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Eileen Ambrose | October 24, 2012
The cost of in-state tuition and fees at public four-year colleges and universities has gone up by about $400, according to a new report by the College Board. The increase is less than years past. But also in the past, federal aid more than kept pace with rising tuition, and so the average cost for students actually went down, the group said. Now, federal aid is no longer rapidly increasing. College Board found that the majority of undergrad students paid an average of about $2,900 in tuition and fees for the 2012-2013 school year, after subtracting the typical financial aid package of $5,750.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 21, 2013
Congress is in recess, but you'd hardly know it. This has been the most do-nothing, gridlocked Congress in decades. But the recess at least offers a pause in the ongoing partisan fighting that's sure to resume in a few weeks. It also offers an opportunity to step back and ask ourselves what's really at stake. A society -- any society -- is defined as a set of mutual benefits and duties embodied most visibly in public institutions: public schools, public libraries, public transportation, public hospitals, public parks, public museums, public recreation, public universities, and so on. Public institutions are supported by all taxpayers and are available to all. If the tax system is progressive, those who are better off (and who, presumably, have benefited from many of these same public institutions)
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NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein | July 13, 1999
AMERICA's September-to-June, seven-hour school day was designed a century ago for a nation where few mothers worked outside the home and farm families needed their sons and daughters for the summer harvest. That's not the way America lives anymore. But few schools have adapted.When Social Security was created during the Depression, an average American could expect to live to 61. So President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Congress, exhibiting a healthy sense of fiscal prudence, set the age for access to benefits at 65. Today, the life expectancy for an average American is 76. But Washington, fearful of the ever-growing gray lobby, has been too slow to raise the eligibility age in response.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 24, 2012
The cost of in-state tuition and fees at public four-year colleges and universities has gone up by about $400, according to a new report by the College Board. The increase is less than years past. But also in the past, federal aid more than kept pace with rising tuition, and so the average cost for students actually went down, the group said. Now, federal aid is no longer rapidly increasing. College Board found that the majority of undergrad students paid an average of about $2,900 in tuition and fees for the 2012-2013 school year, after subtracting the typical financial aid package of $5,750.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 21, 2013
Congress is in recess, but you'd hardly know it. This has been the most do-nothing, gridlocked Congress in decades. But the recess at least offers a pause in the ongoing partisan fighting that's sure to resume in a few weeks. It also offers an opportunity to step back and ask ourselves what's really at stake. A society -- any society -- is defined as a set of mutual benefits and duties embodied most visibly in public institutions: public schools, public libraries, public transportation, public hospitals, public parks, public museums, public recreation, public universities, and so on. Public institutions are supported by all taxpayers and are available to all. If the tax system is progressive, those who are better off (and who, presumably, have benefited from many of these same public institutions)
NEWS
By Kevin O'Keefe | February 18, 2009
As Maryland weighs painful cuts in its struggle to achieve a balanced budget, how can the state justify providing financial support for Maryland's 18 private colleges and universities? That's the question raised by recent critics. Their question deserves an answer. State support for independent institutions reaches back as far as the 18th century. Known in its current form as the Sellinger program - after the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, longtime president of Loyola College - this funding has been evaluated and endorsed time and again by various state study commissions, by the Maryland Higher Education Commission (of which I am the chairman)
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | November 30, 1997
150 years ago in The SunNov. 30: THE CHEMICAL DIORAMAS -- A number of fine views, including likenesses of General Washington, General Taylor, Thomas Jefferson, and the diorama of Death on a Pale Horse, have been added to the splendid views being exhibited at the saloon of the Law Building.Dec. 2: Paving of Greenmount Avenue -- This work is progressing rapidly, and we soon will have a fine carriage way to our beautiful "city of the dead." Several squares have already been completed, and the work appears to have been creditably performed.
NEWS
May 6, 1996
Name change may bring funds state won't giveThe April 20 editorial ("Towson State's name game") was an unusually nasty attack on Towson State University, its more than 70,000 alumni, the current 14,000 students and more than 1,500 faculty and staff.The Sun obviously does not like the very notion that a state institution should think about changing its name or aspire to excellence beyond its ''class."Whether it is ''world class,'' Towson has offered and continues to offer a fine undergraduate and master's level education.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 18, 1995
MOSCOW -- In the dreary landscape of Russian public institutions, the happy scene in Evgenia Dutskaya's first-grade classroom at Moscow Public School 186 is a shock.Floors are clean. Lights work. Doors are on their hinges. Cut-out autumn leaves decorate the walls. Mrs. Dustkaya is smiling. And the children are . . . well, being children.The Russian public sector -- including public education -- is suffering from a lack of money and a lack of confidence. But the public schools somehow remain a repository of hopes for the nation's future, an outpost of good cheer in a land of the scowling and the failed.
