals of a bank's financial condition, management and operations that are not meant for general circulation.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | July 31, 2009
Maryland energy regulators said Thursday that more time is required to review Constellation Energy Group's $4.5 billion deal with a French utility, forcing the company to miss its deadline to close the transaction. Constellation said it was disappointed and warned that "any delay in a transaction of this magnitude adds to the risk of it not closing, which would be a real loss for Maryland." The Public Service Commission had expected to issue a decision by Sept. 17 on whether the company's agreement to sell half its nuclear power business to Electricite de France is in the public's interest.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
In response to the recent article regarding credit unions and their competition ("Banks take fight to credit unions," July 17): Yes, credit unions have seen substantial growth in membership and use of credit union products and services as more Americans have moved to credit unions as their primary financial institution. Why? Service first followed by rates. But don't confuse our federally approved "tax-exempt" status as not paying taxes. We certainly do, to include payroll, property, etc., just not income or sales.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
Your recent article about Sen. Robert A. Zirkin's dispute with Columbia Gas unfairly portrayed the senator's efforts to convince the company to reroute its proposed underground high-pressure transmission pipeline ("Senator, gas company clash over pipeline," March 3). The article implies that Senator Zirkin is leading this effort solely for personal gain. In fact, he and his family are not directly affected by the proposed new route. But he has given voice to the concerns of those of us who will be. Instead of concentrating on the issues at hand, your article diverges into matters that are irrelevant to the fundamental question: Why does Columbia Gas need another pipeline and why, except for a recent change that excludes Gun Powder State Park, is expansion of the current right-of-way the only viable alternative being considered?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
The Maryland Senate turned back efforts Thursday to allow taping of committee voting sessions and to make it more likely that people who come to Annapolis to testify on bills will be heard. On the recommendation of the Rules Committee,  senators rejected an effort by Sen. Allan Kittleman, a Howard County Republican, to make public an audio record of the discussions that take place before committees vote on whether to kill bills or let them move to the floor for action. The vote was 41-6 against.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | October 11, 2012
Whatever they've got to say, they can say in front of everyone. This is a modern take on the founding notion of the United States that the public is entitled to know about the formulation implementation of public policy. There are a few instances under the law that allow government business to be conducted in a closed forum, but they are specific and designed to protect the public interest in, for example, land dealings. They are not, as Harford County government's chief of staff put it earlier this week, to make it possible to have a meeting "in a very constructive setting.
NEWS
August 8, 2012
Here are the best things you can say about Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's use of complementary tickets to shows at 1st Mariner Arena : Every mayor has done it, and the number of tickets she and her family used make up a relatively small portion of those her office doled out. And it's not like she was stealing gift cards from poor kids. Indeed, there are plenty of worse things she could do, but plenty of better ones, too. In the grand scheme of challenges Ms. Rawlings-Blake has faced - from budget deficits to out of control pension obligations - this doesn't amount to much.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
There is a certain reliable pattern to each Maryland General Assembly session: The House and Senate will be at odds, 90 days worth of legislating will be condensed to about three weeks, and most bills of substance will be deferred or delayed. It's also predictable that at some point, local governments will groan and moan about how state government is usurping their authority. Well, with less than a week left in the session, it's that time of year again. Local leaders from Western Maryland to the Eastern Shore see Annapolis trampling local decision-making rights from land planning to government ethics, and they don't much like it. At some level, it's understandable that county executives, commissioners and council members want to make their choices unencumbered by state and federal mandates.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Carroll County commissioners have lost their case against several media organizations and now must decide whether to comply with a judge's order to turn over email lists or appeal. The five commissioners plan to meet in closed session Thursday to discuss the case, which resulted in a court order last week giving the board until early February to provide email distribution lists used by the commissioners, including the email addresses. If they choose to challenge the ruling before the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, they would have until mid-February to do so. In an opinion issued Jan. 16, retired Howard County Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney ruled against the commissioners, who in March denied a Carroll County Times reporter's request under the Maryland Public Information Act for mailing lists, including email addresses, that the commissioners use to contact groups of people.
NEWS
April 1, 2012
For all the difficult problems the nation faces, from high unemployment to mounting national debt to the vexing war in Afghanistan, the contest for the Republican presidential nomination process has produced far more distractions than solutions. Primary voters and caucus-goers have elevated and rejected a string of front-runners, each seemingly more improbable than the last. And fueling it all has been the corrosive influence of millions in unlimited and unregulated campaign spending through super PACs that has propped some candidates up past their shelf lives and allowed for barrages of negative advertising the likes of which voters have rarely seen.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
Maryland regulators approved Constellation Energy Group's sale to Chicago-based Exelon Corp. on Friday, setting the stage for Baltimore to lose its last Fortune 500 company to an out-of-state owner. Exelon promptly accepted the terms imposed by the Maryland Public Service Commission, which means the $7.9 billion deal is one huge step closer to completion. The PSC's approval came with several dozen conditions that largely mirrored concessions the companies had previously promised, most recently under a $1 billion settlement with Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.