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By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
Talk to some of the old-timers along Annapolis' historic Clay Street, and they'll say the neighborhood has seen its ups and downs: Once a vibrant African-American enclave, replete with black-owned businesses, the neighborhood struggled in the wake of civil rights-era rioting and the crack epidemic. The area is changing again, with a $24 million revitalization of the city's two oldest public-housing complexes, Obery Court and College Creek Terrace. The structures are being torn down and rebuilt with the help of a private developer.
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NEWS
October 5, 2014
So Maryland Speaker of the House Michael E. Busch and fellow "high-rolling" Democrats guffawed at Bill Clinton's joking about the contrast between public housing and the "posh estate" when they were gathered Tuesday night for a million-dollar fund-raiser, reveling in "one of Maryland's wealthiest communities" ( "Brown gets boost from Bill Clinton," Oct. 1). And this from the Democratic Party that likes to portray itself as so caring and compassionate, yet is so entrenched in one-party rule as to be only beholden to millionaire donors and lobbyists.
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NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | May 13, 1996
CALLING IT ''one of the last bastions of socialism in the world,'' Sen. Robert Dole, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, in late April suggested ending public housing in America.He was embarrassed when Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry Cisneros quickly noted that the substitute Mr. Dole suggested -- housing vouchers for the poor -- had been proposed by the Clinton administration but rejected out of hand by the senator's own Republican Congress.Housing vouchers have existed for years.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Sixty city public housing residents and union workers staged a protest Wednesday against a plan to sell the housing to private developers. Protesters fear the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's plan would lead to lost jobs, displaced residents and less available public housing. Gary Stroud, 54 and a resident of Bernard Mason Senior Apartments, asked the city to rethink the plan, called Rental Assistance Demonstration program, or RAD, and let "residents and union people sit at the table.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - A House committee took an initial step yesterday in a bipartisan Capitol Hill attempt to salvage a public-housing program popular in Baltimore and other cities that has been targeted by the Bush administration. The House Financial Services Committee approved legislation to extend the life of HOPE VI, a $5 billion, 10-year-old effort to rebuild or replace the nation's "severely distressed" public housing. Under the program, Baltimore has been awarded $148 million for the reconstruction or demolition and replacement of six major public-housing complexes.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | May 17, 2008
Samantha Johnson hasn't had an easy time of it. A year ago today, she was hospitalized in a psychiatric ward after attempting suicide, according to court documents, and was later fired from her job at Wal-Mart for missing too much work. One of her two sons, Timothy, 11, has severe asthma. Now Johnson and her boys face eviction from their apartment in a Cherry Hill public housing project because she's behind on the rent. Had it not been for a lawsuit filed Thursday by the Legal Aid Bureau on her behalf and that of three other families, Johnson, 31, might have been on the street as soon as next week.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | June 14, 1997
AS REAL-ESTATE deals go, The Townes at the Terraces is hard to beat: A mere $43,000 buys a brand-new 1,900-square-foot townhouse near the University of Maryland at Baltimore campus, off Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Construction will not start for another few weeks but 45 of the 100 townhouses are spoken for.The Terraces will rise at the site of Lexington Terrace, a complex of five public-housing high-rises that was dynamited 11 months ago. Public-housing tenants will live next to homeowners in 303 townhouses that are indistinguishable from one another.
NEWS
By JOYCE H. KNOX | March 9, 1995
No one can deny that our public housing developments are deeply troubled places. Isolated in the poorest sections of RTC Baltimore with few decent employment opportunities, residents of public housing find it hard to travel up the ladder of success. The provision of services in these communities has taken precedence over providing opportunity. It is a disempowering policy that turns public-housing residents into consumers, not producers.This policy perpetuates dependency and creates the expectation that generation after generation of public-housing residents will live in abject poverty in subsidized housing that has served to contain the poor, particularly the African-American poor.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | May 6, 1991
Chicago -- Should public housing be blown up? Is solution by dynamite, as in the notorious example of Pruitt-Igoe in St. Louis, our best option? Some people believe so -- especially when talking of the destitute and crime-ridden inner-city high-rises, built shoddily and, like Chicago's, deliberately segregated to keep blacks out of white neighborhoods.Vincent Lane, chief of the embattled Chicago Housing Authority, says the detonation alternative makes little sense: ''There are 100,000 people'' in his city's public-housing high-rises.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer Staff Writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | February 1, 1995
Seeking a court-ordered escape for black families from segregated pockets of poverty, six black Baltimore public housing residents filed suit in U.S. District Court yesterday against city and federal officials.The tenants, represented by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, asked the court to remedy what they called a 60-year history of segregation in Baltimore public housing by ordering that they -- and 12,500 other black families in public housing -- be given the chance to live outside highly segregated areas.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
