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NEWS
March 10, 2014
A Baltimore Housing Authority proposal to sell more than a third of its 11,000 public housing units to private developers in order to finance $300 million in capital improvements to the properties has got some advocates and tenants worried. Some are calling the plan a "giveaway" to developers eager to convert the units into market-rate rentals, and maintenance workers at the agency have expressed fear for their jobs if the buildings are sold to private owners. But what all those involved in the debate need to recognize is that unless the city tries a new approach, Baltimore's stock of public housing is going to drop anyway because of a lack of money to perform even basic maintenance.
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NEWS
March 10, 2014
A Baltimore Housing Authority proposal to sell more than a third of its 11,000 public housing units to private developers in order to finance $300 million in capital improvements to the properties has got some advocates and tenants worried. Some are calling the plan a "giveaway" to developers eager to convert the units into market-rate rentals, and maintenance workers at the agency have expressed fear for their jobs if the buildings are sold to private owners. But what all those involved in the debate need to recognize is that unless the city tries a new approach, Baltimore's stock of public housing is going to drop anyway because of a lack of money to perform even basic maintenance.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore's housing agency must pay a public housing resident $150,000 because the city failed to accommodate the woman's request to be moved, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday. It also must pay the resident's attorneys $10,000, increase exposure of its reasonable accommodation policies and procedures, train staff about those policies and "submit regular reports to HUD on its efforts to promptly respond to reasonable accommodation requests," HUD said in a statement.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore's housing agency must pay a public housing resident $150,000 because the city failed to accommodate the woman's request to be moved, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday. It also must pay the resident's attorneys $10,000, increase exposure of its reasonable accommodation policies and procedures, train staff about those policies and "submit regular reports to HUD on its efforts to promptly respond to reasonable accommodation requests," HUD said in a statement.
NEWS
May 29, 1998
RESIDENTS OF Annapolis' impoverished Clay Street community have an opportunity to better their neighborhood. They should not let fears from the past stymie their efforts to help the city's Housing Authority pursue a major federal grant. The HOPE VI project could bring new townhouses and job training to two public housing communities.The fears of tenants who live in Obery Court and College Terrace are rooted in history. Three decades ago, African-American communities were bulldozed downtown in the name of urban renewal.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
The date for a trial to determine remedies for a finding of discrimination by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development against black public housing residents in Baltimore has been pushed back to at least March. The second, or remedy, phase of the trial in the 10-year-old civil rights case had been scheduled to begin Dec. 5 but was delayed by disputes between lawyers for HUD and public housing residents over the taking of expert witness depositions, according to court records.
NEWS
April 14, 2002
Waterfront no place for public housing How ridiculous that the state is going to relocate some Annapolis public housing residents to a prized waterfront location ("A better view for public housing," April 8). Is Maryland's economic outlook so rosy that we can afford to throw away millions of dollars worth of real estate? The land should be sold to developers and the money used to offset our ridiculously high taxes and the apparent shortfall in funding for some programs touted as necessary by this newspaper.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
Baltimore will serve as a pilot program for a new national effort to channel more federal housing funds toward low-income residents and minority businesses, officials announced yesterday.Under the initiative, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will work with other federal agencies to coordinate programs and cut red tape to make it easier to put into effect a 25-year-old requirement that recipients of federal housing funds give preference to the hiring of neighborhood residents and minority contractors.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2005
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development should remain under court jurisdiction until it fulfills its obligations under the terms of a partial consent decree negotiated in a 10-year-old public housing discrimination case in Baltimore, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday. In a 19-page opinion, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the decision of U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis to modify the consent decree by extending the court's jurisdiction over HUD because of the "near total failure" to meet deadlines for complying with terms of the agreement.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | August 19, 1993
After some 30 members of an advocacy group picketed the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development yesterday over alleged rude treatment, HUD apologized to the group.Members of Citizens for Housing and New Grassroots Empowerment (CHANGE) also complained that local HUD officials did not view them as partners in efforts to solve problems in public housing. CHANGE members include public housing residents and representatives of nonprofit housing groups."We want respect!"
