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NEWS
April 19, 2012
Your editorial of April 15 regarding incoming SuperintendentS. Dallas Dance("Assessing Mr. Dance") states that he was selected through a "completely closed process. " This statement is consistent with your previous editorials, news articles and letters to the editor, which complain of the alleged closed process by the Board of Education in selecting the next superintendent. If closed is to suggest "without public input," then your statement is erroneous. Upon the announcement by sitting SuperintendentJoe A. Hairstonlast October of his intention to retire at the end of his term in June 2012, the Board hired the respected search firm of Hazard, Young and Attea to assist with a national search for a new superintendent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Maryland Transit Administration is seeking public input on changes to its bus system in Baltimore and the surrounding area, including two proposals that would link Dundalk with downtown and serve the new Amazon distribution center on Broening Highway. Under one proposal, a new route No. 31 would run between State Center Metro Station and the Dundalk campus of the Community College of Baltimore County through Harbor East, Fells Point and Canton. The line would run every 30 minutes on weekdays.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
The Maryland Transit Administration is in the midst of a "comprehensive review" of its bus network in Baltimore and the surrounding suburbs - the first in more than a decade - and it is about to open the process to the public through a series of workshops. "It's important that we get this done," said Robert Smith, the MTA's administrator and CEO. "We've waited much too long. " The effort, known as the Bus Network Improvement Project, launched last month and is one component of the larger Transit Modernization Program, officials said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A federal council took a preliminary step Monday toward protecting deep-sea corals off Maryland and the rest of the mid-Atlantic coast. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted unanimously to seek public input on what should be done to prevent commercial fishing gear from damaging the fragile, slow-growing corals, about which until recently little was known. Research cruises over the past few years have documented their presence in several of the many deep canyons cutting into the eastern edge of the continental shelf, about 70 miles off the coast.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Baltimore County's Board of Education is seeking input from residents about its search for a new superintendent of schools. Three public forums have been scheduled for residents to inform board members of issues they should consider when choosing a new head for the county's school system. The first meeting will be held Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Loch Raven High School, 1212 Cowpens Ave. in Towson. On Thursday, two meetings will be held, both beginning at 6 p.m. One gathering will be conducted at Woodlawn High School, 1801 Woodlawn Drive in Woodlawn.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
On Friday, the Columbia Association named Milton Matthews as its news president. He replaces Phil Nelson, president for the last five years whose contract was not renewed by the CA board. On the surface, the hiring of Matthews seems to make sense. He worked for nearly a decade as the chief executive officer of the Reston Association, an organization that oversees the planned community of Reston, Va. Both Reston and the Reston Association are similar to Columbia and CA, including assessing a fee or lien to residents who live in the community, So, it's a pretty good gamble that Matthews knows what he's getting into by leading Columbia's quasi-homeowner's association and its $65 million budget.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
Baltimore County officials are asking for public participation in a six-day planning effort to address homelessness. Government leaders, joined by the clergy, businesses and nonprofit organizations, will be working to find solutions to what is a growing problem throughout the county. The opening session runs from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at Trinity Episcopal Church, at 120 Allegheny Avenue, Towson. Consultants on health, housing, employment and transportation will lead panel discussions throughout the day Thursday and Friday at the Towson Library, at 320 York Road.
NEWS
By Karla Raettig | May 9, 2013
When first proposed about a decade ago, it seemed like a promising means to revive the Chesapeake Bay's devastated oyster crop: Bring in Chinese oysters, which are impervious to the diseases killing the native stock and also grow faster. If successful, the plan would resurrect an oyster industry that was nearly wiped out as the native oyster population dwindled to barely 1 percent of what it was decades ago. But under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a major step such as introducing an alien species into an ecosystem requires a thorough environmental review by the federal government.
NEWS
July 19, 1995
If Americans seem increasingly cynical about the political process, some recent policy decisions in Carroll County only encourage such feelings. In the past week, actions by the county commissioners and the Westminster City Council have telegraphed the message that citizen participation in government decision-making is a messy inconvenience to be avoided whenever possible. These lawmakers seem to have forgotten that in a healthy democracy, an open and accessible deliberative process is as important as the final result.