City officials aren't quite sure what to call the new development in Southeast Baltimore, but they turned out in force Tuesday to celebrate the first apartments completed on land that once held the sprawling O'Donnell Heights public housing complex. Eventually, the 62-acre parcel is supposed to contain 925 homes - a mix of subsidized housing, market-rate apartments and owner-occupied units. The 76 "Key's Pointe" homes that officials celebrated Tuesday, half of which are to be rented at market rates, are to be followed by another 75, on which construction could begin as early as next year.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
In the recent commentary, "HABC: Selling off and selling out" (May 1), a great deal of speculation was offered regarding the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's (HABC) participation in the new federal Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program. RAD is the federal government's program to preserve otherwise at-risk public housing for very low-income residents. The federal government has under-funded the public housing program for years, which has resulted in the need for $800 million (in Baltimore alone)
NEWS
By Gary Stroud and Anthony Coates | April 30, 2014
Earlier this year, the Baltimore Brew broke a story of a pilot program through HUD that would allow the Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) to transition 22 public housing high-rises to private ownership over the next two years. Citing a lack of funding to make repairs to the buildings, HABC claims that the only way they can make capital improvements that the buildings require is to put them in the hands of private companies lured by lucrative tax incentive packages. Though the wheels have been in motion to implement this so-called "Rental Assistance Demonstration" (RAD)
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
City officials took the head of the nation's Department of Housing and Urban Development on a tour Wednesday of Barclay to show him work by a private developer they say is starting to turn around the small, impoverished neighborhood in the middle of the city. It's a story of a public-private partnership about to start a new chapter, now that the company is one of 11 developers slated to take over some of the city's public housing units. HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, in town to announce the award of $1.8 billion in capital funds for the nation's public housing, said he expects Baltimore to be a model for the new program, which is designed to allow deteriorating public units to access previously off-limits sources of money for repair.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The Baltimore Housing Authority's plan to sell 22 of its 28 apartment and townhouse complexes drew dozens of concerned tenants and workers Wednesday to a City Council committee hearing. Floyd Vines, a resident at J. Van Story Branch high-rise, one of the properties to be sold, said Maryland leaders should petition Congress to restore its investment in the public housing, rather than turn to private developers to provide a cash infusion. Under the plan announced last week, the Housing Authority will sell nearly 40 percent of its properties to private developers as a way to raise more than $300 million in renovations and upgrades to the aging complexes that need new elevators, heating and cooling systems and modern kitchens and bathrooms.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
A Baltimore Housing Authority proposal to sell more than a third of its 11,000 public housing units to private developers in order to finance $300 million in capital improvements to the properties has got some advocates and tenants worried. Some are calling the plan a "giveaway" to developers eager to convert the units into market-rate rentals, and maintenance workers at the agency have expressed fear for their jobs if the buildings are sold to private owners. But what all those involved in the debate need to recognize is that unless the city tries a new approach, Baltimore's stock of public housing is going to drop anyway because of a lack of money to perform even basic maintenance.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | November 11, 1995
WHEN DANIEL Henson, Baltimore's public-housing chief, visited The Sun's editorial board last month, he remarked that he hoped Baltimore could look to other cities that had dealt positively with the relocation of public-housing tenants. He mentioned, among other places, Yonkers, New York.Having grown up there, I know that Baltimore, now grappling with a housing controversy of its own, would not want to follow in Yonkers' footsteps.Like Baltimore, Yonkers prides itself on a blue-collar, ethnic quirkiness.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | September 25, 2005
Eric C. Brown Occupation Executive director, Annapolis housing authority. In the news Brown was named executive director of the Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis last week. When he starts his new job Oct. 10, he will manage the city's 10 public-housing projects. Brown signed a three-year contract that will pay him $100,000 a year. He takes over after a surge of violence in the city's public-housing neighborhoods -- particularly in Robinwood, where there was a homicide and several shootings this summer.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
It's growing increasingly difficult for the poorest families in Baltimore to find affordable rental housing, and some housing advocates worry new housing policies such as privatization could make the problem worse. An analysis by the Urban Institute found a yawning gap between the number of low-income renter households and affordable units available in every jurisdiction in the country. In Baltimore City in 2012, there were 43 affordable units available per 100 extremely low-income households, down from 58 in 2000, according to the study published last week.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Baltimore's Housing Authority is selling 40 percent of its public housing to private developers. Here are the complexes scheduled to be sold. Officials said changes are possible in the second-year list. First year: McCulloh Homes Extension Lakeview Tower Somerset Court Extension Wyman House Bernard E. Mason Bel Park Tower Brentwood Primrose Place Hollins House Allendale Pleasant View Gardens   Second year: Chase House Ellerslie Govans Manor Monument East Rosemont Tower J. Van Story Branch Heritage Crossing The Townes at the Terraces The Terrace Arbor Oaks Scattered units
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