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has granted Maryland $2.3 million to help people living in public housing find opportunities for job training and education. The money will be used to hire local “service coordinators” who will work with people living in public housing, or receiving financial assistance from the government to pay for housing, find services that will lead to employment, according to a statement Friday from the department. In addition to connecting public housing residents with job training and educational opportunities, the coordinators will be able to guide public assistance recipients to childcare, transportation, and counseling, and computer and budgeting lessons, HUD said.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Hundreds of families living in some of Baltimore's most impoverished neighborhoods will get to move to better conditions under a proposed settlement that could finally resolve a fair housing case dating back to 1995. Attorneys representing current and former public housing residents filed the settlement, which still has to be approved by a judge, in U.S. District Court late Friday. They hope the agreement with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development will finally end more than 70 years of housing segregation that they say the government helped exacerbate.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2010
jbayne The private company managing an Annapolis public housing complex has imposed a series of rules that tenants and their lawyers contend are unfair, unclear and violate federal regulations. The tenants of Annapolis Gardens are upset over provisions that bar large groups from congregating in many outdoor areas and make residents responsible for guests' behavior. They also question why property managers are requiring tenants age 10 and older to carry a photo identification in the complex or face being thrown off the property, and have set a $300 pet deposit that is four times higher than those charged at other city public housing developments.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
Martha Benton, who was recalled as the articulate and empathetic voice of city public housing residents, died of complications from a breathing disorder Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The East Baltimore resident was 68. Martha Benton, who was recalled as the articulate and empathetic voice of city public housing residents, died of complications from a breathing disorder Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The East Baltimore resident was 68. "She was a cherished personal friend and a gift to the people of Baltimore," said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
Suing on behalf of residents who say their invited guests and relatives are barred from coming to their homes, the American Civil Liberties Union is challenging the Annapolis Housing Authority's practice of banning people from the public housing agency's property. The lawsuit against the authority, the city and others was filed Wednesday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court by 11 people. It comes as the housing authority is in the midst of reworking its banning policy, which was enacted in 1994 and which allows the agency to ban from its 10 complexes "non-residents who are detrimental to the overall quality of life for public housing residents."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | May 17, 2008
Samantha Johnson hasn't had an easy time of it. A year ago today, she was hospitalized in a psychiatric ward after attempting suicide, according to court documents, and was later fired from her job at Wal-Mart for missing too much work. One of her two sons, Timothy, 11, has severe asthma. Now Johnson and her boys face eviction from their apartment in a Cherry Hill public housing project because she's behind on the rent. Had it not been for a lawsuit filed Thursday by the Legal Aid Bureau on her behalf and that of three other families, Johnson, 31, might have been on the street as soon as next week.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Doug Donovan and Eric Siegel and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2005
Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that any remedy in a public housing discrimination case that involved the movement of city residents to the suburbs would be "antithetical" to his administration's goal of reversing Baltimore's decades-long decline in population. The comments were the mayor's first public statements on the decision this month by a federal judge that absolved the city of wrongdoing but found that the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development violated fair-housing laws by not taking a regional approach to the desegregation of public housing.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
Baltimore will serve as a pilot program for a national effort to channel more federal housing funds toward low-income residents and minority businesses, officials announced yesterday.Under the initiative, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will work with other federal agencies to coordinate programs and cut red tape to make it easier to put into effect a 25-year-old requirement that recipients of federal housing funds give preference to the hiring of neighborhood residents and minority contractors.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | March 22, 2008
On this block of Tyler Avenue in Annapolis, 17-year-old Kwame Travon Johnson was fatally shot Sunday night. A day later, a bloodstain and a flower marked the spot where his body was found. On this block, Timothy Hayes Marsh, 48, was fatally shot a month earlier. The family of the Severna Park resident, who was found slumped over the wheel of his 2001 Acura Integra, speculates that he was in the area to purchase drugs. And on this block is where Frank R. Jones, a 38-year-old electrical contractor, lived before turning up dead last month on a Davidsonville roadside.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
The 5-foot-deep craterlike sinkhole outside an Annapolis public housing building is filled with large white rocks to keep it from expanding. Three years after it formed and months after Annapolis Housing Authority officials said they were trying to get money to repair the hole, it is still eliminating dozens of parking spots for residents of the Glenwood high-rise, all of whom are elderly or disabled. Now, the sinkhole has a little brother: A second one has formed in the rear of the parking lot that circles the 154-unit building.
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