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NEWS
March 7, 2007
ISSUE: Hoping to quell a spate of shootings that wounded four teenagers in less than a week, Anne Arundel and Annapolis officials vowed to employ a "full-court press" in one of the city's 10 public housing neighborhoods. County Executive John R. Leopold said the plan to improve the Robinwood complex was the first step toward a long-term goal of stopping rivalries in the city's public housing communities. Authorities say violence at Annapolis High and a fight and shooting in November at Westfield Annapolis mall stemmed from rivalries in the Robinwood and Annapolis Gardens public housing complexes.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The Newtowne 20 public housing community in Annapolis is about to get a new life. The Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis has started the process to renovate or rebuild the aging 78-unit complex at the end of a dead-end street off Forest Drive. The project is likely to cost at least $4 million and will be done in partnership with a nonprofit or for-profit company, as has been the case in other housing revitalization projects in Annapolis. "This, physically, is our worst property," said Joseph S. Johnson, a former city police chief who is chief of staff and security for the housing authority.
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NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
Since 1994, the Chesapeake Children's Museum has taught Annapolis youths about kite-making, science experiments and the solar system.About a year ago, museum officials realized a problem: The classes weren't reaching all Annapolis children equally. Young people in public housing communities weren't signing up."The kids in these communities can't get to us because they don't have transportation or the parents may not be able to get the kids out of the house," said Denise O'Neill, chairwoman for grants and development at the museum on Forest Drive.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- Hoping to quell a spate of shootings that wounded four teenagers in less than a week, Anne Arundel and Annapolis officials vowed to use a full-court press in one of the city's 10 public housing neighborhoods. County Executive John R. Leopold said the plan to improve the Robinwood complex was the first step toward a long-term goal of stopping rivalries in the city's public housing communities. Leopold spoke of educating adults about family life. County schools Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell spoke of enlisting volunteers to check on students who are missing from school.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
Reviewing a bill to allow police to disperse loiterers in public housing communities, an Annapolis city council committee questioned last night the need for the measure if Housing Authority security guards already have such power.The city's Public Safety Committee grilled Annapolis Police Chief Joseph Johnson and Alderman Herbert H. McMillan, who wrote the bill, about the need for the anti-drug loitering law, which the council could vote on next month.The bill aims to create "Drug-Loitering Free Zones" and give police the power to disperse loiterers whose behavior raises suspicion of drug activity, or who have been convicted of drug charges in the past seven years, even if the zones are on private property.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Faith Parker has seen enough to make sure her children stay close to home.There was the time she passed drug dealers and felt afraid in her neighborhood; the time she had to slam up the window after two of them came running to her car; the time she heard gunfire from her back yard and saw a man shot.Yesterday, the mother of four joined her neighbors at Annapolis Gardens, one of the city's 10 public housing communities, in welcoming back the police. Parents and children lined the street to wave at the men and women in blue walking by with a small parade of housing officials and television crews.
NEWS
July 3, 1999
TODAY'S demolition of the Murphy Homes will bring the Schmoke administration closer to its goal of getting rid of Baltimore's aging high-rise public housing.After the four Murphy towers are gone, only one high-rise complex -- Flag House Courts -- will remain. It is scheduled to come down next year and be replaced with townhouses.Though demolition produces dramatic images, it is only the most visible part of Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III's overhaul. His reorganization of the management structure of the 60-year-old Housing Authority took effect two days ago."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1996
Five months after tearing down a huge, decrepit high-rise project, Baltimore is moving to replace some of the housing for poor families elsewhere by renovating vacant rowhouses and a rundown apartment complex.Yesterday, the Board of Estimates approved creating 13 public housing units as part of a $2.5 million overhaul of an apartment complex in the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello neighborhood.The step is part of a broad redevelopment plan to provide new subsidized and market-rate rental housing for low-income families.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
Carol Brown, who scrimps to pay her rent and feed her children when her paycheck is late, was one of hundreds of residents of Annapolis' public housing communities frightened by a plan to shorten the grace period for late rents.Yesterday, the city housing authority bowed to their concerns and compromised. It cut the grace period from seven days to six days, instead of to five.Officials said they wanted to roll back the grace period because "chronically late" tenants cost the authority more than $156,000 last year.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- Hoping to quell a spate of shootings that wounded four teenagers in less than a week, Anne Arundel and Annapolis officials vowed to use a full-court press in one of the city's 10 public housing neighborhoods. County Executive John R. Leopold said the plan to improve the Robinwood complex was the first step toward a long-term goal of stopping rivalries in the city's public housing communities. Leopold spoke of educating adults about family life. County schools Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell spoke of enlisting volunteers to check on students who are missing from school.
