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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
The County Council is offering a second chance to those whose attempts to testify on County Executive Robert R. Neall's plan to reorganize county government were cut short last week.The council has scheduled a second hearing on the proposed bill at 7:30 p.m. today in the Council Chambers in Annapolis. Council members halted a public hearing last Wednesday after they realized they were running out of time and many of the speakers who signed up to testify would get short shrift.About 17 people signed up to testify last week, but only five spoke before council members cut off the hearing.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Carol L. Bowers and Andrea F. Siegel and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writers | December 11, 1994
At times, Laurie Cook's dismissal hearing last week sounded more like a television tabloid talk show than a personnel hearing, with people being asked to tell all about the relationship between the high school science teacher and the strapping young football player.It could have been carried out behind closed doors; state law allows school personnel hearings to be private.But the Northeast High School teacher exercised her right under the same law to have a public hearing on four charges of misconduct.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1995
The city's zoning board overruled Baltimore's housing commissioner yesterday for ordering a permit without a public hearing for an automobile shredding system at a controversial Southwest Baltimore metal scrap yard.The board then turned around -- after holding the public hearing -- and approved the new shredding system with more than a dozen new restrictions aimed at protecting nearby residents from air and noise pollution.The United Iron and Metal scrap yard, owned by the David Joseph Co., is behind the 2600 block of Wilkens Ave. in the community of Mill Hill.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Howard County school board members have agreed that they need to voice stronger opposition to a bill that would retool the seven-member, at-large, elected body to one with five members elected by district and two appointees. The bill, which requires legislative approval, will be discussed Tuesday at a public hearing. If passed during a special session this month, the legislation would take effect before the Jan. 11 school board primary filing deadline. Board Chairman Janet Siddiqui plans to testify at the hearing, and she asked board members this week for suggestions on rewording her previous testimony.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
The county commissioners will discuss possible changes to several Carroll laws, including the forest conservation ordinance, which requires developers to save trees.Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Robin Bartlett Frazier voted yesterday to hold a public hearing on the laws that govern forest conservation, private streets, parking and mobile home parks. Board President Julia Walsh Gouge was not present during the vote.The public hearing is expected to be held this winter. The commissioners will have the final say on what changes, if any, are made.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2002
The Baltimore County Council's commission on redistricting has announced its plan for getting what critics said was lacking the last time lines were redrawn: public input. The six members, meeting for the first time Friday, said they are reluctant to schedule meetings with other groups that have drafted reform proposals or with people who complained that the council acted in secret when it drew new lines last summer. Such meetings, they said, could keep the commission from meeting its May 1 deadline.
EXPLORE
January 5, 2012
Editor: Next Tuesday, Jan. 10, at 7 p.m. at the Harford County Board of Education building at 102 S. Hickory Ave. in Bel Air, the public hearing for the Solid Waste Transfer Station Bill 11-62 will be held by the County Council. This is a bill to make the County government inform the people that a solid waste transfer station is coming to their neighborhood. It details what sort of trash it will take, where the trash will be taken, how large a facility it will be, and how many trucks will be cruising your neighborhood.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1996
A Glen Burnie partnership can build a 98-bed assisted living facility and office park in Pasadena without a public hearing, despite legislation passed last month requiring such hearings.Mountain View Limited Partnership is planning the facility on 7.4 acres at Mountain Road and Route 100 that is zoned for commercial development. The legislation, sponsored by Councilman William C. Mulford II, applies only to assisted living facilities and nursing homes of 16 beds or more on residential property.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
Swim club property taxes and rural zoning matters are among the pieces of legislation being discussed by the Howard County Council this month. County Councilwoman Courtney Watson is again pursuing a measure to aid six county nonprofit swim clubs whose operators say they are faced with high property taxes compared to pools operated by homeowners associations and the Columbia Association. Community swim club owners have argued that most of their pools face mounting debt because of high property taxes, as well as increased expenses to make much-needed improvements.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Staff | December 22, 1998
Three members of Anne Arundel County Council introduced legislation last night that would throw a speed bump in the path of developers proposing a 61,600-seat auto racetrack in Pasadena.The bill proposed by 3rd District Councilwoman A. Shirley Murphy and two other Democrats would require Chesapeake Motorsports Development Corp. to appear before a public hearing before building on bay front land south of Key Bridge.Murphy's bill would reverse a much-criticized zoning law that the council rushed through in April to allow motor racing complexes as a "conditional use" on land zoned heavy industrial.
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