NEWS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Maryland Transit Administration is seeking public input on changes to its bus system in Baltimore and the surrounding area, including two proposals that would link Dundalk with downtown and serve the new Amazon distribution center on Broening Highway. Under one proposal, a new route No. 31 would run between State Center Metro Station and the Dundalk campus of the Community College of Baltimore County through Harbor East, Fells Point and Canton. The line would run every 30 minutes on weekdays.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
State and federal transportation officials studying the replacement of an aged rail tunnel beneath Baltimore are opening the discussion to local residents and Amtrak and MARC commuters. The 1.4-mile Baltimore & Potomac Tunnel, considered a key bottleneck for commuter and freight traffic up and down the nation's busy Northeast Corridor, is 141 years old and a curvy, tight fit for today's modern trains — limiting their capacity and reducing their speed. The aging tunnel cuts beneath the Sandtown-Winchester, Upton and Bolton Hill neighborhoods of west and central Baltimore, between the West Baltimore MARC Station and Baltimore's Penn Station.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
On Friday, the Columbia Association named Milton Matthews as its news president. He replaces Phil Nelson, president for the last five years whose contract was not renewed by the CA board. On the surface, the hiring of Matthews seems to make sense. He worked for nearly a decade as the chief executive officer of the Reston Association, an organization that oversees the planned community of Reston, Va. Both Reston and the Reston Association are similar to Columbia and CA, including assessing a fee or lien to residents who live in the community, So, it's a pretty good gamble that Matthews knows what he's getting into by leading Columbia's quasi-homeowner's association and its $65 million budget.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
The leaders of central Maryland's various jurisdictions will haggle and negotiate in the coming months over what regional transportation projects to prioritize over the next two-and-a-half decades — and officials are looking for ideas from the public. The Baltimore Regional Transportation Board must update the region's 25-year transportation priorities every four years, making them eligible for federal funding. "We're looking for long-range, regional thinking, not filling the pothole on your street," said Terry Freeland, senior transportation policy planner at the Baltimore Metropolitan Council.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | December 26, 2013
Such is the nature of Internet culture that when the general public has the opportunity to weigh in on what qualities a new superintendent of schools for Harford County are most important, the results are being collected and tabulated by a website with the unlikely name Surveymonkey.com . It would almost be worth it for the firm behind the service to have used the name classclown.com for school related surveys.(Google says the domain is available,...
NEWS
Editorial from The Record and The Aegis | October 16, 2013
Aberdeen's mayor and city council received a reasonable and rational request last week from a former city councilman. Former city councilman Mike Hiob suggested a second opportunity for public comment be included on the agenda at regular city council meetings. Generally, when the mayor and council meet, the agenda has time allocated for public comment near the beginning of the session. This is a good time for public comment because, from time to time, people will show up at a meeting of a local government to raise a particular issue - like the need that a pothole be filled - that can be easily addressed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
The Maryland Transit Administration is in the midst of a "comprehensive review" of its bus network in Baltimore and the surrounding suburbs - the first in more than a decade - and it is about to open the process to the public through a series of workshops. "It's important that we get this done," said Robert Smith, the MTA's administrator and CEO. "We've waited much too long. " The effort, known as the Bus Network Improvement Project, launched last month and is one component of the larger Transit Modernization Program, officials said.
NEWS
July 10, 1994
The Aberdeen Proving Ground Support Activity (APGSA)is sponsoring a public meeting and a 45-day public comment period on a proposed plan to place a cover system over the Old O-Field ordnance disposal area at APG's Edgewood Area.The meeting will be at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Magnolia Elementary School, 901 Trimble Road, Joppa.APG will display information from 3:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Bowleys Quarters Improvement Association, 1124 Bowleys Quarters Road in Baltimore County; from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Thursday hearing at Magnolia Elementary; and from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. July 20 at Washington College's Casey Academy Center in Chestertown.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A federal council took a preliminary step Monday toward protecting deep-sea corals off Maryland and the rest of the mid-Atlantic coast. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted unanimously to seek public input on what should be done to prevent commercial fishing gear from damaging the fragile, slow-growing corals, about which until recently little was known. Research cruises over the past few years have documented their presence in several of the many deep canyons cutting into the eastern edge of the continental shelf, about 70 miles off the coast.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | September 27, 2013
There has been great controversy regarding the forcible removal of a Howard County parent from a Maryland State Department of Education town hall meeting a week ago after he insisted on orally asking a politically inconvenient question about the Common Core curriculum. Only written questions were allowed. Robert Small was roughly grabbed and physically removed from the meeting and humiliated and handcuffed, although charges of assaulting an officer were later dropped by Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
Howard County last week hosted the first of three workshops designed to gather public input into capital projects and improvements for downtown Ellicott City, and another is set for next week. The first workshop was held Sept. 12 at St. Paul's Church. Additional sessions will be Sept. 26 and Oct. 10 at the Roger Carter Community Center, 3000 Milltowne Drive in Ellicott City; both will begin at 7 p.m. This year, the county included $3 million in the county's capital budget for sidewalks, curbs and other projects to beautify and improve the Tiber River basin and its amenities.  A portion of the money is also planned for water quality and drainage projects.
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