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By Laura Smitherman and Don Markus and Baltimore Sun reporters | November 25, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley waded into a brewing controversy over football coach Ralph Friedgen's contract at the University of Maryland, saying that public money shouldn't be used to buy out his contract if that's what officials in College Park decide to do. "Were they to decide that there needed to be a change, I would hope that they not use public funds to buy out that contract," O'Malley said Tuesday in a response to questions from reporters....
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NEWS
August 5, 2014
Last week, the Maryland Democratic Party took a swipe at Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan for his decision to use public campaign financing during the primary and general elections, noting in a news release that Mr. Hogan, "who often claims to be the only candidate who will protect tax dollars, received over $320,000 in taxpayer funds for the Republican primary and nearly $2.6 million for the general election. " But a story today in the Washington Post about the free flow of campaign contributions from the owner of one of Maryland's casino licenses to the coffers of the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, and his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, offers a reminder of just how wise an investment public campaign financing is. The Democratic party is trying to make hay out of the idea that some of those taxpayer funds (donated willingly, incidentally, through a check-off box on state income tax returns)
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
Candidates for governor in 1998 and thereafter would have the option of running their campaigns with money contributed by taxpayers under legislation unanimously approved by the General Assembly yesterday.Last year, Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey came within fewer than 6,000 votes of victory in a heavily Democratic state thanks to a campaign supported by more than $1 million in public funds. It was Maryland's first experience with public financing.The state Senate and House of Delegates both voted unanimously yesterday to continue and expand that system.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
When Baltimore restaurateur Casey Jenkins opens the Birdland Sports Bar & Grill on Belair Road this month, it will be one of a few sit-down restaurants along the commercial strip. But he, and many others, hope it won't be the last. City, county and neighborhood groups are coalescing around efforts to revitalize the U.S. 1 drag, a corridor once known for its car dealerships and now a hodgepodge of rim shops, takeout joints and convenience stores. Some $5 million in city, state and federal money is being directed to street improvements, a first step to drawing new business to the area.
SPORTS
By Laura Smitherman and Don Markus and Laura Smitherman and Don Markus,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com and don.markus@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley waded into a brewing controversy over football coach Ralph Friedgen's contract at the University of Maryland, saying that public funds shouldn't be used to buy out his contract if that's what officials in College Park decide to do. "Were they to decide that there needed to be a change, I would hope that they not use public funds to buy out that contract," O'Malley said Tuesday in a response to questions from reporters....
NEWS
February 15, 2006
THE ISSUE: State and county officials are working to find ways to preserve 892 acres of Doughoregan Manor, the three-century-old estate and mansion of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Solutions could involve millions in public funds to acquire development rights and allow the Carroll family to renovate and repair the buildings while guarding their privacy. Or the family could develop the land. Do you think the public should have any access to this historic farm and manor house if public funds are used to help preserve the family's estate?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
The chairman of the City Council's taxation committee says he'll hold a hearing on $107 million in infrastructure financing for the Harbor Point development now that he's received documents outlining the case for the funding. Last week, Councilman Carl Stokes said he wanted more detailed information from the Baltimore Development Corp. before holding a hearing on tax increment financing for infrastructure at Harbor Point, which would house a regional headquarters for the energy giant Exelon Corp.
