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By RONALD DWORKIN | January 23, 1991
Public policy views the health-care crisis as basically acute and transitory. Like other contemporary problems, such as pollution and global warming, the crisis in health care is believed to be a technical problem confined to the last decades of the 20th century. For this reason, the health-care debate is rarely intellectualized. Economics, not philosophy, is expected to provide the relevant and practical solutions.I believe, however, that the crisis in health care is in part a product of longstanding intellectual assumptions about health care.
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By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
Sydney Miller, a 15-year-old sophomore at Broadneck High School in Annapolis, lost more than 30 pounds after switching to a vegan diet and giving up all processed foods last year. She also helped her dad, Todd Miller, lose weight. "I eat completely clean," she says. "Adults come up to me and ask me how I do it. " Sydney, who is hoping to be a nutritionist, is sharing her interest in eating well through a multimedia project she created for BeeQuest, a national competition that asks high school students the question: "What's Nutrition Mean to You?"
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NEWS
August 2, 2014
Michelle Minton's attack on my alcohol policy research ( "Are tax dollars paying for anti-alcohol advocacy?" July 30) exhibits a fundamental disagreement with public health research and practice. From immunizations to smoke-free workplaces to motor vehicle safety, public health aims at population-based changes to increase health and well-being. Over the last century, life expectancy in the United States has increased 30 years. No fewer than 25 of these years are credited to public health measures.
NEWS
October 11, 2014
Howard County's public schools are among the top in the nation. We cultivate a vibrant learning community that prepares students to thrive in a dynamic world. We also talk with kids about sex and relationships: "You can get pregnant any time you have sexual intercourse;" the site says. "Wearing a latex condom, taking birth control pills or using other contraceptives are very effective at preventing pregnancy. However the absolute way to not get pregnant is to not have sex at all. " So what was wrong with one of our elected county school board members alerting the board and its student members that a local Giant supermarket is asking the age of those who purchase condoms?
NEWS
March 4, 2013
The Maryland Stadium Authority's decision to prohibit smoking at both Camden Yards and at M&T Bank Stadium is great news for sports fans ("State Authority bans smoking at M&T Stadium, Oriole Park," Feb. 26). Secondhand smoke causes serious disease and premature death among nonsmokers, and there is no safe level of exposure. A study conducted at the University of Maryland Baltimore County found that even outdoors, nonsmokers up to a distance of 23 feet away or more are still exposed to carcinogens.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
Regarding your article about the city's plan to strip some liquor stores of their licenses, many studies have shown that communities with greater densities of alcohol outlets have higher levels of drinking, unintentional injuries and violence ("Baltimore to strip some liquor stores of licenses in rezoning effort," June 18). Specifically, published data about Baltimore show not only an inequitable distribution of liquor stores in predominantly African-American and low-income communities but also significant associations between the presence of liquor stores and the risk of health-related problems.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 15, 2010
Even as aid trickled in Thursday to earthquake-ravaged Haiti - and estimates emerged of as many as 50,000 dead and countless more gravely injured - experts feared the country was on the brink of a public health disaster that could persist for months. While relief workers hoped to provide food and water and to confront the most pressing of immediate medical needs, from antibiotics to bandages, disaster response experts say what remains ahead could be equally daunting: rebuilding from scratch a public health system that was fragile at best before disaster struck.
NEWS
By Georges Benjamin | April 10, 2013
On Thursday, the U.S. Senate will hold a confirmation hearing on Gina McCarthy, President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Over her decades of public service, Ms. McCarthy has demonstrated a strong commitment to protecting public health with pragmatic solutions to our pollution challenges. In short, she has proved that she is a true public health champion. While Ms. McCarthy's most high-profile accomplishments came from her work strengthening and modernizing historic clean air standards to ensure that Americans will be able to breathe easier over the long term, she has dedicated her entire career to keeping kids safe from chemicals, ensuring we have clean and safe drinking water, and tackling the environmental health issues that really matter.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 28, 2011
Alison Geyh, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health who studied air pollution in Lower Manhattan in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, died of cancer Feb. 20 at her Ruxton home. She was 52. Born Alison Daniel in Bad Kreuznach, Germany, where her father was on assignment in the military, she was raised in Anaheim, Calif. As a teenager she was a Cinderella Dancer in the Disneyland Electric Light parade. She remained active in dancing and was also a bicyclist.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Melissa Healey's article, "NYC's failed cap on sugary drinks prompts soul searching" on April 4 draws an interesting parallel between New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's improbable public health battle against obesity and our nation's long history of public health activism and success stories. Taking on the "larger forces" through policy - whether the tobacco and alcohol industries or "Big Food" - is a winning model in public health. The impact of taking on corporate interests is best appreciated in individual behavioral change.