NEWS
October 1, 1998
THE DECADES-LONG debate over affirmative action in college admissions has been more rhetorical and emotional than factual. Now comes an attempt to remedy that flaw and provide some substance to the arguments.A massive study that involved 35,000 students, 5,000 of them black, presents the first evidence that race-conscious policies are effective. The work is by two former university presidents, William Bowen of Princeton and Derek Bok of Harvard."The Shape of the River: Long-Term Consequences of Considering Race in College and University Admissions" shows no one was shortchanged when race was used as a factor for deciding on college admission, along with grades, extracurricular activities, test scores and family and alumni connections.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
Sean Kennedy of the ever-voluble Maryland Policy Institute attempts in "Annapolis dines at federal expense" (June 13) to indict two governments simultaneously. If ever anyone finds oneself on a side with government, do please watch-out; you may be under constant and consistently false attack. Here we find both the feds and Gov.Martin O'Malleysupposedly pulling another fast one past the insufficiently alert public. Well, if anyone is trying to pull a fast one, Mr. Kennedy is the real offender.
NEWS
By Marc Kilmer | June 13, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley has said he wants Maryland to be a "national leader" in health care reform. Sometimes it's good to be a leader, but sometimes being a leader means you are the first to make costly mistakes. Following the lead of other states in implementing the new federal health care law would be better for both taxpayers and health care consumers in Maryland. Governor O'Malley made his "national leader" remarks when he appointed officials to the board of the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange.
NEWS
By Kevin O'Keefe | February 18, 2009
As Maryland weighs painful cuts in its struggle to achieve a balanced budget, how can the state justify providing financial support for Maryland's 18 private colleges and universities? That's the question raised by recent critics. Their question deserves an answer. State support for independent institutions reaches back as far as the 18th century. Known in its current form as the Sellinger program - after the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, longtime president of Loyola College - this funding has been evaluated and endorsed time and again by various state study commissions, by the Maryland Higher Education Commission (of which I am the chairman)
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2005
While most public schools across the country are required to conduct criminal background checks to screen potential employees, policies among private schools differ widely among states and even among schools within a state. At a time when many states have moved toward gaining greater control over hiring practices at public schools, most have stayed away from private schools. It's a reality some experts say illustrates the largely unregulated world of private education, a domain traditionally wary of government interference.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 2004
NEW YORK - The New York Police Department, responding to new information that terrorists may be planning to attack corporations or large public institutions in the city, advised building managers and corporate security personnel yesterday to step up their procedures to guard against vehicles rigged with explosives and against chemical agents placed in ventilation systems. The warning followed meetings Friday and yesterday between Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly and Pasquale J. Damuro, the assistant director in charge of the New York field office of the FBI, according to Kelly's chief spokesman, Paul J. Browne.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
In an unusual rebuke, the Maryland Higher Education Commission urged the state's public universities yesterday to do more to hold down college costs by targeting financial aid to poor students and trying harder to cut waste. "We call on institutions to direct more of their institutional aid to needy students and make every effort to moderate tuition increases by operating as efficiently and effectively as possible," the commission declared in a unanimous resolution released after a meeting in Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By Andrea Leckey and Andrea Leckey,Tribune Media Services | October 15, 1993
College is in session and expenses are mounting. Costs concern not only parents who must adjust their finances to meet them but institutions as well.For the current school year, students at four-year public colleges are paying an average of $2,527 for tuition and fees, an 8 percent increase, or $193, over last year. Room and board averages $3,680, a 5 percent increase of $180.Meanwhile, students at private colleges are paying an average of $11,025 this year, a 6 percent boost of $576. Room and board averages $4,793, a 5 percent increase of $214.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
Jason Botel may be the most popular door-to-door salesman in Northeast Baltimore this spring. With a promotional video under his arm and an inspirational sales pitch, Botel works the neighborhoods around Pimlico racetrack, asking people to sign on the dotted line - and turn their fourth-graders over to him. What is this 27-year-old with wire-rim glasses and close-cropped hair selling? A new public middle school. And he has been wildly successful. After visiting families at night and on weekends for a few weeks, Botel has signed up 70 children, nearly filling the first fifth-grade class of 80 pupils.
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