NEWS
January 18, 1995
Of all the ways to get off to a bad start, the city's new empowerment zone czar has picked a dandy. The board that will dispense $100 million in public funds and dole out $225 million in tax breaks to business threatens to do much of its business behind closed doors. With public confidence in government at a low point these days, that is putting one of the best things that has happened to Baltimore in a long time under a cloud.The decision by Claude Edward Hitchcock, who will be chief executive of the empowerment project, initially to close all meetings and subsequently to open them partially, is an act of bad faith.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 28, 1995
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- Former Orange County Treasurer-Tax Collector Robert L. Citron pleaded guilty yesterday to six felony counts of misappropriating public funds, falsifying documents and misleading both investors in county bonds and the government agencies that put their money in his ill-fated investment fund.Citron, 70, faces a maximum of 14 years in prison.The plea followed weeks of negotiations between Citron's attorney and the county district attorney's office. It completes a dizzying fall for the reclusive money manager, who had been re-elected handily just 11 months ago to the job he had held since 1970.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1994
U.S. Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, the front-runner for the Republican gubernatorial nomination, is among five candidates who have told the state they may seek public funds to help finance their campaigns.Mrs. Bentley's preliminary filing with the state election board was surprising because her campaign was believed to be well financed with private contributions -- and if she accepts state money, she could have to agree to spending limits well below the amount the leading Democrats are expected to spend.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
The article "When science is for hire" (Aug 23) raises important issues about consumer protections from hazardous chemicals and the need for better controls on industry-sponsored research. Consumers are the losers when researchers, industry, scientific journals, and in the Eastman Chemical case even the courts, cannot agree on standards of objectivity in assessing public health risks. The story illustrates why government funding of research is still needed and should be increased.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
The chairman of the City Council's taxation committee says he'll hold a hearing on $107 million in infrastructure financing for the Harbor Point development now that he's received documents outlining the case for the funding. Last week, Councilman Carl Stokes said he wanted more detailed information from the Baltimore Development Corp. before holding a hearing on tax increment financing for infrastructure at Harbor Point, which would house a regional headquarters for the energy giant Exelon Corp.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 2, 2013
The ACLU of Maryland is calling for legislators to halt funding to religious and private schools, saying that taxpayer money should be put toward the state's funding obligation to public schools. In a release, the advocacy organization called a taxpayer subsidy of $500,000 slated to go to private schools next year "unfair. " The funding, included in the state's supplementary budget, was scheduled to be reviewed in the House Appropriations Committee on Tuesday.  “Taxpayer funding should not be used for textbooks and technology at private and religious schools, especially when the state's fiscal climate that is just beginning to recover,” Sara Love, public policy director for the ACLU of Maryland, said in a statement.  The organization went on to say: "Our public funds should be dedicated to public schools.
NEWS
By Brendan J. Doherty | November 4, 2012
As President Barack Obama recently headlined the last of a record-breaking number of fundraisers for his reelection bid, it is important to understand that the extraordinary rise in presidential fundraising efforts in recent decades is an unintended consequence of our campaign finance system and that these dynamics are changing the ways that presidents allocate their most precious resource for both campaigning and governing: their time. President Obama's 220 fundraisers for the Obama Victory Fund, a joint committee benefiting both the Obama-Biden reelection campaign and the Democratic National Committee, exceed the combined total of 208 fundraisers headlined by his five immediate predecessors for their reelection campaigns and national committees in their third and fourth years in office: 86 by George W. Bush; 70 by Bill Clinton; 24 by George H.W. Bush; three by Ronald Reagan; and 25 by Jimmy Carter.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
A Prince George's County lawmaker used public dollars to pay an employee of her law office after the bank closed her law firm's depleted account, the state prosecutor told a jury Tuesday in opening remarks in the criminal trial of Del. Tiffany Alston. But Alston's attorney countered that the employee did work as a legislative clerk last January for the freshman delegate and that politics are driving the charges. State prosecutors allege that Alston, a Bowie Democrat, paid the employee $800 in state money, and the worker didn't set foot in Alston's office after filling out state employment paperwork.
NEWS
June 28, 2011
The Supreme Court's assault on efforts to limit the toxic effect of money on elections in this country continued this week with the decision to strike down an important provision of Arizona's public financing of elections. Under the Arizona law, candidates who elected to have their campaigns publicly financed were eligible for additional so-called "trigger" funds if their privately financed opponents' fundraising exceeded a certain amount. The effort was to keep the playing field somewhat level.
NEWS
May 29, 1992
With the conviction of John M. Staubitz Jr., an important chapter of the Maryland State Games swindle is closed. The former deputy health secretary helped bilk taxpayers of $1.2 million, much of which should have gone to drug abuse prevention. Instead, it went into his pocket and some others where it didn't belong. Now he and a former aide, James E. Narron, face prison sentences. But that's not the end of the story.The State Games were not just a facade for theft of public money. They were also a boondoggle that went on for years undetected.
NEWS
July 21, 1994
In politics, a little hyperbole is part of electioneering. Puff your credentials as much as you can. Make modest proposals sound like major-league changes. Be sure to sound like you're out to help Joan and John Taxpayer.We've seen all this in the summer's gubernatorial campaign. Some of it is the expected puffery that goes with running for office. But a few candidates have stretched the truth beyond legitimacy.The most recent example was Rep. Helen D. Bentley's claim that accepting money from the state's public campaign finance fund would be "nothing more than political welfare" in which a candidate would "ride on the backs of taxpayers."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
Maryland Public Television officials are troubled by Gov. Martin O'Malley's use of station footage in a campaign advertisement critical of Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s record on taxes, and have requested that the commercial stop running. O'Malley campaign aides insist they did nothing wrong in creating a spot that uses a public television interview in which Ehrlich explains the property tax increase and auto registration and "flush tax" fees imposed during his term by saying "there's a big difference between fees and taxes.
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