NEWS
October 9, 2014
While much of the response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is contingent on the United States government's public health and military actions ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2), health professionals and government officials have been quite reluctant to come to terms with how America's history of public health espionage and medical mistreatment complicate the battle against Ebola. America has a long history of medical mistreatment and imperialism which are now providing the fuel for Ebola conspiracy beliefs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Joel G. Hill, who had taught at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and was active in Episcopal affairs, died Sept. 18 at her Westminster, Vt., home of cancer. The former Hagerstown resident was 78. The daughter of Van Amburgh Goodrich and Francis Arnold Goodrich, the former Joel Ann Goodrich was born in Kansas City, Mo., and was raised in Del Mar, Calif. She was a graduate of the Bishop's School in La Jolla, Calif., and earned a bachelor's degree in literature in 1974 from the University of Michigan.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While Maryland health officials urged caregivers this week to be alert for possible Ebola virus cases, they were also quick to emphasize there are other — perhaps more contagious — pathogens that they are also monitoring. Public health officials around the world remain on watch for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, while the United States is on guard for enterovirus D68 cases among children. As flu season begins, surveillance for that illness is resuming, and other potentially deadly threats such as avian flu lurk, as well.
HEALTH
Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
As health officials fail to contain West Africa's Ebola outbreak, recent scares at two Baltimore-area hospitals highlight the need for hospitals here and across the United States to prepare space and equipment for what some consider inevitable - the arrival of the deadly virus here. While experts say the chances of an epidemic spreading in the U.S. are low, there is a real possibility that someone could come down with Ebola after returning from a trip to Africa, they said. Hospitals routinely ask patients with flu-like symptoms whether they have visited that continent recently.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Michelle Minton's attack on my alcohol policy research ( "Are tax dollars paying for anti-alcohol advocacy?" July 30) exhibits a fundamental disagreement with public health research and practice. From immunizations to smoke-free workplaces to motor vehicle safety, public health aims at population-based changes to increase health and well-being. Over the last century, life expectancy in the United States has increased 30 years. No fewer than 25 of these years are credited to public health measures.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, Andrea K. Walker and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein said Wednesday he plans to leave his post as secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he drew criticism for the botched rollout of the state's health insurance exchange website. Sharfstein, a trained pediatrician who has spent his career in public service, will join the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health as an associate dean in January as the O'Malley administration ends. He took the state post three years ago after developing a national profile for his aggressive pursuit of public health initiatives in children's health, HIV and other areas.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
How do public health experts handle research when they know they cannot offer subjects the best medical treatment possible - only "less than the best" solutions? It poses serious ethical issues, especially when children are involved in the research, as a controversial Kennedy Krieger Institute study shows. Just 20 years ago, most houses in East Baltimore contained lead paint that was known to be poisoning children at epidemic levels. Amid the crisis, researchers at the pediatric hospital sought cheap, effective abatement techniques because full-scale cleanup could cost $20,000 or more per house - more than many of the properties were worth.
NEWS
Christian John Lillis | June 2, 2014
Anyone who has lost a loved one has experienced the five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Following my mother's death from one such infection, Clostridium difficile, or C. diff., in April 2010, I went through the stages also. In making the shift from depression to acceptance, my brother and I founded the Peggy Lillis Memorial Foundation to raise awareness of C. diff. In our anger at learning that a disease we'd never heard of, not only claimed our mother, but also kills more than 28,000 Americans every year, we committed to ensuring that her death would not be in vain.
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