NEWS
March 7, 2007
ISSUE: Hoping to quell a spate of shootings that wounded four teenagers in less than a week, Anne Arundel and Annapolis officials vowed to employ a "full-court press" in one of the city's 10 public housing neighborhoods. County Executive John R. Leopold said the plan to improve the Robinwood complex was the first step toward a long-term goal of stopping rivalries in the city's public housing communities. Authorities say violence at Annapolis High and a fight and shooting in November at Westfield Annapolis mall stemmed from rivalries in the Robinwood and Annapolis Gardens public housing complexes.
NEWS
By NINA SEARS and NINA SEARS,Sun Reporter | February 22, 2007
Three teenagers walking through an Annapolis public housing community were shot Tuesday night by someone in a passing van, city police said yesterday. The teens, ages 13, 15 and 18, were each hit once below the waist about 9:20 p.m. and didn't suffer life-threatening injuries, said Officer Kevin Freeman, a police spokesman. The 13-year-old boy, of the 400 block of Captain's Circle, was shot in the buttock; the 15-year-old, of the 2000 block of Forest Drive, was struck in the left calf; and Rondell Alexander Franklin Jr. of Glen Burnie was shot in the left ankle.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | February 2, 2007
Devera Pounds, 52, is saving and waiting. She's saving energy by turning off the heat at night, even during last night's below-freezing temperatures. She's waiting for the first BGE bill to arrive at her Eastport Terrace apartment as early as next week. "When it comes through that mail slot and I open it up, I'll rub my stomach a bit and see which route I'm going to take from there," she said. "Other than that, there is nothing we can do about it." She and other tenants in nine city public housing communities have been bracing for this for a year.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,[sun reporter] | November 19, 2006
The redevelopment of two aging public housing communities could bring as many as 50 additional townhouses and apartments to downtown Annapolis, the city's housing authority said last week. Architects unveiled three plans for the redesign of College Creek Terrace and Obery Court that include a waterfront park, senior housing, a community center, and 210 apartments and townhouses -- with 164 of the units serving as public housing. Members of the revitalization committee, who met Tuesday to review the plans, said the preliminary sketches were a good start to a redevelopment process that began in the spring and will take about three years.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2005
If you walk around Annapolis' Robinwood public housing community in the day, you won't see much out of the ordinary. Some teens play basketball near a dilapidated playground, a mother hurries her toddlers into a car, three girls sit in front of their home, braiding each other's hair. Come back at night and it's a different picture. Cars - some with out-of-state plates and heavily tinted windows - cruise the street. Loud music blares. Teenage boys stand in clusters on street corners. When the sun goes down, residents say, the neighborhood gets "hot."
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2005
Concern over violent crimes in some Annapolis neighborhoods, including public housing communities, has renewed a debate over whether the city has enough police officers to patrol its 16 square miles. Annapolis Alderman George O. Kelley Sr., a former city police officer, said recently he has talked with former colleagues in the Police Department and has concerns about low staffing amid a recent series of violent crimes. Kelley, who recently switched his political affiliation from Democrat to Republican, has asked a city council committee to look into whether the department should be expanded.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2005
Concern over violent crimes in some Annapolis neighborhoods, including public housing communities, has renewed a debate over whether the city has enough police officers to patrol its 16 square miles. Annapolis Alderman George O. Kelley Sr., a former city police officer, said recently he has talked with former colleagues in the Police Department and has concerns about low staffing amid a recent series of violent crimes. Kelley, who recently switched his political affiliation from Democrat to Republican, has asked a city council committee to look into whether the department should be expanded.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
Taking aim at what its chairman called a digital divide, an Annapolis software company has donated 30 new computers to set up learning centers at three public housing communities in the state capital, giving underprivileged children a measure of online equality.The gift by USinternetworking Inc. included printers, high-speed Internet access, software, volunteer instructors -- and a challenge to other businesses."I want to challenge every company in the city of Annapolis to do just one thing -- donate one computer to someone who doesn't have one to close this digital divide," USinternetworking Chairman Christopher R. McCleary said in ceremonies yesterday at the Eastport Terrace/Harbor House recreation center.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
Taking aim at what its chairman called a digital divide, an Annapolis software company has donated 30 new computers to set up learning centers at three public housing communities in the state capital, giving underprivileged children a measure of online equality.The gift by USinternetworking Inc. included printers, high-speed Internet access, software, volunteer instructors -- and a challenge to other businesses."I want to challenge every company in the city of Annapolis to do just one thing -- donate one computer to someone who doesn't have one to close this digital divide," USinternetworking Chairman Christopher R. McCleary said in ceremonies yesterday at the Eastport Terrace/Harbor House recreation center.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
ST. MICHAEL'S -- They gathered at the secluded Harbourtowne Gulf Resort and Conference Center in this Eastern Shore community.It was a 2 1/2-day retreat for 54 supervisors from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, the quasi-public housing agency funded largely with federal funds.Housing officials said the $13,446 trip -- paid for by the agency -- was designed to lay out a strategy for implementing recommendations for the city's public housing communities.But Mayor-elect Martin O'Malley questioned the prudence of a lame-duck administrator taking his staff on such a getaway a month before he leaves the job."
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